Red Worms For Composting

Not to be silly, but have you ever thought of poop as priceless? Welcome to the wonderful world of vermicomposting. Meet Mr. Red Wiggler – the best natural composter we know. He works tirelessly scouring for organic matter to eat and digest, which results in nutrient-rich castings that are very beneficial to plants. These castings are referred to as “black gold” by Uncle Jim. It’s the very best form of fertilizer or compost known to plants! Getting Started Uncle Jim’s Worm Farm offers everything you need to start a home vermiculture system, including our famous Red Wigglers who are guaranteed to arrive healthy and ready to gobble up your food waste. Here’s a basic list of what you’ll need to start composting with red worms: Shallow box or container – your box system doesn’t need to be deep because worms like to feed in the uppermost layers of bedding. You can build your own container/box with wood pallets or you can order one specifically designed for red worm composting. Bedding – the material used for bedding is important because it has to be able to retain moisture. Worms require moisture so that they can breathe. Suitable materials include cardboard, shredded newspaper, fallen leaves, manure, or peat moss. Soaking new bedding overnight in water brings good results. Just remember the saying, “if it’s dry, they will die.” Worms also need a little bit of soil in their bedding so that they can use it to break down food in their gizzard. Red …

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10 Economical Garden Vegetables

When it comes to garden growing, there are loads of variables to be considered. One of these variables that growers occasionally stress over is economics. Is all of the hard work and time put into growing a plentiful garden going to pay off when harvest season rolls around? Will the expenditures involved in home gardening exceed the typical prices of fresh produce at the grocery store? These are great questions to ask yourself at the beginning of each year as you make preparations for your new crop. To help you make the most of your gardening experience, Uncle Jim’s Worm Farm would like to recommend some of the most economical vegetables to grow at home. These veggies are especially economical for small gardens. The following results are based on yield/sq. ft., retail value/lb, and growing time. 10 Economical Garden Vegetables Beets Carrots Cucumbers Edible-Pod Peas Green Bunching Onions Leaf Lettuce Onions Peppers Snap Beans Summer Squash Bonus: Swiss Chard Are there any vegetables on that list that you are particularly fond of? Obviously, gardeners should have the produce that they like to eat at the top of their lists, but it’s always good to try new varieties. Growing the same exact variety of vegetable year after year can lead to pest problems and lower yields. Crop rotation is a practice used by farmers all over the world to keep their yields high. The same principle should also be applied to home gardening. Good compost will greatly enhance the abundance, size and …

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“Where in the world can I find some delicious mealworms?!”

“Um, you want delicious mealworms? GROSS!” Not so fast, sonny. By no means am I seeking to eat mealworms for myself (although, many people from around the world do consume mealworms for their protein, and because of how easy they are to raise), but instead, to feed some hungry pets. Mealworms are high in protein, making them beneficial for pet owners of the reptilian and avarian variety. Young animals require a substantial amount of protein in order to grow their full size. But, not all worms will be suitable. A lot of reptile and bird hatchlings can often be finicky with what they are willing to eat. But mealworms are one of nature’s most admirable delicacies, as they are highly sought and eagerly welcomed by chirping chicks or hissing geckos. And after becoming familiar with this information, the next question becomes: “Where in the world can I find some delicious mealworms!”  Mealworms can be discovered in nature, usually fallen trees, decaying logs, leaf piles, and grains. They’re going to be in a warmer climate, so usually spring to summer time. But before you set off hunting mealworms, be forewarned that the mealworms are in a larva stage, meaning that the mealworm is only 1 stage of a metamorphosis. If you are about to launch mealworm manhunt, then consider also searching for the darkling beetle. Darkling beetles are the final phase of the metamorphosis, and can be easier to find, because the life cycle lasts longest in this stage. Darkling beetles …

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Red Wiggler Worms – Nature’s Wonder Workers

