The Anatomy of a Red Wiggler Composting Worm – Eisenia fetida

The best type of worms for your composter is the Red Worm (Red Wiggler). Their voracious appetites, medium size, and heartiness make them ideal composting worms. Falling into the genus “anulus,” meaning “ring” in Latin, the Eisenia fetida has up to 120 circular rings. The Red Worm Body On the outside of the red wiggler worm is the cuticle. Below this, the epidermis is skin-like tissue that sends information to the nerve tissue. Sensory information travels from layers of nerve tissue to the nerve cord. Data is processed in the cerebral ganglion, which is the worm equivalent of a brain. Ever notice the rings on a red worm? These rings

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Composting Worm Feeding Guide: Best and Worst Foods

What are the best foods to feed composting worms? What are the worst foods? People who compost with worms face these questions every day. Fortunately, Uncle Jim’s Worm Farm has this Worm Feeding Guide! Vermicomposting is easy if you know the right foods to feed the worms — and the foods to avoid. Qualities of Ideal Foods for Worms Composting worms are hungry for your kitchen left-overs, garden waste, and coffee grounds! The best foods for worms come from plants. This includes grains, fruits, vegetables, and beans. Plant matter is filled with nutrients and vitamins that worms need. Their excrement, called “humus,” contains digested nutrients and earth-friendly bacteria. Humus makes an ideal fertilizer for growing new plants. Worms do not have teeth. Their little mouths take in the

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Make Your Own Seed-Starting Mix with Compost

The anticipation of the spring’s plantings gives hope to gardeners throughout the winter. Get a taste of spring four to 12 weeks before the final frost by starting seeds indoors! Making your own seed-starting mix is economical. And if you compost with worms, your wiggly friends will produce a perfect seed-starting ingredient: organic fertilizer. Certain plants, such as tomatoes and peppers, grow best when cultivated indoors before spring planting. The little plants have time to develop roots and grow strong before being subject to outdoor conditions. Growing starts extends the growing season. In the case of nightshades, most gardens cultivate a relatively small number of them, so each one counts. Garden centers and nurseries cultivate food plants and put them out for sale as the spring approaches. This seems like an easy shortcut. Buyer, beware! Did you know these plants: have a limited selection of variety. If you want heirloom plants or special varieties, you will need to start from seed. have been treated with chemicals, except if they are organic. may be worse for wear after transportation and handling. How far did they travel? are more expensive than DIY Choose Your Seeds Look at your gardening plan. Choose which types of plants you would like to start in advance. If you are unfamiliar with this, do some research. When you purchase seeds, read the seed packet for more information. You can find seeds at grocery stores, gardening centers, hardware stores, natural food stores, and online. Uncle Jim’s Worm Farm …

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How to Get Free Worm Food

Composting with worms is a great way to make free fertilizer. Diverting unwanted food scraps from the landfill helps save the environment. And vermicomposting is a fun hobby for all ages. But where can you get enough free worm food for volume composting? For many households, the scraps generated in the kitchen are enough. They make sufficient quantities of compost without finding more worm food. Gardeners and lawn enthusiasts need enough completed compost to nourish their plants. The composting worms are happy to oblige, and they will eat through a typical household kitchen’s scraps. However,

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What is the Reproductive Cycle of a Composting Red Worm?

One key to red worms’ reputation as superb composting worms is their ability to reproduce. A composting bin stocked with a couple of pounds of red worms can go a very long time without needing more worms added. If the worms are properly fed and cared for, they will make baby worms. What is the red worm’s reproductive cycle? Under what conditions will red worms reproduce? Red Worm Reproduction Red worms are hermaphrodites. They have reproductive organs that are both male and female. However, red worms cannot reproduce on their own. Jellyfish, flatworms, sea anemones, certain types of sharks, boa constrictors, certain insects, some rare reptiles, and chickens and turkeys are capable of reproduction without a mate. Worms need

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A Guide to Successful Indoor Composting with Worms

Vermicomposting can be done almost anywhere, indoors and out. Using worms to break down your food scraps is great for the environment. Composting results in a dark, rich fertilizer that is perfect for gardening. Composting indoors is a bit trickier, but it can be done successfully. Uncle Jim’s Worm Farm offers this easy-to-use guide to indoor composting with worms. Reasons why people compost indoors include: want convenient indoor access to the composting bin concern that composting worms outdoors won’t survive the winter (although they might lay eggs or could be replaced with a fresh bag of worms in the spring) want to continue strong composting program year-round, in spite of cold or heat apartment or city dweller with no yard no room on property for an outdoor bin It is possible to compost outdoors without

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How to Make a Chicken Wire Composter in 10 Minutes

If you are new to composting with worms, you will need a composter to house the bedding, worms and food scraps. The worms will usually stay put if you provide a secure abode for them to live in. They love dark, moist bedding and regular feedings of food scraps. After the worms have eaten scraps for a few months, you will be able to harvest the finished compost and use it on your garden, lawn, and indoor plants. Uncle Jim made this video about building a simple composter in just 10 minutes. It uses chicken wire, poles, and a bag of Red Worms from Uncle Jim’s Worm Farm. Watch it here:

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Finding the Right Mix of Food for Your Composting Worms

composting scraps

Composting worms will produce nutrient-rich fertilizer for your garden, but you need to feed them right. This is not difficult. Treat these invertebrates like little living creatures – which they are! Worms have likes and dislikes. Putting the right mix of food into your vermicomposting bin helps them do their job: turn trash into treasure. Let’s start with what composting worms dislike. They don’t like an acidic environment. Whatever you add to the worm bin becomes part of their environment. So, do not add acidic foods such as:

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Why are My Composting Worms Trying to Escape?

Worms in a vermicomposting bin sometimes try to escape. If it’s just one or two adventurous worms, you don’t have much to worry about. However, if you see worms clumping near the top of the bin, at the air ducts, or climbing out, something may be amiss. Let’s find out why composting worms try to escape, and what you can do about it. Note: Worms are sensitive to the weather. If a low pressure system or thunderstorm is moving in, the worms might start clumping and climbing. Watch for a while and see if this is the pattern. If so, do not worry. Need..Gasp..Oxygen Worms breathe through their skins. If they don’t have enough air, they will try to leave the bin. Lack of oxygen could be caused by:

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