Composting Worms Promote STEM in the School Classroom

A composting worms project at school provides many opportunities to teach STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) in the classroom. The school curriculum often covers the lifecycle of the earthworm. Students will retain more if they have hands-on experiences with the worms. A composting bin allows students to compost organic food waste generated at school. The composting process results in worm castings, a fertilizer for growing new plants. The project can easily pay for itself if the worm castings are put up for sale. Uncle Jim’s Worm Farm shows you how to get started with a classroom composting project. Customize the Project Teachers can pick-and-choose the scope of the project and which STEM elements to include. A minimal project would involve setting up a worm bin and depositing classroom waste. Many STEM elements can be included such as measuring trash volume before and during the project (math); worm anatomy;

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Foods That Can Hurt Composting Worms

Composting worms make food scraps break down quickly, but some foods can hurt them. Vermicomposting with worms is increasingly popular with people who want to reduce trash, produce free fertilizer, and save resources. Therefore, vermicomposting fans have a vested interest in keeping their Red Worms or European Night Crawlers healthy. Worms can break down a wide variety of organic materials, with a few exceptions. Uncle Jim’s Worm Farm explains which foods can hurt composting worms. In a Tight Space In the wild, worms will wiggle to a suitable food source. They have an entire smorgasbord outdoors. A composting bin is a tight space. We set up this

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How Do I Compost Fall Leaves with Worms?

When you rake the fall leaves, you are handling valuable organic material. If you compost these leaves, you will have free fertilizer in the spring! Leaves and other plant waste are the perfect food for composting worms. If you have a yard or garden of any size, you can capture these valuable nutrients by composting. Composting with worms, called “vermicomposting,” is fast and efficient. It’s easier than you might think! And you can start anytime. While your neighborhood might have leaf pickup, question where that material goes. Can you get free fertilizer from it in the Spring? Chances are that you cannot. You would likely have pay and pick up fertilizer during business hours. Keep the leaves working for you by composting in your own yard. Types of Composters You will need a location for your vermicomposting project. A variety of

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How to Grow Worms as Fishing Bait

The cost and inconvenience of buying live bait is a nuisance when fishing with worms. If you only need live worms occasionally, stopping by the bait shop is no big deal. However, frequent worm fishing requires a significant amount of live bait. You save time and money by keeping your own supply of worms on hand. As a pleasant side-effect, the worms generate compost that makes your plants grow strong. Uncle Jim’s Worm Farm offers three varieties of fishing worms and advice on cultivating each one. Types of Fishing Worms The three types of fishing worms we offer are: Mealworms European Night Crawlers (Super Reds) Red Worms (Red Wigglers) Draw on your expertise to decide which type of worm

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How to Compost with Worms in the Summer

Many composting enthusiasts worry about their composting worms dying in the summer heat. This is a rational fear. The worms are trapped in an enclosed bin, at the sun’s mercy. However, there are several easy ways to protect the worms from the heat. It’s Not Just the Heat The main problem with warm weather is not directly the heat. The primary problem is dryness. Worms breathe through their skin. If their skin dries out, they suffocate and die. Composting worms must remain moist. A worm laid out in the direct sun can die of suffocation in just three minutes. Worms get their moisture from their bedding. Heat causes evaporation. When the bedding gets dry, the worms cannot breathe as well. They may try

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The Anatomy of a Red Wiggler Composting Worm – Eisenia fetida

The best type of worms for your composter is the Red Worm (Red Wiggler). Their voracious appetites, medium size, and heartiness make them ideal composting worms. Falling into the genus “anulus,” meaning “ring” in Latin, the Eisenia fetida has up to 120 circular rings. The Red Worm Body On the outside of the red wiggler worm is the cuticle. Below this, the epidermis is skin-like tissue that sends information to the nerve tissue. Sensory information travels from layers of nerve tissue to the nerve cord. Data is processed in the cerebral ganglion, which is the worm equivalent of a brain. Ever notice the rings on a red worm? These rings

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Composting Worm Feeding Guide: Best and Worst Foods

What are the best foods to feed composting worms? What are the worst foods? People who compost with worms face these questions every day. Fortunately, Uncle Jim’s Worm Farm has this Worm Feeding Guide! Vermicomposting is easy if you know the right foods to feed the worms — and the foods to avoid. Qualities of Ideal Foods for Worms Composting worms are hungry for your kitchen left-overs, garden waste, and coffee grounds! The best foods for worms come from plants. This includes grains, fruits, vegetables, and beans. Plant matter is filled with nutrients and vitamins that worms need. Their excrement, called “humus,” contains digested nutrients and earth-friendly bacteria. Humus makes an ideal fertilizer for growing new plants. Worms do not have teeth. Their little mouths take in the

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How Vermicomposting Improves Soil Quality

The best fruits, vegetables, and decorative plants come from high-quality soil. Home-made compost is the most cost-effective way to improve soil quality in your garden. Generating your own compost using worms and scrap vegetation costs pennies per day. Let’s find out how vermicomposting improves soil quality. As soon as an apple hits the ground, the decay process begins. Nature’s cleanup crew includes microorganisms such as fungi and bacteria. Worms dig in. Eventually, the apple is gone, completely broken down into organic components that enrich the soil. When we compost kitchen and garden scraps, we are concentrating this process in a compost bin. The resulting finished compost is easy to harvest. We can then apply the compost to the soil, and grow new plants. The Parts of Soil To make plants grow strong, we need

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How to Raise Worms for Live Bait for Fishing

Are you a fishing enthusiast who loves using live fishing worms as bait? Are you tired of the cost and inconvenience of buying live bait? You can easily keep a stock of juicy worms at your fingertips by composting with worms. Your kitchen scraps are going to waste! They would make great food for your fishing worms. As a bonus, you will get plenty of free fertilizer for your garden, lawn, and indoor plants. It’s inexpensive to start, and it takes just a few minutes per week. Vermicomposting, or composting with worms, is a fairly popular household activity. The worms are kept securely in a composting bin. You can make a basic worm bin from a tote in minutes. Uncle Jim’s Worm Farm offers three types of worms: Red Worms Meal Worms (Darkling Beetle larvae), and Super Reds (European Night Crawlers) Are Red Worms for Fishing? Red worms, or Red Wiggler Mix, are

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What is the Reproductive Cycle of a Composting Red Worm?

One key to red worms’ reputation as superb composting worms is their ability to reproduce. A composting bin stocked with a couple of pounds of red worms can go a very long time without needing more worms added. If the worms are properly fed and cared for, they will make baby worms. What is the red worm’s reproductive cycle? Under what conditions will red worms reproduce? Red Worm Reproduction Red worms are hermaphrodites. They have reproductive organs that are both male and female. However, red worms cannot reproduce on their own. Jellyfish, flatworms, sea anemones, certain types of sharks, boa constrictors, certain insects, some rare reptiles, and chickens and turkeys are capable of reproduction without a mate. Worms need

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