How to Prepare Your Outdoor Vermicomposting Bin for the Colder Weather

Now that the summer season is coming to a close, it’s time to prepare your outdoor vermicomposting bin for fall and winter. Despite the cold weather, you can continue composting and accumulating free natural organic fertilizer. Do you live in a warmer environment? If the temperature rarely drops below 57°F, your composting worms will slow down in wintertime, but they are not likely to die. For those who live in a colder climate, your worms will probably die should you not take the following preventive actions: The Easiest Solution – Bring a Vermicomposting Bin Indoors The best way to protect your worms from the ravages of freezing winter temperatures is to move them indoors. We offer several tray-based composters for both indoor and outdoor composting. Place the bin in a heated garage or basement so your worms can survive the cold. You can also put it in the kitchen or in a closet. In this way, the bin is close enough to add your food scraps rather than going outside in inclement weather. Don’t worry about flies, pests, odor, and mold. This only occurs should you not take care of your worms. Click to read articles about indoor vermicomposting bins.

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Is My Vermicomposting Bin Too Wet? What to Do?

When the smell coming from your vermicomposting bin is horrible, you know that something is wrong. With dread, your worst fears are realized when you look inside: the bin is wet. That does not bode well. Moisture levels are critical for your composting worms’ health. If it’s too wet inside, your worms can get sick. They can even drown. What should you do? Assess the Situation As a vermicomposting enthusiast, you are responsible for your worms’ well-being and their environment. You need to check their bedding’s moisture content regularly.

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How to Keep Your Composting Worms Cool in the Hot Summer

In the hot summer weather, your composting worms are at risk of getting overheated and dried out. They may even die. That’s because worms are unable to sweat. Outdoors in nature, worms beat the heat by burrowing deep into the soil. But your composting worms don’t have that option. They live in an artificial environment, the composting bin. As a master of their universe, you must ensure they stay healthy. This article is a guide as to how to prevent your worms from suffering in the summer heat.

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What To Do with Your Composting Worms While on Vacation

You just booked your hotel and flight for a long-anticipated vacation. Suddenly, the thought hits: “What should I do about my composting worms during my vacation?” You never left them alone for that long. Don’t worry. This article will guide you on how to prepare your vermicomposting worms while you’re out of town. Getting Your Composting Worms Ready We suggest you start a feeding schedule log for at least a week. You need to know how often you feed your worms and the amount of food that you add to the bin. You can either weigh the food or measure its volume in cups. Write down the information so that you can refer to it later. This brings up another question, perhaps one you never realized before: how do you know that your worms are fed the right amount? Check to see whether they have started breaking down the food you fed them the last time. That will give you an indication of your worms’ appetite and feeding amount. When they have started breaking down the last feeding, it’s time to feed them again. We recommend that you feed your worms approximately every two to three days. Each feeding should be completely broken down in about a week or so. How to Prepare Food for When You are Not Home Smaller pieces of food break down faster than larger ones. Too many large pieces of food in the bin could stink it up, introduce flies, and may even get your …

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Vermicomposting for the Avid Beginner

What is vermicomposting? “Vermi-” means “relating to worms.” Therefore, vermicomposting means composting with worms. It’s the art of feeding worms your food scraps. The worms turn your trash into nutrient-rich organic fertilizer. This fertilizer is also known as humus, worm castings, worm manure, or worm feces. The resulting fertilizer is perfect for gardens, lawns, and potted plants. How to start vermicomposting? This article addresses several basic materials you will need and where to get the worms. You will be using Red Worms if you want the most efficient composters. Or you can use Super Reds (European Night Crawlers) if you also want them for fishing bait. Uncle Jim’s Worm Farm has all the knowledge you will need to succeed at vermicomposting. Let’s Start With the Composting Bin The best bin for vermicomposting uses trays. Tray-based composting bins are easy to maintain and harvest. You will not have to do any heavy lifting, and harvesting the fertilizer is a snap. Check out Uncle Jim’s Worm Farm’s selections of tray-based composting bins. Each comes with instructions, and some include the worms.

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The Life Cycle of Vermicomposting Red Worms

Vermicomposting worms follow a similar life cycle pattern as humans: birth, growth, procreation, and death. In this article, we examine the life cycle of the popular earthworm: Red Wigglers, the Kings of Vermicomposting. These worms are distinctly different from humans when it comes to reproduction. For example, there are no “boy” red worms or “girl” red worms. We find worms fascinating and are grateful for the rich organic fertilizer that they produce from our table scraps. Red Wigglers’ Reproductive Organs Worms possess both male and female reproductive sex organs. These organs are contained in a bulbous gland called a clitellum. The clitellum is located outside the worm’s body. Although difficult for us to see, it resembles a ring. When the worm is fertile, the clitellum advertises to potential mates. That’s because it becomes visible and turns orange, a signal that all’s clear for making babies. Even though Red Worms are hermaphrodites, they do require another partner to exchange genetic material. In other words, they can’t do it alone. Reproduction the Red Wigglers Way Red Worms typically prefer to reproduce in warmer temperatures. They line up side-by-side. The clitellum of each worm secretes mucus and albumin. The worms exchange sperm. When the exchange of genetic material is complete, they separate. The act of separating causes the sperm to mix with eggs, fertilizing them. Then, the worm wiggles out of its clitellum. This forms a cocoon to safely host the fertilized eggs. As the cocoon is deposited on the ground, it automatically …

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Vermicomposting Worms, Breathing, and Worm Bins

How do vermicomposting worms breathe in their bins? Why do their skins need moisture? How can we make the most of their environment to keep it airy and moist enough for them? Unlike humans, composting worms don’t have noses and mouths to inhale air. Nor do they have lungs. Yet, they do breathe. In fact, their entire skin acts like lungs where they absorb oxygen into their bloodstream. And, they release carbon dioxide the same way. But that’s not all. Their skin requires moisture to breathe. Worms, like humans, are made of a high percentage of water. That’s why moisture is crucial. The best way to take help your worms breathe is to use the following time-tested practices:

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Springtime and Vermicomposting

Spring is the perfect time to prepare your vermicomposting worms for the upcoming warmer weather. You need to make sure the worms are breaking down accumulated scraps. When do you need to add fresh adult worms to speed things along? When should you harvest the worm castings, and how? How do you use organic compost? Do you need a different compost bin? Should you add bedding, and how? Find out the answers to these questions and more below. What is the First Step? Once it gets warmer with no chance of frost, check out your composting bin. It’s the best way to plan for the revival of your mostly dormant composting worms. You need to take stock of your worm inventory.

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Best Bedding for Your Composting Worms

What is the best bedding for your composting worms? At Uncle Jim’s Worm Farm, we want you to enjoy your vermicomposting experience. For that reason, we recommend Red Worms. They’re the best worms for composting. That’s because these worms love devouring kitchen scraps. In return, they produce humus, the prized organic fertilizer perfect for gardens. To start your composting bin, you need to make bedding. Bedding is your worms’ world. It needs to simulate their natural environment. How do you do that? We prepared several simple guidelines. Follow these guidelines and your worms will be very happy.

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Do Not Feed This To Your Composting Worms

What should you NOT feed your composting worms? At Uncle Jim’s Worm Farm, we supply our customers with the finest composting worms. We recommend our quality Red Worms or European Night Crawlers for vermicomposting. Vermicomposting is a great way to get rid of organic waste. It’s good for the environment and produces valuable compost for plants. We want to make sure that not only are our customers happy, but also our worms. Healthy worms make for the most effective composting.

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