How to Grow Worms as Fishing Bait

The cost and inconvenience of buying live bait is a nuisance when fishing with worms. If you only need live worms occasionally, stopping by the bait shop is no big deal. However, frequent worm fishing requires a significant amount of live bait. You save time and money by keeping your own supply of worms on hand. As a pleasant side-effect, the worms generate compost that makes your plants grow strong. Uncle Jim’s Worm Farm offers three varieties of fishing worms and advice on cultivating each one. Types of Fishing Worms The three types of fishing worms we offer are: Mealworms European Night Crawlers (Super Reds) Red Worms (Red Wigglers) Draw on your expertise to decide which type of worm

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How to Feed Mealworms to Wild Birds

Bird lovers are always looking for a way to capture their backyard wild birds’ interest. Mealworms make a terrific treat. Whether the mealworms are live or dried, they are nutritious and popular with most outdoor birds. Why feed wild birds mealworms? How often? Which types of birdfeeders are best for mealworms? And how do you store mealworms? Benefits of Feeding Meal Worms to Wild Birds Mealworms are the larvae stage of the Darkling Beetle. These cream-colored grubs are high in fat and protein. Wild birds need extra fat in winter to stay warm. They need extra protein when they are: young and growing laying on feathers preparing to lay eggs feeding chicks In a pinch, new parents will feed seeds

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Uncle Jim’s Worm Farm Featured in Sports Section of the Washington Post

The Washington Post ran an article about the family that owns and operates Uncle Jim’s Worm Farm. Placed in the Sports section, Roman Stubbs’ article analyzed football player David Shaw, whose father Jim Shaw started selling worms 40 years ago. Jim grew up on a farm in Connecticut. He started raising fishing worms from the age of 8, at first for pocket money. Eventually, worm farming grew into a full-time business. Jim played football for Colgate, and moved to his own farm in Spring Grove, Pennsylvania. He bred Red Worms for composting, and European Night Crawlers for aeration. All of these made good fishing worms. He added mealworms for pet owners, bird

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How To’s On Feeding Red Worms to Chickens

  I know there are a lot of chicken lovers out there, and some of them may be asking the same question; Is it a good idea to feed red worms to chickens? The answer is, yes; feeding Red Worms (or mealworms but that is a different story) to chickens is an excellent idea. Red Wiggler worms are not only good composting worms, but  they can also be used as a protein rich, nutrient packed animal food (i.e., chicken feed). Now, if you’re thinking about growing your own worms for convenience, then go right ahead. Just know that there is a downside; it takes quite a bit of time and dedication for this self sustaining food source to multiply enough to keep up with demand of your hungry livestock. However, even with the time and energy that goes into the worm farm, you will find it to be very cost effective in the long run. You will be making fewer trips to the feed store which is not only going to save you money but also allow you more time to spend with your precious chickens!  So when you’re keeping chickens, try to invest in keeping  a worm farm as well.

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Which Type of Worm Do I Need?

A worm is a worm is a worm. Or not! You may not have thought about it, but there are lots of types of worms out there. Here at Uncle Jim’s Worm Farm, we sell three main types of worms: Red Wigglers for composting; Super Reds for composting, releasing into the soil and fishing; and live Mealworms for animal feed. How do you choose which type of worm to buy? Well, it depends on what you want do with them. Choose Red Wigglers for Composting If you are composting, you should be thinking about buying Uncle Jim’s Red Wigglers. Red wigglers are Uncle Jim’s flagship worm–a small but mighty powerhouse when it comes to chewing through your compostable waste. Red wigglers are only about 1-3 inches long and the diameter of a pencil lead, but they can easily turn piles of vegetable scraps into excellent garden fertilizer. Red Wigglers don’t tend to dig deep–they are adapted to chewing up vegetable matter and animal manure in the top layer of soil. So being in a compost bin where their bedding and food scraps are only a few inches deep doesn’t offend them. They are also right at home processing bedding and manure from herbivores, such as rabbits. If you are composting indoors, Red Wigglers are highly recommended. If your compost bin or pile is outdoors, Red Wigglers are also superior; however, you may need to make a little extra effort to keep them healthy in extreme temperatures. This is because they …

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Composting Worms Species Disclaimer

We cannot guarantee a 100% pure species of any type composting worms. Our worms are harvested from worm beds that are decades old and may depending of time of year contain several different compost worm species. Not to worry!  Bed run worms are superior because they work all layers of the compost not just the top few inches. Giving you a better compost faster. This also gives an advantage in that as conditions change certain species will multiply as conditions become unfavorable for another keeping you with a constantly healthy composter.  Because they are bed run some orders may have more than one species than another but rest assured their populations will naturally adjust to the needs of your waste. Because of the adaptive nature of worms some varieties reproductive rates change with warmer weather, colder weather, moisture levels, soil content etc. Different species of Worms perform distinct jobs. Some will burrow horizontally, while others will burrow vertically, some to a depth of twelve feet. Aporrectodea caliginosa – the common pasture earthworm Dendrobaena veneta – the European night crawler Amynrthus Gracilus – Alabama Jumper Eisenia fetida – the manure worm. Perionyx excavatus – The blue worm. Eisenia Andrei – the Red Tiger worm Lumbricus terrestris – the common night crawler or dew worm. Lumbricus rubellus* – the red marsh worm. Commonly found in places rich in organic matter and moisture such as gardens and pastures. The reproductive habits of different species of earthworms will vary. For example, the Aporrectodea caliginos …

