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Best Way To Hook A Worm

worm-on-hookAs the weather begins to warm, people are getting their fishing poles ready for more comfortable fishing outings. And if there’s one way to enjoy fishing comfortably, it’s with the the classic worm and bobber.

Fishing with a worm and bobber gives you options. You can fish while you…
  • sprawl out and be hands free
  • listen to your favorite music
  • soak up the sun while drinking your favorite beverage
  • step away for some game time
  • bird watch
  • make phone calls
  • check Facebook
  • make plans for your garden
  • hunt for worms
…but you won’t get very far if you don’t know how to properly hook a worm.
Have you ever cast your line out into the water after baiting your hook and your line goes one way and your bait goes another? Bait fishing does require a little bit of technique if you want good results and make the most of your time.

How To Properly Bait A Hook Using A Worm

There are several schools of thought when it comes down to it, but in general, here are the guidelines most fishermen use while bait fishing. Following these tips will help you catch more fish, making your comfortable fishing outings that much more enjoyable.
  1. Keep your worms cool. Leaving your worms out in the heat will turn your worms to mush. They’re only good if you keep them cool. The cooler they are, the less they’ll wiggle while baiting your hook.
  2. Get your hands dirty. This accomplishes a couple things. First, it keeps your human scent off the worm. Fish have very good noses and may not hit your worm if they smell something fishy, or humany, going on. Second, a little dirt on your fingers will help you control the worm as you spear it and push it up the hook.
  3. Cut the worm. Worms can sometimes wiggle violently in the water and depending on what kind of fish you are going after, you might present a meal that is somewhat intimidating. Trout especially like manageable portions, so consider cutting your worm in half if using an earthworm. Better than the earthworm, use common redworms for trout. They love ’em!
  4. Spear one of the worm on to the hook and slide it up the hook until it reaches your line. Think of how you put your sock on in the morning. Do it in a similar fashion, except leave a portion of the worm dangling to preserve its worm-like presence in the water.
  5. If using small worms such as manure worms, hook several of these little worms to hide the hook.
  6. Every 15 minutes or so, reel in your line to make sure your worm is still attached. You don’t want to waste time with nothing on your hook. Generally, the better your hook your worm, the less of a problem this will be, so take your time. You’re fishing, after all, time is on your side!
There you have it. If you have a special way of hooking a worm, be sure to let us know in the comments below!
Uncle Jim’s Worm Farm is a vermicomposting company specializing in red wigglers, the world’s best composters! Check out our worm selection today! The above image is not our own.

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