Composting with Worms in Cold Weather

When the weather is cold, your worm outdoor composting program might need some adjustments. Worm are living creatures that can be harmed by low temperatures. You can choose not to worry about it, or you can take steps to protect the worms. Either way, your composting program can continue throughout the winter. If you let nature take its course, your worms might expire. The center bottom of your worm bin will probably be the warmest part. They will likely migrate there. The decomposition process generates some heat. However, if you live anywhere in the northern United States, chances are the worms won’t make it. It is possible your worms will have laid eggs. These hardy eggs can survive the cold temperatures. If you don’t see many worms in

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How to Make a Chicken Wire Composter in 10 Minutes

If you are new to composting with worms, you will need a composter to house the bedding, worms and food scraps. The worms will usually stay put if you provide a secure abode for them to live in. They love dark, moist bedding and regular feedings of food scraps. After the worms have eaten scraps for a few months, you will be able to harvest the finished compost and use it on your garden, lawn, and indoor plants. Uncle Jim made this video about building a simple composter in just 10 minutes. It uses chicken wire, poles, and a bag of Red Worms from Uncle Jim’s Worm Farm. Watch it here:

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Worm Blankets and Lids: Best Coverings for Your Worm Bin

Composting with worms usually involves covering the bin to control moisture. Worms respond to their environment. If their world is too wet or too dry, they will be less productive and possibly even die. Composting with worms is a great way to turn kitchen and gardening scraps to into valuable fertilizer. One key to success is finding the best covering for your worm bin. Worm bins can be indoors or outdoors. Indoor composting systems are typically small, tray-based plastic composters, such as the Worm Factory 360 (which can also go outside). The Worm Farm Kit and bins made from plastic totes can be used indoors or outdoors. Outdoors composters can be tray-based, or large bins. These can be made from plastic, wooden pallets, lumber, or chicken wire. Coverings for Indoor Composters Indoor composters are not subject to the same temperature and

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Help Your Composting Worms Keep Their Cool in the Hot Summer

In the summertime, things start heating up in your outdoor worm composting bin. Unfortunately, if the bin temperature gets too high, the composting worms will overheat, dry out and die. There are many things you can do to keep your worm population cool enough to survive. Placing the worm bin in the right location is the most important way to control the internal temperature. Exposure to the sun heats the bin up more quickly than you might think. So keeping your bin out of the sun will keep the temperature down. Pick a spot that is shady for the entire day. Try placing it under an awning or shed roof, under a shady tree or next to tall bushes. Just don’t place it right up against the house, or local vermin might get the wrong idea and start muscling in on your home. Depending on the type of bin, you may need to provide

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How to Make a Screen to Separate Worms from Compost

If you have been composting with worms, you will occasionally want to harvest those valuable worm castings. This completed compost is rich in nutrients and perfect for the garden. Completed compost helps plants grow strong. One way easy to separate the worms from the compost is to use a screen. Here at Uncle Jim’s Worm Farm, we use more sophisticated machines to separate hundreds of thousands of worms a week. For

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Community Garden Composting: Why and How

Community gardening projects are popping up all over. Setting up a garden helps bring the neighborhood together, makes use of wasted space, improves air quality, provides food for insects and birds, and produces fresh food. If you are involved in setting up a community garden, you need to include a system for composting leftover vegetation. Uncle Jim’s Worm Farm offers these ideas and instructions for establishing functional and safe composting systems. Why Your Community Garden Needs a Composting System If this is the first time you are gardening on this scale,

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The Differences Between Biogas and Composting for Managing Organic Waste

Both biogas and composting turn wasted organic material into something useful. Biogas makes methane, which is collected and burned to generate electricity. Composting makes organic fertilizer, which is used by gardeners, golf course managers and farmers to grow plants. Let’s dig into depth about their similarities and differences. Scale: All Sizes Both systems can work on any scale. Biogas is usually done on a large scale by a municipality or energy company. Some adventurous households tackle it themselves with DIY biogas generators. Composting can be done on a small scale in a household, for an entire apartment building or campus, or on a massive municipal basis. Inputs: Similar Both processes need organic matter, such as kitchen scraps, left-over vegetables

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Should I Buy Compost or Make My Own Compost?

Here at Uncle Jim’s Worm Farm, we sell an awful lot of finished compost to people who want to fertilize their plants, gardens and lawns naturally. We also sell huge quantities of composting worms for making compost. Sometimes, folks ask us, “Should I buy worms to make my own compost, or order finished compost?” The answer to this question depends on several factors.

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Start Composting on Earth Day April 22

The best day of the year to start a composting program in your home, school or workplace is April 22. This is Earth Day, when we all show our support for environmental protection. Collecting organic trash and composting it helps the environment in many ways. And it’s easy to do! When you toss an apple core into the trash, it gets mixed in with all the other trash. In a few days, you have a stinky mess in a sealed plastic bag for the trash collector to pick up. The trash is either incinerated or put into a landfill. Burning mixed trash creates toxic gasses, and the resulting ash is handled as toxic waste. Landfills produce methane, a greenhouse gas. And landfills eventually come back to haunt us. If you put that same apple core into a composting

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