How to Grow Worms as Fishing Bait

The cost and inconvenience of buying live bait is a nuisance when fishing with worms. If you only need live worms occasionally, stopping by the bait shop is no big deal. However, frequent worm fishing requires a significant amount of live bait. You save time and money by keeping your own supply of worms on hand. As a pleasant side-effect, the worms generate compost that makes your plants grow strong. Uncle Jim’s Worm Farm offers three varieties of fishing worms and advice on cultivating each one. Types of Fishing Worms The three types of fishing worms we offer are: Mealworms European Night Crawlers (Super Reds) Red Worms (Red Wigglers) Draw on your expertise to decide which type of worm

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How to Raise Worms for Live Bait for Fishing

Are you a fishing enthusiast who loves using live fishing worms as bait? Are you tired of the cost and inconvenience of buying live bait? You can easily keep a stock of juicy worms at your fingertips by composting with worms. Your kitchen scraps are going to waste! They would make great food for your fishing worms. As a bonus, you will get plenty of free fertilizer for your garden, lawn, and indoor plants. It’s inexpensive to start, and it takes just a few minutes per week. Vermicomposting, or composting with worms, is a fairly popular household activity. The worms are kept securely in a composting bin. You can make a basic worm bin from a tote in minutes. Uncle Jim’s Worm Farm offers three types of worms: Red Worms Meal Worms (Darkling Beetle larvae), and Super Reds (European Night Crawlers) Are Red Worms for Fishing? Red worms, or Red Wiggler Mix, are

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Uncle Jim’s Worm Farm Featured in Sports Section of the Washington Post

The Washington Post ran an article about the family that owns and operates Uncle Jim’s Worm Farm. Placed in the Sports section, Roman Stubbs’ article analyzed football player David Shaw, whose father Jim Shaw started selling worms 40 years ago. Jim grew up on a farm in Connecticut. He started raising fishing worms from the age of 8, at first for pocket money. Eventually, worm farming grew into a full-time business. Jim played football for Colgate, and moved to his own farm in Spring Grove, Pennsylvania. He bred Red Worms for composting, and European Night Crawlers for aeration. All of these made good fishing worms. He added mealworms for pet owners, bird

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Which Type of Worm Do I Need?

A worm is a worm is a worm. Or not! You may not have thought about it, but there are lots of types of worms out there. Here at Uncle Jim’s Worm Farm, we sell three main types of worms: Red Wigglers for composting; Super Reds for composting, releasing into the soil and fishing; and live Mealworms for animal feed. How do you choose which type of worm to buy? Well, it depends on what you want do with them. Choose Red Wigglers for Composting If you are composting, you should be thinking about buying Uncle Jim’s Red Wigglers. Red wigglers are Uncle Jim’s flagship worm–a small but mighty powerhouse when it comes to chewing through your compostable waste. Red wigglers are only about 1-3 inches long and the diameter of a pencil lead, but they can easily turn piles of vegetable scraps into excellent garden fertilizer. Red Wigglers don’t tend to dig deep–they are adapted to chewing up vegetable matter and animal manure in the top layer of soil. So being in a compost bin where their bedding and food scraps are only a few inches deep doesn’t offend them. They are also right at home processing bedding and manure from herbivores, such as rabbits. If you are composting indoors, Red Wigglers are highly recommended. If your compost bin or pile is outdoors, Red Wigglers are also superior; however, you may need to make a little extra effort to keep them healthy in extreme temperatures. This is because they …

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Fishing Worms and Rabbits: A Match Made in Heaven?

If you want to integrate worm farming with your rabbit operation, have a look at the classic, Raising Fishworms with Rabbits, by Howard “Lucky” Mays. First published in 1976, this little manual is two parts valuable instruction and one part personal anecdotes. Mays tells the story of how he got started with rabbits and worms and gives lots of valuable tips on everything from finding rabbit stock to recognizing problems in your worm bin. Mays started out with $5 borrowed from the grocery money, and in the end he has a barn with several hundred rabbits. You might think that many rabbits would stink, but thanks to the composting worms, his barn is odorless, even when closed up for the winter. Worms as a Waste Disposal Solution Gardeners think of rabbit manure as a “cool” manure, and some use it directly on their plants. But manure is not the only waste product your rabbits are generating. There’s also their used nesting material, their urine, and their spilled feed — not to mention the flies that will eventually find their way to this mess. Taken together, you’ve got a hot and stinky waste disposal problem! Proper composting turns that problem into an opportunity. The nitrogen from the urine and the feed combines with the carbon from the bedding and other organic matter, and over time a lovely fertilizer results. This fertilizer can be sold or used on your own plants. Mays takes it one step further and adds worms to the …

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Natural Baits For Trout Fishing

If you’ve ever caught a trout, you know why they are so highly sought after. They put up a great fight, they’re beautiful in all of their varieties and they’re great-tasting! Trout can be caught in all kinds of different ways ranging from fly-fishing and lures to bait fishing. What’s the best method to fish for trout? It depends. Sometimes flies are the way to go. Other times, when the weather turns and insects aren’t in season, it’s helpful to have a selection of natural baits on hand to catch the big one. In general, the more natural your fly/lure/bait appears, the more fish you’re likely to catch! Fishing purists tend to gravitate exclusively toward fly-fishing because of the challenge of properly presenting a fly, the thrill of catching fish with custom hand-tied flies and the virtue of catch and release without causing injury to the fish. Additionally, there are many streams and lakes throughout the U.S. that are off-limits for bait fishing. Whatever method you choose, be sure to check with your local fishing regulations to know whether or not bait fishing is allowed. Fishing For Trout With Natural Baits Worms, bait fish, crickets, hellgrammites, nymphs and a whole lot more have been used for ages with a great deal of success. Some of these natural baits can be found near the tributary you are fishing. A good strategy to catch more trout is to examine their environment to find out what they feed on naturally. Do crickets thrive …

