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How to Make a Wood Pallet Composting Bin

When you want compost outdoors, a very inexpensive bin can be made from wood pallets. These large wooden rectangles easy to find at local stores, warehouses and any business that receives shipments by truck. Reusing pallets reduces waste and saves money. All you need is a little elbow grease, a few tools, and some inexpensive supplies. When your composter is finished, you can start a productive composting program. Adding composting worms makes the composting process go faster. Soon, you will have free compost to help your garden and lawn grow. To start, find a location for your worm bin. Put it a short distance from the

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How Whole Foods Market Reduces Waste by Composting

Since Whole Foods Market’s founding in Austin, Texas in 1980, this grocery store chain has shown a commitment to saving the planet. The US’s first certified organic grocer, Whole Foods sells only food free of hydrogenated fats, with no artificial preservatives, colors, flavors, and sweeteners. They have grown to more than 431 supermarkets in North America and the United Kingdom. In addition to offering packaged items, the stores feature organic produce, deli food, natural body care products, salad bars, and cafes. Whole Food Market aims to reduce waste in each store. One major component of waste reduction is composting. They were pioneers in developing large-scale composting programs in their stores. In any grocery store, there is wasted packaging and food scraps. Most merchandise arrives

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Indoor Composting with Worms: 4 Tips from Uncle Jim

Vermicomposting is a great way to reduce trash and make free fertilizer. Composting worms will eat most of the inedible scraps from the kitchen, as well as many left-overs. This is better for the environment than tossing it into the trash. The result is dark, rich organic fertilizer. Worm excrement is treasured by gardeners because it helps plants grow. While most composting is done outdoors, you can run a successful composting program indoors. Some worm owners move operations indoors during the winter. Others do indoor composting year-round for convenience or due to lack of suitable outdoor space. Uncle Jim’s Worm Farm has these four tips for successful indoor composting.

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How to Avoid Over-Feeding Composting Worms

If you are composting with worms, you need to feed them the right quantity of food scraps. How much food is too much? Over-feeding your composting worms can cause problems in the bin, including odors, acidity, excess moisture, pests and sick worms. What should you do to prevent and address these issues? Here are Uncle Jim’s guidelines for feeding the right amount of scraps to composting worms. Quick Check: How Much Food is In There? Dig around in the bin. How much undigested organic material is in there? The worms should start working on a feeding within a few days and finish it within 1 to 2 weeks. If you see large amounts of food, you are probably overfeeding. Under ideal conditions, worms can eat their weight in scraps per day. So if you have 1 pound of worms, you can theoretically feed them 1 pounds of scraps. However, we recommend you play it safe by feeding an amount they can handle every 2 or 3 days. Over-Feeding Causes Odors The most noticeable sign of overfeeding is a foul odor. Worm bins should have an earthy smell. If your nose is offended, your worm bin needs improvement. The worms’ job is to eat the

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A Guide to Successful Indoor Composting with Worms

Vermicomposting can be done almost anywhere, indoors and out. Using worms to break down your food scraps is great for the environment. Composting results in a dark, rich fertilizer that is perfect for gardening. Composting indoors is a bit trickier, but it can be done successfully. Uncle Jim’s Worm Farm offers this easy-to-use guide to indoor composting with worms. Reasons why people compost indoors include: want convenient indoor access to the composting bin concern that composting worms outdoors won’t survive the winter (although they might lay eggs or could be replaced with a fresh bag of worms in the spring) want to continue strong composting program year-round, in spite of cold or heat apartment or city dweller with no yard no room on property for an outdoor bin It is possible to compost outdoors without

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Composting with Worms in Cold Weather

When the weather is cold, your worm outdoor composting program might need some adjustments. Worm are living creatures that can be harmed by low temperatures. You can choose not to worry about it, or you can take steps to protect the worms. Either way, your composting program can continue throughout the winter. If you let nature take its course, your worms might expire. The center bottom of your worm bin will probably be the warmest part. They will likely migrate there. The decomposition process generates some heat. However, if you live anywhere in the northern United States, chances are the worms won’t make it. It is possible your worms will have laid eggs. These hardy eggs can survive the cold temperatures. If you don’t see many worms in

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Uncle Jim’s Worm Farm Featured in Sports Section of the Washington Post

The Washington Post ran an article about the family that owns and operates Uncle Jim’s Worm Farm. Placed in the Sports section, Roman Stubbs’ article analyzed football player David Shaw, whose father Jim Shaw started selling worms 40 years ago. Jim grew up on a farm in Connecticut. He started raising fishing worms from the age of 8, at first for pocket money. Eventually, worm farming grew into a full-time business. Jim played football for Colgate, and moved to his own farm in Spring Grove, Pennsylvania. He bred Red Worms for composting, and European Night Crawlers for aeration. All of these made good fishing worms. He added mealworms for pet owners, bird

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How to Make a Chicken Wire Composter in 10 Minutes

If you are new to composting with worms, you will need a composter to house the bedding, worms and food scraps. The worms will usually stay put if you provide a secure abode for them to live in. They love dark, moist bedding and regular feedings of food scraps. After the worms have eaten scraps for a few months, you will be able to harvest the finished compost and use it on your garden, lawn, and indoor plants. Uncle Jim made this video about building a simple composter in just 10 minutes. It uses chicken wire, poles, and a bag of Red Worms from Uncle Jim’s Worm Farm. Watch it here:

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Worm Blankets and Lids: Best Coverings for Your Worm Bin

Composting with worms usually involves covering the bin to control moisture. Worms respond to their environment. If their world is too wet or too dry, they will be less productive and possibly even die. Composting with worms is a great way to turn kitchen and gardening scraps to into valuable fertilizer. One key to success is finding the best covering for your worm bin. Worm bins can be indoors or outdoors. Indoor composting systems are typically small, tray-based plastic composters, such as the Worm Factory 360 (which can also go outside). The Worm Farm Kit and bins made from plastic totes can be used indoors or outdoors. Outdoors composters can be tray-based, or large bins. These can be made from plastic, wooden pallets, lumber, or chicken wire. Coverings for Indoor Composters Indoor composters are not subject to the same temperature and

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