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Why Worms Make Great Pets

Disclaimer: This article is meant all in good fun. There are many emotional, practical and entertainment advantages to furry and feathered pets. This article is meant to educate you about composting worms by comparing and contrasting them to furry/feathered pets. Enjoy! Composting worms make great pets because they are no trouble at all. Stocking a worm farm costs less than $50, but pays off in unlimited free compost for your garden. While worms are not fluffy or affectionate, they come with fewer problems than other pets. The average cost of owning a pet like a dog over its lifetime can range from $4000 to $38,000. But worms are relatively cheap to buy. And you generally get a thousand of them at a time. Worms don’t need to be neutered or spayed. And they don’t need any special immunization shots or microchips. Most pets need to be taken to the vet from time to time during their lifetime. And vets charge around $40 per visit. But worms never need a vet visit. And, if part of them gets cut off, sometimes they can even replace the severed part all by themselves. When you first bring a new pet to your home, sometimes they are not completely house-trained. They urinate (or worse) on your nice cream carpet. And they may bring very unpleasant smells to your home. Worms don’t have any of these kinds of problems. They are house-trained and if you give them the right mix of organic and paper wastes, …

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Pet Rabbits – A Worm’s Best Friend

Rabbit droppings are small, relatively dry and don’t contain too much nitrogen, which can spoil plant roots. Although new rabbit manure is considered great plant fertilizer, many rabbit growers choose to put earthworms under their rabbit cages. Why? Rabbit manure along with wasted rabbit feed has been proved to be some of the best food a worm can eat. Also, when properly cared for, earthworms eliminate manure piles, odor, and fly problems all together. For this reason alone, rabbits and worms make a great team. Rabbits are a worm’s best friend. Making Simple Compost with Earthworms To set up your earthworms for an optimal place to feed, you will want to have them underneath your rabbits cage. The best earthworm that I have found is redworms. Ideally, you should have 250-550 worms per square foot. Worms will do a terrific job eliminating the rabbit poop and wasted feed into dark, nutrient-rich, finely textured humus. In addition, keeping worms under the cages allows you to raise worms for fishing bait and worm castings for your garden. This ecosystem that you are creating with worms and rabbits creates a fantastic number of uses for catching fish and feeding gardens – all part of eating organically grown food. Creating a Rabbit and Earthworm Ecosystem Underneath the rabbit hutch you can build a wood frame around the worm bed.  This should be about 12 inches deep. The rabbit hutch should be 3 feet above the ground. A half inch wire mesh floor should be …

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10 Fruits Worms Love To Eat

As a new season of harvest rolls around, fresh peaches, pears, apples and much more will be filling kitchen pantries. It’s a great time of year to make delicious morning smoothies, fresh fruit pies and give your worms a succulent treat! This year, instead of letting all of your fruit trimmings go to waste, start a compost pile with them or give them to your worm farm! Worms are huge fans of fruit, it’s one of their favorite snacks. Any vermicomposter will tell you how much worms just seem to thrive and produce more when fruit is a staple in their diet. Since fruit doesn’t have a very long shelf life and it tends to go bad every now and then, chances are pretty good that you’ll have some spoiled fruit to share with them on a semi-regular basis. So what kind of fruits do worms like in particular? Top 10 Fruits Worms Love To Eat Worms will eat just about anything, but one of their most favorite dishes is organic fruit trimmings. Yes, that’s right – the stuff that usually ends up in your kitchen garbage disposal or in your trash. They’ll gladly take that off your hands, work on it and turn it into valuable compost! The big rule to bear in mind when feeding worms fruit is to avoid fruit with citric acid. Fruits you definitely want to avoid include oranges, lemons, limes, grapefruit and pineapple. Feeding these types of fruits can cause them to try to crawl …

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Where To Find Free Worm Food

Vermicomposting is the best way to get super high quality compost for your indoor plants and garden. It’s completely organic, the results are phenomenal and it saves you from having to buy compost from the store. But you have to feed the worms right? Doesn’t that cost money? You may be surprised to know that you can find a lot of food for your worms for free if you know where to look! Uncle Jim’s Worm Farm is here to help you make cost-effective decisions when it comes to organic gardening and we have some helpful tips on where you can go and what you can do to keep your worms healthy and happy. Where To Find Free Worm Food Depending on where you live, you shouldn’t have to wander far to stumble across loads of great fodder for your worm bin. If you play your cards just right, it’s possible to maintain a worm farm without spending a single dollar on food for your worms! Corrals & Grazing Areas For those living in rural areas, manure of herbivore species such as horses, cows or rabbits is one of the very best things you can feed your worms. There’s a big difference between manure of carnivore species and herbivore so stay away from dog, cat and human manure. Those types of manure will stink up your worm bins and likely cause you to gag every time you check in on your worms. You can find manure from plant-eating animals in …

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