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Best Way To Hook A Worm

As the weather begins to warm, people are getting their fishing poles ready for more comfortable fishing outings. And if there’s one way to enjoy fishing comfortably, it’s with the the classic worm and bobber. Fishing with a worm and bobber gives you options. You can fish while you… sprawl out and be hands free listen to your favorite music soak up the sun while drinking your favorite beverage step away for some game time bird watch make phone calls check Facebook make plans for your garden hunt for worms …but you won’t get very far if you don’t know how to properly hook a worm. Have you ever cast your line out into the water after baiting your hook and your line goes one way and your bait goes another? Bait fishing does require a little bit of technique if you want good results and make the most of your time. How To Properly Bait A Hook Using A Worm There are several schools of thought when it comes down to it, but in general, here are the guidelines most fishermen use while bait fishing. Following these tips will help you catch more fish, making your comfortable fishing outings that much more enjoyable. Keep your worms cool. Leaving your worms out in the heat will turn your worms to mush. They’re only good if you keep them cool. The cooler they are, the less they’ll wiggle while baiting your hook. Get your hands dirty. This accomplishes a couple things. …

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Using Red “Wigglers” Worms For Ice Fishing

There aren’t too many outdoor activities that you can do (and do well) year round. Fishing is one of them that allows you such a great convenience. You can enjoy reeling in fish during the warm Spring and Summer  and continue to do so throughout the colder Winter months. Not bad eh? No matter what time of year it is, fishing with worms is always a possibility. And it’s great fun! If you are an organic grower who has built up a more than ample supply of red worms and feel like you could stand to get rid of some, then why not take them out and try your luck at fishing this winter? After all, fish love worms don’t they? The Winter is definitely no exception! Fish Love Worms Since fish live in water and worms dwell in the earth, some people wonder why fish like to eat worms in the first place. Truth is, worms aren’t confined to soil. In fact, many worms are considered aquatic animals rather than terrestrial animals. While worms are not the main source of food for fish, a wide variety of fish species encounter worms semi-often along river banks, lake bottoms and in streams. You can bet that most fish won’t pass up a chance to feed on a well-presented red worm. Red Worms Are Irresistible Red worms are just the right size. Not too big, not too small. They’re neither intimidating or unmanageable. They’re a perfect bite size portion most any fish would be …

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Best Worms For Bait Fishing

Fishing is all about the details, especially if you have any hopes of landing the big ones. Freshwater worms are probably the most common bait used for fresh water species. Selecting the right worm for bait fishing is a very important component to your success. Fishing is fun, but catching is a lot more fun, which is why you need to be meticulous in your bait preparation. While there is no single worm that takes the cake for all fishing applications, there are a few that serve as staples in the bass, catfish, pan fish and trout fishing communities. Here is a breakdown of what worms are good for what kind of fish and how to use them for best results. Common Night Crawlers These are definitely a staple worm in the fishing community. If you secure a night crawler to a hook with excess worm dangling off the hook, you are certain to draw all sorts of attention to your bait. These things are big, appealing and they wiggle like crazy. Bass fishermen know that largemouth and smallmouth bass will rarely pass up a chance to pounce on a wiggling nightcrawler. Earthworms or night crawlers are also a favorite meal for Walleye. Catfish who roam around the water’s bottom looking for an easy meal are sure to chomp at your night crawler before long. Night crawlers also work well for trout, although many fishermen cut the night crawlers in half to make the meal a little more manageable for …

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How to Order Worms from Uncle Jim’s Worm Farm

James Shaw, founder and owner of Uncle Jims Worm Farm, has been in the industry of worm farming for about four decades now. Uncle Jim’s specializes in breeding and raising Red Wiggler worms (also known as composting worms). But is also in the business of selling other worm species and supplies. A company that is USDA approved (also federally inspected), this reputable vermiculture farm was also featured in the Oprah Winfrey show. Ordering is easy at Uncle Jim’s Worm Farm! Uncle Jim’s worms are guaranteed to be the lowest-priced composting worms being sold on the Internet to date. Other than its affordability, the brand also keeps its old and new customers accustomed to their easy-to-use ordering system. When you order 5000 worms for example, a shopping cart can be accessed below the webpage. From here, you will find a few buttons that will provide you a few more options such as clicking your ‘preferred quantity’. And when you’re done, you can click the Add To Cart button. You will then be redirected to a page that will ask you to choose on ‘Continue Shopping’ or to ‘Proceed to Checkout’. Should you choose the latter, a Checkout form will appear right after. Fill-up the form and then pay your balance. What to expect from Uncle Jim’s packaging When you order from the worm farm, expect your earthworms to get to you in an 8-inch cube corrugated cardboard box. Uncle Jim’s earthworms are always carefully packed inside a breathable cotton bag. Now, …

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