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Composting & Recycling: Sustainable Zero-Waste Event Planning

A typical convention, marathon, conference, wedding reception, large party, horse show, festival, or trade show produces huge amounts of trash. With careful event planning, the amount of trash generated can be dramatically reduced. This helps save resources and reduces cleanup time. Zero-waste events redirect organic matter into composting programs and move plastic, metal, glass and cardboard into recycling programs. Event planners can do the math. Typically, it’s less expensive to prevent waste and separate out useful materials than it is to

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Help Your Composting Worms Keep Their Cool in the Hot Summer

In the summertime, things start heating up in your outdoor worm composting bin. Unfortunately, if the bin temperature gets too high, the composting worms will overheat, dry out and die. There are many things you can do to keep your worm population cool enough to survive. Placing the worm bin in the right location is the most important way to control the internal temperature. Exposure to the sun heats the bin up more quickly than you might think. So keeping your bin out of the sun will keep the temperature down. Pick a spot that is shady for the entire day. Try placing it under an awning or shed roof, under a shady tree or next to tall bushes. Just don’t place it right up against the house, or local vermin might get the wrong idea and start muscling in on your home. Depending on the type of bin, you may need to provide

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Why are My Composting Worms Trying to Escape?

Worms in a vermicomposting bin sometimes try to escape. If it’s just one or two adventurous worms, you don’t have much to worry about. However, if you see worms clumping near the top of the bin, at the air ducts, or climbing out, something may be amiss. Let’s find out why composting worms try to escape, and what you can do about it. Note: Worms are sensitive to the weather. If a low pressure system or thunderstorm is moving in, the worms might start clumping and climbing. Watch for a while and see if this is the pattern. If so, do not worry. Need..Gasp..Oxygen Worms breathe through their skins. If they don’t have enough air, they will try to leave the bin. Lack of oxygen could be caused by:

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How to Screen Compost – Separate Fertilizer from Worms, Sticks, and Debris

In this article and video, Uncle Jim’s Worm Farm gives you step-by-step instructions for screening compost. Screening compost is a common way of improving the quality of finished compost. After kitchen scraps and gardening waste has been broken down over several months, it’s almost ready to be applied to the garden. Running it through a screen has many benefits: removes sticks, debris, produce stickers and uncomposted food scraps adds air breaks down clumps into fine pieces removes composting worms, so they can be returned to the composting bin The finer the compost, the better. Good growing soil is loose and fluffy, with plenty of air

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How to Make a Screen to Separate Worms from Compost

If you have been composting with worms, you will occasionally want to harvest those valuable worm castings. This completed compost is rich in nutrients and perfect for the garden. Completed compost helps plants grow strong. One way easy to separate the worms from the compost is to use a screen. Here at Uncle Jim’s Worm Farm, we use more sophisticated machines to separate hundreds of thousands of worms a week. For

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Tiny Houses Adopt Composting Toilets with Worms

If you are planning to build a tiny house, you will need to make a decision about the toilet. Does the idea of scurrying to an external restroom in the cold and dark bother you? Not interested in emptying a chamber pot? Many tiny houses are designed to have an internal toilet for these reasons. Your two choices are a composting toilet or a flush toilet. Depending on how often the tiny house is moved, where it is located and how cold it gets, indoor plumbing can be problematic. You may be required to establish a septic tank or connect to a sewage system. If you are motivated to solve these problems and get a flush toilet operational, go for it. But first, find out the advantages of a composting toilet. Many tiny home owners opt for a composting toilet. Some advantages

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Community Garden Composting: Why and How

Community gardening projects are popping up all over. Setting up a garden helps bring the neighborhood together, makes use of wasted space, improves air quality, provides food for insects and birds, and produces fresh food. If you are involved in setting up a community garden, you need to include a system for composting leftover vegetation. Uncle Jim’s Worm Farm offers these ideas and instructions for establishing functional and safe composting systems. Why Your Community Garden Needs a Composting System If this is the first time you are gardening on this scale,

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Composting Food Service Dinnerware & Cutlery

The food service industry is starting to save resources by composting. Organic matter like kitchen scraps and wasted food can be composted. Certain types of food service items like dinnerware, cutlery, cups and straws can also be composted. Institutions and restaurant, as well as consumers, are learning how to help save resources by reducing waste. Disposable plates, bowls, cups, knives, and forks are definitely convenient. They may be preferred over washable, durable, re-usable dinnerware and cutlery for several reasons. Some places – especially schools – lose too many items to pilfering. Sometimes it’s just cheaper to provide disposable items instead of stocking,

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Small-Scale Composting with Worms: Vermiculture in the City

Turning kitchen scraps into valuable fertilizer might sound unrealistic to a household in the city. Aren’t composters usually on a large piece of land? No! Vermiculture means using worms to break down food scraps. Their stealth and speed mean you can compost right in your kitchen, balcony or rooftop! Small-scale vermiculture is one way that an urban dweller can help save the environment. It also creates excellent fertilizer for plants, and it’s a fun project. The problem with tossing kitchen scraps in the trash is that mixed garbage stinks! It attracts pests and takes energy to get moved out of the city. Once it has been hauled away, that trash either goes to a landfill or an incinerator. Neither is good for the environment. Landfills waste space and generate methane, a greenhouse gas. Incinerators pollute the air and produce toxic ash.

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The Differences Between Biogas and Composting for Managing Organic Waste

Both biogas and composting turn wasted organic material into something useful. Biogas makes methane, which is collected and burned to generate electricity. Composting makes organic fertilizer, which is used by gardeners, golf course managers and farmers to grow plants. Let’s dig into depth about their similarities and differences. Scale: All Sizes Both systems can work on any scale. Biogas is usually done on a large scale by a municipality or energy company. Some adventurous households tackle it themselves with DIY biogas generators. Composting can be done on a small scale in a household, for an entire apartment building or campus, or on a massive municipal basis. Inputs: Similar Both processes need organic matter, such as kitchen scraps, left-over vegetables

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