Organic Gardening: How to Choose the Most Suitable Worm Bin for Your Composting Worms

There are four basic types of worm composters: the bins, flow throughs, stackables, and beds. Each of these worm bin types can be the best one for your vermicomposting project. To know which of these composters will suit your preferences will, read furthermore of this article. Bins for worm use A bin can be in the form of any container that is most often than not, box-like in shape (can be used as indoor or outdoor worm bins). Mostly these are also shaped using materials that are in the form of plastic and wood (can be of lumber or plywood material). Old items in the house such as a recycled trash bin, a busted refrigerator, a broken  toilet, or an old wooden drawer can be turned into a make-shift worm composter. A Flow through for worm use A flow through is much like a bin (a box-type bin that can either be used as outdoor or indoor worm bins), as the food scraps flow-through the bin downwards. But in this set-up, the worm castings are harvested from the bottom of the container (unlike bin’s where castings are typically harvested on top of the bedding). It works by feeding the worm from the topmost part of the composter. And as the worms progress to producing these organic scraps into rich compost, their castings also gradually fall down to the base of the composter (there is a hole and a grid attached on the bottom part of the bin that helps separate …

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Eisenia Foetida: Red worms composting guide for organic gardening

Red worms composting has been one of several composting methods that are being widely used by earth enthusiasts today. Other than the profit ventures that one can also tap into when vermicomposting, this natural process can certainly help recycle daily household waste on a continual level. It can also be utilized by people who have space restrictions (can be favorable for people who own houses with a yard space and for those who have none like apartment dwellers), so it’s that flexible to maintain and have around. Setting-up a Red Worms Farm Before you can provide additional supplement to your organic garden (in this manner with the cultivation and use of worm castings fertilizer), you must first set-up a home for your red worms (make sure to place their bin where they’re away from direct sunlight – room temperature is ideal). You’ll need a worm bin (a container that can either be made out of wood or plastic), your supply of worms (you can start with about 2,000 red wigglers), some organic bedding materials (you can go with some presoaked newspaper strips with some dead leaves), and of course some worm food (cut pieces of kitchen and yard scraps). Drilled holes on the worm bin A conducive environment for your red worms would be a place where there’s enough moisture to go around and where oxygen is abundant. You can provide both for your red composting worms by drilling holes around the compost bin. You’ll need to drill evenly spaced …

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Composting and Yard care Alternatives that can be Practiced at Home

There are plenty of ways to make the world a better place to live in. And becoming more aware of the environments needs by doing your simple composting and recycling acts at home can go along way. So instead of using chemicals to supplement your garden or to spend money on unnecessary materials, here are a few composting and yard care alternatives that can be done at home to save you on costs, energy, time, and other resources. Alternatives for composting There are different ways to turn your organic scraps into nutrient-rich compost. You can always opt to choose the aerobic method (uses oxygen to breakdown organic wastes) or the anaerobic method (does not require oxygen to be able to start producing finished compost). But aside from that, worm composting using Red wigglers or European Nightcrawlers can also be used to help generate this natural product for your lawn. You can opt to use the latter option since vermicomposting has been recognized to be the fastest way to produce organic fertilizer and natural pest product (there’s a big difference to using chemical fertilizer vs organic fertilizer). Not only are these worms able to breakdown the food and garden scraps more finely, they’re also able to produce these faster than any other composting method (you can harvest worm castings in just a few months). And since the scraps that are being turned into a valuable resource are free, you will also get the chance to recycle these without having to spend …

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The Best Worm Species for Vermicomposting

