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Lawn Care: How often can you spray your lawn with worm tea?

Worm tea like most fertilizers, is a product that can be directly applied on your lawn without having to worry about burning it (unlike the usage of chemical fertilizers). It’s an organic solution that can instantly be absorbed by the grass, and is something that’s made readily available for the sod’s consumption. Now worm compost tea is actually worm castings that have been previously oxygenated and submerged in chlorine-free water. You can learn more about the right use and application for worm compost tea by reading further of this article.

Worm Tea Supplies

Vermicomposting tea can be done by gathering the following supplies: your supply of worm castings, an old sock (should be hole-less so that the compost doesn’t seep out), some dechlorinated water (you can also use tap water that’s been left to settle for about 24 hours), some molasses or corn syrup, a 5-gallon bucket, and a bubbler.

How to create worm tea

The water that you’ll be using for the tea should be chlorine-free. It’s best to keep it that way so that you don’t destroy the live microbes that will be present in the system. Now, have your old sock filled with some castings. Have the sock tied securely before submerging it in the water. As soon as the sock is soaked, add in some molasses or corn syrup (either organic substances will be used as food for the live organisms contained in the tea). The last step is to set-up the bubbler (aerating the tea in this manner will actually help produce more live microbes). Leave the tea to brew for about 24 hours before using it on your lawn.

Immediate use of the Worm Tea

The making of worm compost tea is more of an aerobic process, as the aerobic microbes that are present in the tea are actually dependent on oxygen to help them thrive and multiply. In this manner, vermiculture tea should be immediately used after brewing, and while it’s heavily packed with beneficial microbes (bubbling the tea keeps dormant microbes come to life). Now should the tea start to smell bad, then you know that your worm compost tea has finally reached its anaerobic stage. So make sure to consume the tea while its teeming with life.

The benefits of spraying worm tea on your lawn

Worm castings tea works well as an organic fertilizer (can be diluted with more chlorine-free water or sprayed in full-strength). It’s liquid form helps plant life such as your lawn to quickly absorb the nutrients contained in the brew (the tea itself is packed with a lot of nutrients). The use of worm tea can also help keep the root systems of your grass protected from  potential root and plant diseases. Apart from that, you can give your lawn a boost by just spraying worm compost tea twice a week. You will also be able to see great results on your lawn just by spraying on your sod during the late afternoon (as the microbes are kept protected from the harsh rays of the sun). But for best results, you can apply worm castings tea when your grass turns green (usually during the spring season).

Uncle Jim’s recommends the 1000 Red Wigglers

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2 comments on “Lawn Care: How often can you spray your lawn with worm tea?

  • You know, I’ve never tried this method before so I think it would be a good idea to try it out. One of the better things that I like about this is that it’s organic. I’m sure that if I do decide to do this, that it will work out well for me.

    Reply

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