Ready to Be a Worm Farmer? Two Worm Kits to Start you Off!

We’re happy to report the trend towards bulk and commercial composting continues to grow, which means that demand for composting equipment and products, like the red wiggler worms, are going to continue to expand. As the composting practice increases around the country, there is a good chance they there will be an increased need for red wiggler worms in your neck of the woods before too long. Get started on your worm farming now with any of these three pre-packaged worm kits.   Worm Farm Kit Looking for something bigger than a hobby?  Well then create your own worm farm!  The farm kit comes loaded with double the worms, double the bedding, and double the feed!  Well-beyond the capacity of the young, school-child.   This kit is intended for the aspiring tycoon, the striving mogul, and the motivated entrepreneur; plenty of worms to raise, plenty of learning to achieve, and plenty of space in the container for the worms to breed!  For those fearless individuals looking for more than a science project, round-up a farm kit and let your ambitions run wild!         Worm Ranch Kit The biggest bloat we have, our Ranch kit.  This doesn’t come in some dinky 6 inch tall container, but instead, an 11 inch deep, thunder tub!  Serious wormers only, because this tub is no joke; bloated with bedding and feed for 2,000 red wrigglers, enough room for maximum breeding, and plenty of space to stuff your table scraps to make a miniature …

Read More

The Top Four Ecological Benefits of Composting Explained

With all the talk about composting and the posts telling you simply have to do it, here are four simple reasons that all that chatter has some real reasoning behind it. Rejuvenate Leached Soil Areas If you’ve ever tried to plant shrubs, veggies or flowers in an area of your yard and they simply always die, no matter the variety, there’s a good chance you’ve reached a portion of soil that has been leached of the nutrients normally found in soil. In lieu of leaving a section of your yard barren of green and color, apply some compost to the area and water in to kick-start the nutrient production for the area. The composting process enhances the production of bacteria and fungi that break down local organic material to make humus. It is this humus that drives up the nutrient level of the soil and helps it to retain moisture in case of drought. Reverse Soil Contamination Suppose you are rebuilding a home that has a fire. While it may take a while to return the soil to its original state, compost can help make the area livable faster by absorbing odors and treating the VOC’s, volatile organic compounds, that may have seeped into the ground during the blaze. Compost can also prevent these compounds from traveling to local plant life or water resources if it is applied quickly enough to the area. Prevent Pollution Not only does compost reduce the waste production of any region that employs the practice for …

Read More

Teach the Children Well: Composting Education for Future Generations

While composting is definitely picking up steam as a household practice, it’s far from being the norm than the anomaly. That being said, to keep the momentum building, we need to turn to our next generation’s attention to compost as a part of their daily lives. The DailyIowan recently reported such a plan, by Scott Koepke, a native Iowan who handles a part-time schedule teaching students about the practice, joy and gooshy-wiggly goodness of composting. Read entire article here. It’s not hard to imagine getting most school-age kids interested in digging in dirt and playing with worms. Add to it playing with food, and you’ve just about elevated the action to kids idea of Nirvana. To teach your toddlers or school kids about composting, get a sturdy bin, layer it halfway with compost materials and worms, then go through the process from table to compost bin that you would normally follow. Let the kids scrape the plates into the compost caddy, dump it into two piles of greens or browns and layer it into the bin for the red wiggler worms to munch. While they’re following the motions, tell them the purpose of each step, how the worms make the compost, what the result will be and why it’s good for the planet. Kids live hand on learning, and composting is no exception to that rule. The lesson will stick with them a lot longer than just reiterating “We should compost to save the planet”. If we take the same …

Read More

It’s Monday Morning, Do you know where your Red Wigglers Are?

Well, a good answer would be “in my compost bin”, but it’s important to remember that although they’re pretty self-sufficient muscle-bound worms, they do need a little attention from their landlord (meaning you) on occasion since they can’t effectively send you a note saying “too hot in here” or “we’re a little thirsty”. There are four things you need to monitor to ensure the health and wellness of your red wiggler worms: pH levels temperature moisture content fresh air The proper pH level for a worm bin is pH is around 7.0, however, red wiggler worms can handle levels from 4.2 to 8.0 or higher. Use limestone to balance your worm compost bin’s pH levels, but be sure to use limestone only, not hydrated lime because that can kill your worms. Compost bin temperature should stay between 55 – 77 degrees Fahrenheit. Temps above 84 degrees can be harmful to your worms and temperatures below 50 degrees can slow your worms activity to a, well, crawl. While you don’t want a puddle in your worm compost bin, red wiggler worms need their sin to remain moist for survival so keep the bedding materials moist like soil would be. Keep your worm compost bin aerated so your worms have the fresh air they need to breathe. Your worms will work their best if the above conditions are met and will live long enough to spawn several generations of new worms, to keep your worm-investment costs down. They’ll work for you if …

Read More

Worms in the Morning, Worms in the Evening, Check your Worms at Suppertime

As anyone who tends a vegetable patch or fruit field on their property knows that they take constant maintenance, at all times of day. Cutting and watering should be done in the morning or early evening, weeding can be done anytime and pest repellents should be applied at night to ward off nocturnal critters as well as those that munch by day. That being said, your compost bin and the red wiggler worms inside your bin need your attention, although not quite as often. Red wigglers are a variety of earthworm that is used most often for composting. They need a specific pH to thrive in their worm bin home as well as the right moisture levels, the right food and the right temperature to allow them to create the nutrient-rich compost you can then use to feed your veggies, fruits, plants, shrubs and trees. Add compost materials to your compost bin in the evening so your nocturnal worms can feed at their leisure. Red wiggler worms are also sensitive to light and direct sun, so try to open your bin only on foggy or hazy days, or at dusk. The same goes for checking the moisture and pH levels of your bin – do not open your compost bin between the hours of 10AM and 2PM, to keep the hottest/ most direct sun off your worms. If you’re an early riser, you can always manage your compost bin maintenance in the wee morning hours before 9, your worms may …

Read More

Earth Day is April 22 – Use the Day to Begin Composting!