The best worm species when it comes to worm composting would be your typical nightcrawlers and red wiggler worms. But if you’re looking for the best worm type to help you well with the decomposition of your organic debris, then turn to the king of all wormery worms – the Red Wigglers. But other than these earth miracle workers, there are other compost worms that work well in the composting scenario. Epigeic Worms Epigeic worms are typically used for vermicomposting (such as the Eisenia Fetida for example). They’re the type that likes to settle on top soil (does less burrowing), and likes to eat and live off of organic scraps.  They also adapt well when placed inside a worm composting bin or worm bed. The Blue Worm Blue worms can also be distinguished as the traveling worm or the the India blue worm. This worm specie is also native to the tropical parts of Asia. Also known as the Perionyx Excavatus, the blue worm can also grow for as long as 1 ¼ to 2 ¾ inches in length. These crawlers also prefer to be in warmer temperatures that range from 70 to 80 degrees Fahrenheit. You can expect for these worms to also reach the adult stage between a 3 to 5 week timeframe. The African Nightcrawler Also known as Eudrilus Eugeniae, the African Nightcrawler is a tropical worm. It can stand higher temperatures provided that they are given with enough moisture (this only means that African Nightcrawlers will …

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How to manage indoor and outdoor worm bins

There are several efficient ways when it comes to managing both indoor and outdoor worm bins. There’s providing compost worms with a home that they can comfortably stay in; as well as providing them with a fresh stock of moist organic bedding materials regularly. Other than that, you’ll also know that harvesting worm castings, worm eggs, and composting worms also play big roles when keeping the bin well-maintained. Providing a suitable environment for the worms Worms will continue to thrive, multiply in number, and produce rich castings if they were to be kept in an environment where they’ll feel most at home. So it would be best to place them inside a bin that closely resembles their original habitat (whether these will be used as outdoor or indoor worm bins). That’s why organic bedding materials are essential when creating a worm farm. Fill your worm bin with bedding stuff (presoaked newspaper shreds, cardboard, dead leaves, soil), and have these piled up to not more than 3 to 5 inches high (ideal for composters that are 12-18 inches deep). Also spray some water into these so that you may be able to create a moist worm bed. It’s also crucial that you keep the bedding moist, as worms always rely on this kind of consistency (worms only breathe through their damp skin as they’re born without lungs). Keeping your worms where the bin contents are too dry (may cause skin irritation) or too wet (may cause the worms to drown) can …

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Growing Potted Plants with Red Wigglers

Growing potted plants using healthy soil will create nothing but good garden produce. Whether you’ll be growing fruits, vegetables, herbs, or even flowers, planting these in soil that is well-nourished, will develop well through time; more so when you pot them using red wigglers castings. Compost from worms are food waste that are broken down during a quick timeframe. These organic scraps, in their finer and richer form, will also return back to the earth with more nutrients in tow. Apart from its other beneficial uses, it also helps support all the other microbes that also depend on the soil for their survival. Red worms castings The physical look of worm castings actually resemble that of the soil from the ground. It’s crumbly to the touch, and is also dark-brown in shade (although it’s also been referred to as black topsoil). The benefits to using red wiggler worms castings Red wiggler worms are certainly important organisms that can truly help build beneficial soil. Besides turning organic wastes into rich soil, red worms also have the ability to aerate the soil that they’re in, (helps introduce oxygen into the soil), and also enhances the soil conditions for all the other beneficial organisms present in the soil (such as good bacteria, fungus, etc.). The Eisenia foetida (the scientific name for red wiggler worms) worm is actually a vegetarian. It only means that this earthworm only eats off of natural materials (except for a few wastes such as meat or poultry, as these …

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How to Choose an Indoor or Outdoor Worm Bin

