Which Peat Moss is Safe for Vermicomposting Bedding?

Peat moss makes excellent bedding for a vermicomposting bin, but how can you tell if a bag of peat moss is safe for your composting worms? Many people new to vermicomposting ask whether they should add peat moss that contains additional ingredients. The bag might say it “feeds” with a chemical fertilizer, such as Miracle-Gro. What does “sphagnum” mean? What about bagged potting mixes? Let’s examine some basics of vermiculture before we respond to these questions. What is Vermicomposting? Vermicomposting is the natural and organic method of disposing of kitchen scraps and garden waste. Order Red Worms or European Night Crawlers from Uncle Jim’s Worm Farm, and keep them in a special worm bin. Feed them every few days. The foods you feed your worms should be, generally speaking, non-citrus fruits and non-acidic vegetables. Do NOT feed them dairy, meats, and anything made with preservatives and chemicals. All fruits and veggies must be cleansed of any oils, dressings, seasonings, and spices. They should be cut up in small pieces. You feed your worms well and, in turn, they will produce prize fertilizer for your gardens, lawns, and shrubs. Please refer to our articles on feeding worms: Top Five Best Foods for Composting Worms and Foods That Can Hurt Composting Worms.

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Five Ways Kids Learn from Composting with Worms

Children and composting worms are a perfect match. Vermicomposting is both fun and educational. Uncle Jim’s Worm Farm is proud to announce its new Children’s Vermicomposting Kit. Made for small hands, this starter kit comes with 100 composting worms and a 2-gallon bin, plus accessories and a book. Already have a vermicomposting bin? Let them help, or get them their own Children’s Vermicomposting Kid. Having their own worms, bin, gardening tools, starter bedding, and instructions helps them take ownership of the project. Here are five ways kids absorb lessons when they compost with worms. Hands-On Learning You do not have to give a lengthy vermicomposting lecture. Kids learn a lot from doing. When setting up a bin, read through the instructions with them. Depending on their maturity, they might be able to set up the worm bin with a little guidance from you. Younger children will need more help.

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Container Gardening Using Vermicompost

When you think of container gardening, you probably think of flowers. Surprise! You can also grow herbs, vegetables, shrubs, and even trees in containers! Basics of Container Gardening Find out the needs of your plant and make sure to give it what it needs. Choose a location that has the right amount of sun for that specific plant. Select a container with drainage holes. Make sure your container provides enough space for the plants’ roots. Some plants, such as parsley and leaf lettuce, can be planted in shallow bowls just six inches deep. At the other end of the spectrum, small trees need a 15-gallon container, which is about 16 inches wide and 16 inches deep. Water as often as needed. Smaller containers will need to be watered more often than larger containers. If you get cold winters, the roots of perennials, trees, and shrubs in containers could freeze and be damaged. You may need to move these containers to a sheltered spot during the coldest season. Use a light soil mix in your containers.

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Composting Worms and Container Gardening

Container gardening means growing plants in containers instead of a garden bed. Composting worms can play a role in successful container gardening. Growing plants in containers instead of the ground solve many gardening problems. If you’re concerned about your soil, don’t have much space, or want to convert lawn into a garden bed, planting in containers may help. Just like any growing medium, the soil in container gardens will need fertilizer. The easiest and cheapest way is to start a separate bin that uses worms to break down kitchen scraps quickly. This is called “vermicomposting.” Vermicomposting results in worm castings (worm poop) that is more powerful than regular finished compost. This concentrated organic fertilizer is ideal for container gardens. And, once your worm bin is established, the fertilizer is free and self-replenishing. We recommend using a tray-based composting bin for convenience.

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Get Through Tough Times by Composting with Worms

“Waste Not, Want Not” is a wise attitude during tough times. Is money tight? Are resources scarce? Growing your own food provides inexpensive nutrition, under your control. Throwing away kitchen scraps is wasteful. You could use composting worms to turn trash into organic fertilizer. This fertilizer will help plants grow strong, without added chemicals. And, once your worm composting system is set up, the fertilizer is free! Worms come to the rescue when you need “back to basics.” Where to Grow Food Suburban and urban dwellers should have no problem finding a piece of land to grow vegetables and fruit. Even a small plot will make a difference.