Red wiggler worms have been identified as one of nature’s wonder workers. Not only are they the best composters, they also produce the finest organic fertilizer known today. You will be able to experience a lot more great rewards when raising red wiggler worms as they’re also great at aerating the soil and as bait for fish. Red Wiggler Worms as Composters Composting with red wiggler worms can be a rewarding activity. It is through their involvement in the natural process that they are able to produce nutrient-packed castings out of your everyday garbage. Yes, you’ve read it right! Your collection of garbage can be turned into their bedding and can also be fed to these soil creatures; and they will be able to break these down at a much faster rate as opposed to other composting methods. But you’ll also have to note that you can only feed them those that are also organic based (avoid feeding them stuff that includes meat, poultry, seafood, dairy, spicy, oily, salty and citrusy materials as these have bad effects on them). Red Wigglers provide the best material for the soil Red wigglers composting worms produce the most valuable and cheapest resource for conditioning the soil. Their castings are typically composed of nutrients and trace minerals (those that they’ve absorbed from all the organic materials that they feed on). Those of which when used are also very beneficial to plants rooted beneath it. When the soil is healthy, it will be able to …

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How to Order Worms from Uncle Jim’s Worm Farm

James Shaw, founder and owner of Uncle Jims Worm Farm, has been in the industry of worm farming for about four decades now. Uncle Jim’s specializes in breeding and raising Red Wiggler worms (also known as composting worms). But is also in the business of selling other worm species and supplies. A company that is USDA approved (also federally inspected), this reputable vermiculture farm was also featured in the Oprah Winfrey show. Ordering is easy at Uncle Jim’s Worm Farm! Uncle Jim’s worms are guaranteed to be the lowest-priced composting worms being sold on the Internet to date. Other than its affordability, the brand also keeps its old and new customers accustomed to their easy-to-use ordering system. When you order 5000 worms for example, a shopping cart can be accessed below the webpage. From here, you will find a few buttons that will provide you a few more options such as clicking your ‘preferred quantity’. And when you’re done, you can click the Add To Cart button. You will then be redirected to a page that will ask you to choose on ‘Continue Shopping’ or to ‘Proceed to Checkout’. Should you choose the latter, a Checkout form will appear right after. Fill-up the form and then pay your balance. What to expect from Uncle Jim’s packaging When you order from the worm farm, expect your earthworms to get to you in an 8-inch cube corrugated cardboard box. Uncle Jim’s earthworms are always carefully packed inside a breathable cotton bag. Now, …

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Using red wiggler worms for making fertilizer

If you’re looking for a quick return of investment, then you should try getting into vermicomposting. Composting with worms not only is good option for recycling decomposing natural wastes, it can also serve as a great opportunity to put up a business venture. Red wiggler worms can be sold as is, as well as make a profit out of selling their nutrient-rich castings. You can learn more about worm compost production by reading more from this article.   Raising and breeding red wigglers for compost production Before you can even harvest any of these valuable red worms castings, you must first keep them in a comfortable home (one that closely resembles their real habitat). A worm habitat can be in the form of a compost bin. One that’s already been drilled with ventilation and drainage holes around it (ample amounts of oxygen is needed for these worms and other beneficial microbes to survive). Aside from that, providing your compost worms a nice bedding to set themselves in is also an essential. Make sure that the bedding materials are organic and moist as worms also eat off of these. Of course, food is also a necessity for these worms (best if these were served in tiny cut pieces and buried into the bedding), as well as placing them in a good location (the ideal location to place them in would be in an area where there’s room temperature – extreme temperatures can kill them). Worm castings composition Typically, the Eisenia Foetida …

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Lawn Care: How often can you spray your lawn with worm tea?