Earth Day 2011 is April 22, and that means that our focus needs to turn to the steps we can each take as individuals to help improve the ecology around us. Composting is an obvious answer sine it allows us to reduce our garbage production by utilizing a bulk of our yard and food scraps as a basis to create nutrient-rich compost in our compost bins that can then take the place of chemical-based grass and plant fertilizers. Reducing garbage production slows the growth of our local dumps and trash heaps as well as reduces the harmful ozone-deteriorating gases produced by rotting food scraps. Replacing chemical-based fertilizers with compost in our yards and gardens reduces the harmful chemical runoff that often ends up in our local streams, lakes and waterways. They kill local wildlife and cause extensive damage to our natural water sources. Composting is not a complicated process – it takes a lot less time and effort than many people think, and the good that it can do both for the environment and your yard and garden are incredible. Even if you live in an apartment, you can have a compost bin or even compost with worms to do some good in your neighborhood.

Read More

Welcome Summer by Revitalizing Your Worms!

Can you feel the warm sun on your face? Are you watching the big, fluffy white clouds track lazily across a deep blue sky? Spring is here and that means the red wiggler worms living in your compost bin may need a little TLC to revitalize them. Clean Up the Mess To make your compost bin a little more livable for your wiggly pals, try to remove any stray sticks or rocks that may have ended up in the bin. These barricades make it difficult for your wigglers to effectively do their job of aerating the compost and can slow down the process. Keep it Humid, but Not Too Humid Good humidity levels in your compost are crucial to keep your worms happy and munching away. The summer can bring dry heat that can make the top layer of your pile dry out and increase the temperatures of the bin beyond the composting temperature of 120 to 150 degrees F. To battle the dry-out and prevent a possible burn-out, move the bin to a shaded area in your yard during the hotter months. If necessary, trickle the hose over the contents to add a bit more hydration. Also, turn the materials a little more frequently to maintain proper moisture levels all through the bin. Bring Friends to the Party As living organisms, there is always a certainty that one day you’ll head to you bin and find a few of your wriggly little buddies has move on to that great …

Read More

3 of the Most Common Misconceptions about Composting

There has been a solid wave towards adoption of composting as a practice both on the commercial and residential end in the last few years, but there are still some of you that may be wary of starting your own compost bin. Yes, my composting friends, some of your neighbors, some of your friends, even some of your family members may avoid taking the composting plunge due to the following misconceptions. Read on and then take it upon yourself to educate them: The smell. The number one fear of the compost-challenged, this issue is usually the first derailer of any potential composter and is not even a reality. No well maintained compost bin that is monitored regularly for pH and moisture levels will have any smell. Period. I won’t have a use for it. Compost is not dirt, it is organic feed for your garden and yard. You can use it for your grass, your trees, your flower beds and your shrubs. Have a little left over – give it to your neighbor. No time to manage it. Composting takes only a few minutes every couple of days to manage. Turning your compost, checking the pH levels and adding organic materials to your bin can all be done in a short time. While the setup may be a little intensive, once it’s ready, time involvement is very manageable. Better yet, composting with red wiggler worms takes even more stress off you in that they really do all the work, munching through …

Read More

Rhode Island Turns to Compost Options

Gathering at the Rhode Island School of Design, about 200 community eco-minded community members heard argument s for a Compost Initiative in the state. According to the Providence Journal ”The goal of the Compost Initiative, sponsored by the Environment Council of Rhode Island Education Fund and the Southside Community Land Trust, is to remove all food scraps from the Rhode Island waste stream. Doing that could create green jobs, extend the life of the Central Landfill, produce electricity to sell and help residents grow their own food or buy locally grown food, said Greg Gerritt, conference organizer. Gerritt said it’s a big job, requiring the cooperation of everyone who touches food. Waste haulers and commercial food handlers would have to find each other, entrepreneurs would be needed to devise products and systems, and facilities would have to be built for composting on a large scale, such as anaerobic digesters that also produce electricity for sale. Reese Howle of Orbit Energy said his company is planning to build an anaerobic digesting plant in Rhode Island that will process 150 tons of food waste a day. Orbit Energy is negotiating to sell to National Grid the electricity generated by the biogas the plant will produce. He said his company, which operates a digester in North Carolina, is pursuing contracts with Rhode Island food handlers that could supply food waste.” As the compost movement continues to sweep the nation, the question composting at home becomes moot. It is absolutely vital the community members …

Read More

House and Lifestyle Maintenance for your Red Wiggler Worms: Compost 101

You’ve started composting with red wiggler worms, which, by the way, are the very best little natural farmers on the planet. They eat the residual organic materials and from it make the loamy, nutrient-enriched compost that can be used in yards, gardens and lawns to replenish and rebuild their natural strengths and beauty. Residing in a worm farm, your red wiggler worms need the normal TLC anyone living on your property would need. They need a place to live, they need that home maintained and they need food to eat to survive. Worm bins come in a slew of sizes and types, both for indoor and outdoor use. Depending on the size of your yard, house or apartment, you can choose the size and type of compost bin you want for your needs. The amount of food waste your household produces is a good indicator of how many worms and the size compost bin you’ll need.

Read More