Worm Composting Odors: How to Keep Your Vermicomposting Bin Smelling Sweet

Seasoned vermicomposter enthusiasts know that when they smell a bad odor coming from their composting bins, something is out of balance. A healthy composting bin and the worms inside should have an earthy smell. The avid vermicomposter enthusiast also knows that whatever produces that horrible smell can be easily remedied. Before taking action, we need to identify the common causes underlying this stinky situation as described below: What Are You Feeding Your Worms? Did someone in your family accidentally slip oil, sauces, meat, bones, gristle, or dairy into the kitchen scraps? Foods of that nature can easily become rancid. Please avoid placing these scraps into the composting bin. Broccoli, cabbage, and even banana peels are also famous for causing a stench, especially if you compost indoors. If the smell from cruciferous vegetables bothers you, cut them into small pieces, and place sparingly into the bin. Avoid acidic foods, e.g., tomatoes, citrus, and pineapples, because they throw off the pH balance and can get your worms ill.

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What is Hot Composting Versus Vermicomposting

Many vermicomposting enthusiasts know about a technique to break down organic waste to produce fertilizer without using worms: hot composting. Although both produce organic fertilizer, there are many differences. The type of bin, location of the bin, setup, and day-to-day feedings are not the same. Also, the resulting organic fertilizer from worms is different than from hot composting. First, let’s explore hot composting, especially for those individuals unfamiliar with this method.

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Top Five Best Foods for Composting Worms

Vermicomposting enthusiasts agree overall on what to feed their worms. In this article, we add our subjective twist as to the top five best foods to make your worms thrive. You want to keep your worms happy and healthy so they can produce lots of natural, organic fertilizer. People who cultivate lawns, shrubs, and flowers love the “black gold” fertilizer from vermicomposting. Before we list the top five best foods, we need to list the WORST foods.

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Why Tray-Based Composters are Best for Worm Castings

Why do people use specialized tray-based composters for composting with worms? Why not just use a regular, deep composting bin from the hardware store? Many vermicomposting projects are for small-scale households. They want to turn their kitchen scraps into free fertilizer: worm castings, also called “black gold.” Black gold that nourishes plants, flowers, shrubs, trees, and lawns. Composting scraps reduces waste volume and odors in the household. A busy household looks for convenience and cleanliness. Tray-based composting bins foot the bill!

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Vermicomposting Worms, Breathing, and Worm Bins

How do vermicomposting worms breathe in their bins? Why do their skins need moisture? How can we make the most of their environment to keep it airy and moist enough for them? Unlike humans, composting worms don’t have noses and mouths to inhale air. Nor do they have lungs. Yet, they do breathe. In fact, their entire skin acts like lungs where they absorb oxygen into their bloodstream. And, they release carbon dioxide the same way. But that’s not all. Their skin requires moisture to breathe. Worms, like humans, are made of a high percentage of water. That’s why moisture is crucial. The best way to take help your worms breathe is to use the following time-tested practices:

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Springtime and Vermicomposting

Spring is the perfect time to prepare your vermicomposting worms for the upcoming warmer weather. You need to make sure the worms are breaking down accumulated scraps. When do you need to add fresh adult worms to speed things along? When should you harvest the worm castings, and how? How do you use organic compost? Do you need a different compost bin? Should you add bedding, and how? Find out the answers to these questions and more below. What is the First Step? Once it gets warmer with no chance of frost, check out your composting bin. It’s the best way to plan for the revival of your mostly dormant composting worms. You need to take stock of your worm inventory.

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Best Bedding for Your Composting Worms

What is the best bedding for your composting worms? At Uncle Jim’s Worm Farm, we want you to enjoy your vermicomposting experience. For that reason, we recommend Red Worms. They’re the best worms for composting. That’s because these worms love devouring kitchen scraps. In return, they produce humus, the prized organic fertilizer perfect for gardens. To start your composting bin, you need to make bedding. Bedding is your worms’ world. It needs to simulate their natural environment. How do you do that? We prepared several simple guidelines. Follow these guidelines and your worms will be very happy.

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Do Not Feed This To Your Composting Worms

What should you NOT feed your composting worms? At Uncle Jim’s Worm Farm, we supply our customers with the finest composting worms. We recommend our quality Red Worms or European Night Crawlers for vermicomposting. Vermicomposting is a great way to get rid of organic waste. It’s good for the environment and produces valuable compost for plants. We want to make sure that not only are our customers happy, but also our worms. Healthy worms make for the most effective composting.

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How Do Composting Worms Survive the Cold Winter?

Composting worms help break down food scraps, but how do they survive the cold winter? Any vermicomposting bin set up in a northern state is likely to freeze. Will all the worms die? Should you try to save them? If the worms die, will there still be worm castings for fertilizer in the Spring? Should you bring them indoors?

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