The best kind of compost bin can still differ from one person’s individual feedback to another. Other than the variation in prices, shapes, sizes, and even styles, composters for garden use can be simply determined through several things. To know which composting bin will best suit you and your organic garden, you may read furthermore of this article. Narrowing down your options There are compost bins that are homemade, as there are also garden composters that are already being sold commercially. You can also be assured that all of these will work into helping create some nutrient-rich organic compost for you. But note that composter selections can also be quite endless for anyone’s picking (there’s wood, plastic, wire-made, open, tumbling, etc.). However, you can still choose by going through a few buying considerations: (1) the allotted budget for your composter bin choice, (2) the size, capacity, and quantity of the bin, (3) the speed of the bin, (4) and the exterior look of the bin. Budget allotment for a prospective garden composter It’s important that you only purchase a composter that will fit your budget rather than splurge your money on something that won’t actually work well in your garden. You’re going to have to set a price range so that you’ll know where to start from. Also look for something that’s long-lasting and of high-quality. You’ll be surprised that even the most basic models last longer than the other preferences. Compost bin size, capacity and quantity Determining the size …

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Things to know before buying red wigglers online

It will be advantageous for any composter newbie to be informed of the know-how’s of buying red wigglers online. Red wiggler worms aren’t usually seen crawling from underneath the garden, as these are reared in specialized areas such as farms (thus the terms worm farm or worm ranch). And now that many people are already into vermicomposting, it’s also expected that many people will also be into selling worms for a profit. Now most reliable merchants will be found selling on actual sites (local worm farms), as some prefer to sell their goods on the web. So to avoid being swindled with the wrong kind of worms, it’ll be best to practice with caution as well. You can get more valuable tips on buying red wiggler worms online by reading further of this article. Tip 1: It pays to read up on the online stores testimonials There will be countless of stores catering to the sale of compost worms; and you will be free to choose which of these to buy from. But before you go right ahead into purchasing your supply of red wiggler worms, start by reading up on the company’s testimonials. Feedbacks from previous customers can come in handy. So check whether there are more positive responses from the negative reactions (if there are any). The reliability of a company can also be seen in this point of view (it’s important to know how the company works with its customers). You can also get referrals from trusted …

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Raising worms to use as live fishing bait

Going on fishing trips can be quite exciting, especially if you’re very passionate about it. Take for example the people who make a living out of fishing, like Fishermen. These fishermen will always have their need for the right tools to get their daily catch. They will need their line, their hook, and of course, their fish bait. Now when it comes to any live fishing bait, the number one product that is used for this kind of activity are typically red wigglers or nightcrawlers. You won’t be surprised that many people are already raising worms so that they may be able to offer avid fishermen with their daily needs, for very affordable prices. A Fisherman and a Worm Composter Any one can actually go into nightcrawler or red worms composting, so why not fishermen too? You just have to imagine yourself as a fisherman, and picture how things should run for you. Since buying worms to use as bait can also be costly on your end (especially when the need to fish is done on a regular basis), it would also be a great idea to raise and breed your very own supply. In this way, not only will you be using your own produce, you can also be assured that the live bait worms that you’ll be using have also been raised well. So if you think both types of work are not in line, just remember that a fisherman can also be a worm composter. Being both …

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Production of Worm Castings: How valuable is it?

Did you know that worms are capable of creating an organic fertilizer product? Yes, you’ve ready it right! Worms are not only good when it comes to breaking down decomposing organic scraps (scraps that are regularly accumulated from your yard or kitchen). They’re also great when it comes to turning these raw materials into a valuable source of compost. Application of worm castings on your garden or farm can offer your plants and soil with nutrients and more. Read more from this article to find out why castings from worms are priceless. Castings – Priceless but very inexpensive to obtain Worm castings compost is priceless but not in the monetary sense. So how to go about this? Well these are actually very cheap to obtain since you’ll only need a batch of worms, a composter, bedding materials, and some organic food for your start-up. You’ll just have to give the proper care and maintenance that these worms need, and you’re off to doubling the breed of your worms in no time. In this case, you’ll no longer have to worry about buying your new stock of worms as these soil creatures are also capable of reproducing quickly (you’ll be able to see newborn worms in more or less 6 weeks). Castings – Priceless and Profitable Just imagine a double in numbers. It will only mean more worms and more opportunities for harvesting worm castings. But did you know that you can also sell your worms as fish bait to fishermen, …

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