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How to Break Compost Down Quickly

Many people explore composting as a great way to naturally dispose of food scraps. As a bonus, they get prime quality organic fertilizer in return. There are two main types of composting: hot composting and vermicomposting with worms. What are the differences? How are they similar? Which type is fastest? Composting Overview Hot composting is done outdoors, mostly in a rural environment. It is usually done in pits or bins away from any structures. On the other hand, you can have your vermicomposting bins both inside and outside whether you live in an apartment or in house. Bins can be placed in kitchens, closets, garages or on porches or anywhere outside where there are awnings. Vermicomposting bins come in an array of sizes, but 3′ by 3′ is highly recommended. This is the optimal size where the bin center heats to the right temperature for microbes to flourish while allowing maximum airflow.

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Great Gift Ideas From Uncle Jim’s Worm Farm

Are you looking for a unique gift that keeps giving the whole year ’round? Vermicomposting gifts from Uncle Jim’s Worm Farm are perfect for almost anyone! Vermicomposting means composting with worms. This speedy, low-odor method of composting turns trash into valuable compost. The compost helps plants grow strong. Composting is great for kids, families of any size, and singles. It reduces waste, which helps the environment. And vermicomposting only needs a small space, indoors or outdoors. Let’s see how Uncle Jim’s Worm Farm can answer some of your gift-giving needs. Who Can Compost with Worms The ideal gift recipient cooks food at home. Take-out food can be composted, but not if it is greasy. Also, vermicomposting is not suitable for a home that is mostly unoccupied. The worms can be left during a vacation, but not for a household that is often out-of-town.

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Adding a Worm Blanket to Your Vermicomposting Bin

Whether your vermicomposting bin is situated indoors or outdoors, you should consider adding a worm blanket. Even though most bins are already equipped with a lid, a worm blanket comes in handy. It helps maintain moisture, protects your worms from the elements, and keeps the bin dark. This article will help clarify any questions you may have about coverings. What is the Purpose of the Lid on a Vermicomposting Bin? Whether your vermicomposting bin is indoors or outdoors, you usually need a lid. Lids for indoor bins serve many functions: Isolate odors from within Deter insects such as fruit flies Discourages dogs from foraging in the bin Retains moisture Helps regulate the internal bin and bedding temperature Keeps the worm bin dark, which is the way worms like it

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Worm Composting Odors: How to Keep Your Vermicomposting Bin Smelling Sweet

Seasoned vermicomposter enthusiasts know that when they smell a bad odor coming from their composting bins, something is out of balance. A healthy composting bin and the worms inside should have an earthy smell. The avid vermicomposter enthusiast also knows that whatever produces that horrible smell can be easily remedied. Before taking action, we need to identify the common causes underlying this stinky situation as described below: What Are You Feeding Your Worms? Did someone in your family accidentally slip oil, sauces, meat, bones, gristle, or dairy into the kitchen scraps? Foods of that nature can easily become rancid. Please avoid placing these scraps into the composting bin. Broccoli, cabbage, and even banana peels are also famous for causing a stench, especially if you compost indoors. If the smell from cruciferous vegetables bothers you, cut them into small pieces, and place sparingly into the bin. Avoid acidic foods, e.g., tomatoes, citrus, and pineapples, because they throw off the pH balance and can get your worms ill.

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What is Hot Composting Versus Vermicomposting

Many vermicomposting enthusiasts know about a technique to break down organic waste to produce fertilizer without using worms: hot composting. Although both produce organic fertilizer, there are many differences. The type of bin, location of the bin, setup, and day-to-day feedings are not the same. Also, the resulting organic fertilizer from worms is different than from hot composting. First, let’s explore hot composting, especially for those individuals unfamiliar with this method.

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