Worm tea like most fertilizers, is a product that can be directly applied on your lawn without having to worry about burning it (unlike the usage of chemical fertilizers). It’s an organic solution that can instantly be absorbed by the grass, and is something that’s made readily available for the sod’s consumption. Now worm compost tea is actually worm castings that have been previously oxygenated and submerged in chlorine-free water. You can learn more about the right use and application for worm compost tea by reading further of this article. Worm Tea Supplies Vermicomposting tea can be done by gathering the following supplies: your supply of worm castings, an old sock (should be hole-less so that the compost doesn’t seep out), some dechlorinated water (you can also use tap water that’s been left to settle for about 24 hours), some molasses or corn syrup, a 5-gallon bucket, and a bubbler. How to create worm tea The water that you’ll be using for the tea should be chlorine-free. It’s best to keep it that way so that you don’t destroy the live microbes that will be present in the system. Now, have your old sock filled with some castings. Have the sock tied securely before submerging it in the water. As soon as the sock is soaked, add in some molasses or corn syrup (either organic substances will be used as food for the live organisms contained in the tea). The last step is to set-up the bubbler (aerating the tea …

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Uncle Jim’s Worm Farm

Generally, when it comes to vermicomposting, red wigglers have been able to surpass all the other worm species when their ability as composters are put to work. Composting with these worms using organic wastes keeps them alive and thriving. They can live with and eat off of decomposing food wastes for as long as they can. And the best part about them is that they’re also able to produce a valuable source of fertilizer and soil amendment (great for gardens or farms). These fascinating attributes and more will be tackled further in this article. Red wiggler worms and their different yet effective skills Not only are red worms the best composting earthworms, they’re also noted for several other interesting things. Apart from having the ability to eat half of their own weight on a daily basis, they’re also able to produce a rich source of fertilizer (out of their organic meals). It’s also through their constant production of compost (also known as worm poop or castings) that they’re also able to nourish all kinds of plant species (application of worm castings on the soil that has plants rooted in it). Red wiggler worms have also been recognized as the most quickest and most effective when it comes to decomposing and producing compost. Apart from that, they’ve also been identified as the most prolific when it comes to breeding. They can multiply quite fast (worms are able to lay eggs every 10 days), and can populate their bins (or any other …

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Organic Gardening: How to Choose the Most Suitable Worm Bin for Your Composting Worms

There are four basic types of worm composters: the bins, flow throughs, stackables, and beds. Each of these worm bin types can be the best one for your vermicomposting project. To know which of these composters will suit your preferences will, read furthermore of this article. Bins for worm use A bin can be in the form of any container that is most often than not, box-like in shape (can be used as indoor or outdoor worm bins). Mostly these are also shaped using materials that are in the form of plastic and wood (can be of lumber or plywood material). Old items in the house such as a recycled trash bin, a busted refrigerator, a broken  toilet, or an old wooden drawer can be turned into a make-shift worm composter. A Flow through for worm use A flow through is much like a bin (a box-type bin that can either be used as outdoor or indoor worm bins), as the food scraps flow-through the bin downwards. But in this set-up, the worm castings are harvested from the bottom of the container (unlike bin’s where castings are typically harvested on top of the bedding). It works by feeding the worm from the topmost part of the composter. And as the worms progress to producing these organic scraps into rich compost, their castings also gradually fall down to the base of the composter (there is a hole and a grid attached on the bottom part of the bin that helps separate …

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Eisenia Foetida: Red worms composting guide for organic gardening

Red worms composting has been one of several composting methods that are being widely used by earth enthusiasts today. Other than the profit ventures that one can also tap into when vermicomposting, this natural process can certainly help recycle daily household waste on a continual level. It can also be utilized by people who have space restrictions (can be favorable for people who own houses with a yard space and for those who have none like apartment dwellers), so it’s that flexible to maintain and have around. Setting-up a Red Worms Farm Before you can provide additional supplement to your organic garden (in this manner with the cultivation and use of worm castings fertilizer), you must first set-up a home for your red worms (make sure to place their bin where they’re away from direct sunlight – room temperature is ideal). You’ll need a worm bin (a container that can either be made out of wood or plastic), your supply of worms (you can start with about 2,000 red wigglers), some organic bedding materials (you can go with some presoaked newspaper strips with some dead leaves), and of course some worm food (cut pieces of kitchen and yard scraps). Drilled holes on the worm bin A conducive environment for your red worms would be a place where there’s enough moisture to go around and where oxygen is abundant. You can provide both for your red composting worms by drilling holes around the compost bin. You’ll need to drill evenly spaced …

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