Vermicomposting, Hot Composting or Cold Composting?

Composting is composting, right? Wrong! Let’s talk about three different types of composting: hot, cold, and vermicomposting. All these styles of composting break down organic matter. They all result in finished compost to use in your garden soil. However, they each require a different amount of labor from you. And they each take a different amount of time to start producing finished compost.

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Five Ways Kids Learn from Composting with Worms

Children and composting worms are a perfect match. Vermicomposting is both fun and educational. Uncle Jim’s Worm Farm is proud to announce its new Children’s Vermicomposting Kit. Made for small hands, this starter kit comes with 100 composting worms and a 2-gallon bin, plus accessories and a book. Already have a vermicomposting bin? Let them help, or get them their own Children’s Vermicomposting Kid. Having their own worms, bin, gardening tools, starter bedding, and instructions helps them take ownership of the project. Here are five ways kids absorb lessons when they compost with worms. Hands-On Learning You do not have to give a lengthy vermicomposting lecture. Kids learn a lot from doing. When setting up a bin, read through the instructions with them. Depending on their maturity, they might be able to set up the worm bin with a little guidance from you. Younger children will need more help.

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How to Grow a Butterfly Garden Using Compost

Are you excited about the idea of growing a garden that butterflies love? Looking forward to beautiful fluttering wings? If you want to attract butterflies, it’s not enough to offer the adult butterflies a bit of nectar. You must also create a garden that is hospitable for their offspring–caterpillars. Your plants will need nourishment. Organic finished compost is safe for both plants and insects. Start in advance by composting kitchen scraps. The fastest way to compost at home is to use composting worms. Uncle Jim’s Worm Farm has composting bins and composting worms to make plenty of finished compost. Nectar Isn’t Enough for Butterflies The mistake that many gardeners make is that they plant flowers that offer nectar for adult butterflies, then do nothing more. Like other creatures, butterflies are driven to eat and survive–and to reproduce as well. So in addition to finding a meal today, butterflies need to find plants that their future baby caterpillars can. When butterflies find those plants, they lay their eggs there.

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Vermicompost Holds Water: Tips On Watering Your Garden

Did you know that composting with worms can help keep your garden’s soil moist enough? Using composting worms to break down kitchen scraps results in vermicompost (literally: worm compost). Just by keeping a worm bin, you will have a ready supply of vermicompost to use in your garden. Vermicompost in the soil nourishes the plants and adds air pockets. The air pockets allow proper drainage, helping to regulate soil moisture. Most people are busy and want to be efficient about watering their plants. There are two main ways to save time watering plants. The first is to choose the right plants. The second is to improve water retention by adding compost to your soil. Choose Plants for Dry Areas If you have a spot in your yard that tends to be dry, or you live in a dry climate, choose plants that do well in dry areas. Otherwise, even watering multiple times a day may not be enough to keep your plants healthy.

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Composting Worms and Container Gardening

Container gardening means growing plants in containers instead of a garden bed. Composting worms can play a role in successful container gardening. Growing plants in containers instead of the ground solve many gardening problems. If you’re concerned about your soil, don’t have much space, or want to convert lawn into a garden bed, planting in containers may help. Just like any growing medium, the soil in container gardens will need fertilizer. The easiest and cheapest way is to start a separate bin that uses worms to break down kitchen scraps quickly. This is called “vermicomposting.” Vermicomposting results in worm castings (worm poop) that is more powerful than regular finished compost. This concentrated organic fertilizer is ideal for container gardens. And, once your worm bin is established, the fertilizer is free and self-replenishing. We recommend using a tray-based composting bin for convenience.

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Spring Is Coming! Get Your Worm Bin Ready for Spring Composting

As winter yields its grip and the weather begins to warm up, it’s time to prepare for productive composting. You will need to check what effect the Winter has had on your compost bin. Also, you need to take the necessary steps to bring it back to productivity. No doubt there will be organic fertilizer to be harvested and used on your garden. You might need to order worms and other supplies. Check Your Bin Do not disturb your outdoor worm bin until there is no chance of freezing weather! Otherwise your worm colony could be damaged. Search online for “last frost date” for your locale.

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How to Add Worm Castings to Your Garden and Lawn

Composting with worms results in highly nutritious worm castings. Your lawn and garden need nutrients to grow. Therefore, putting worm castings in the soil will help your plants grow strong. How do you harvest worm castings? Where can you apply them? Worm castings are also known as worm poop. Vermicomposting, or composting with worms, means maintaining a special bin filled with bedding and composting worms. We recommend Red Worms for most composting projects. If you also want fishing worms, then European Night Crawlers can do double-duty. Just feed your kitchen scraps and garden waste to the composting worms. They will eat through the organic material and produce fluffy, dark worm castings. Worm castings are also called “black gold” because they are the perfect soil amendment. Vermicomposting reduces waste and makes excellent organic fertilizer. Follow these steps to grow lush gardens and lawns.

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How to Break Compost Down Quickly

Many people explore composting as a great way to naturally dispose of food scraps. As a bonus, they get prime quality organic fertilizer in return. There are two main types of composting: hot composting and vermicomposting with worms. What are the differences? How are they similar? Which type is fastest? Composting Overview Hot composting is done outdoors, mostly in a rural environment. It is usually done in pits or bins away from any structures. On the other hand, you can have your vermicomposting bins both inside and outside whether you live in an apartment or in house. Bins can be placed in kitchens, closets, garages or on porches or anywhere outside where there are awnings. Vermicomposting bins come in an array of sizes, but 3′ by 3′ is highly recommended. This is the optimal size where the bin center heats to the right temperature for microbes to flourish while allowing maximum airflow.

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Great Gift Ideas From Uncle Jim’s Worm Farm

Are you looking for a unique gift that keeps giving the whole year ’round? Vermicomposting gifts from Uncle Jim’s Worm Farm are perfect for almost anyone! Vermicomposting means composting with worms. This speedy, low-odor method of composting turns trash into valuable compost. The compost helps plants grow strong. Composting is great for kids, families of any size, and singles. It reduces waste, which helps the environment. And vermicomposting only needs a small space, indoors or outdoors. Let’s see how Uncle Jim’s Worm Farm can answer some of your gift-giving needs. Who Can Compost with Worms The ideal gift recipient cooks food at home. Take-out food can be composted, but not if it is greasy. Also, vermicomposting is not suitable for a home that is mostly unoccupied. The worms can be left during a vacation, but not for a household that is often out-of-town.

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Worm Composting Odors: How to Keep Your Vermicomposting Bin Smelling Sweet

Seasoned vermicomposter enthusiasts know that when they smell a bad odor coming from their composting bins, something is out of balance. A healthy composting bin and the worms inside should have an earthy smell. The avid vermicomposter enthusiast also knows that whatever produces that horrible smell can be easily remedied. Before taking action, we need to identify the common causes underlying this stinky situation as described below: What Are You Feeding Your Worms? Did someone in your family accidentally slip oil, sauces, meat, bones, gristle, or dairy into the kitchen scraps? Foods of that nature can easily become rancid. Please avoid placing these scraps into the composting bin. Broccoli, cabbage, and even banana peels are also famous for causing a stench, especially if you compost indoors. If the smell from cruciferous vegetables bothers you, cut them into small pieces, and place sparingly into the bin. Avoid acidic foods, e.g., tomatoes, citrus, and pineapples, because they throw off the pH balance and can get your worms ill.

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