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How to Vermicompost with Nightcrawler worms

A lot of worm enthusiasts might ask how to vermicompost with nightcrawler worms? Well, there are actually two common types of nightcrawler worms, the European nightcrawlers and the African nightcrawlers. To know more about these two, let’s read on further below. What is Vermicomposting? Well, vermicomposting is actually a natural form of recycling organic wastes. You simply use worms to make this process run its course. These worms then turn these organic scraps into a rich black soil material, which you can later on use to supplement your plants and soil (amongst other benefits). The European Nightcrawler As previously mentioned, there are types of nightcrawler worms, and the

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Types of Nightcrawler Worms

There are many types of nightcrawler worms (also referred to as grunt worms, garden worms, and leaf worms). There’s the European kind, as well as the African and Canadian nightcrawlers. They are the perfect worms for live fish bait; and are a good food source for different kinds of reptiles, amphibians, and birds. But which nightcrawlers are more preferred when it comes to live fish bait, and for vermicomposting? Let’s find out more below. Nightcrawlers and its kinds Raising nightcrawlers is simple. You’ll just have to provide them a worm bin with some earthy soil (and of course some organic food supply), that you can store indoors (in your basement or garage) or outdoors afterwards (on your lawn or garden). Also take note that nightcrawlers have no eyes or ears. They only sense the motion of things through vibrations. They typically burrow down the soil (can burrow as deeps as 6 ½ feet) as soon as they feel minor shudders in their surroundings. But their burrowing has its advantages too since it helps with the aerating of the soil. They’re also sensitive to light that’s why they burrow back under the soil when it’s daylight. Aside from that, they’re usually seen feeding at night, and after a good rain (usually when there’s dew on the grass). They’re also thicker and larger in size (grows as long as 14 inches!) compared to red worms. And as previously mentioned, there are three known kinds of nightcrawlers; and these are the European nightcrawlers …

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Tips on Storing Worm Tea

There are a lot of things that you can do with worm castings; and one of them would be to make tea out of worm poop from red wrigglers, and nightcrawlers. To find out more, you should read a few facts in this article about tips on storing worm tea, and more. Worm compost tea is basically made through a brewing process. It’s created by immersing the castings of worms into the water (the castings are usually enclosed in a cloth bag, and is tied so nothing seeps out from the bag as soon as it is submerged in the water). The nutrients and the other good bacteria that’s contained in the castings are then released into the water. It’s when the water is aerated that the microorganisms grow and multiply in number (an oxygen-rich environment is produced). This worm tea dilution then becomes your liquid organic fertilizer. So, how do you exactly make worm compost tea? Well, you’re going to have to prepare a bucket that can hold a gallon, and then some dechlorinated water.

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How to make Worm Tea out of worm castings

After worm composting, what then becomes of its deposits? Now this is where the organic fertilizers come into the picture. Worm by-product can simply be used in three ways: as an organic fertilizer (still in its earthy soil state) for your plants, as a soil conditioner, and as a liquid fertilizer. The liquid fertilizer that has leached out from you worm bin is what we call worm tea. There are simple how to steps in producing your very own tea from worms. So, how do you make worm tea exactly? How to create tea from worm manure Worm manure in liquid form can be a great organic soil amendment, and is definitely odorless. You can create tea from worm poop by simply preparing the needed materials for this: a worm bin, a small rake (the hand-held type), a muslin bag, a large bucket, some water, and a squirt bottle. You can start with this simple brewing process by following these easy steps: From the bottom part of your worm bin, you will see some castings on top of it. Rake these off from the bin, which you will then place directly into the muslin bag. As soon as you’ve filled the bag with worm castings, tie it right away so that you can secure the contents of it (especially when you completely submerge it into the water). You’re going to have to submerge the muslin bag (containing the castings from red wigglers or nightcrawlers, whichever worm source it was from) …

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Tips on Harvesting Worm Castings

For some worm composters, harvesting worm castings can be a very tasking thing to do. You’re going to have to try your hand at separating the castings from the worms, at a thorough manner. But then again, a lot of worm bins make harvesting easier to do, but there are also some that aren’t as conducive. You’ll know that your worm bin has been filled-up with castings as soon as you see rich, earthy soil stuff in it. It’s also easier to harvest these worm castings if you have those stackable units at home. You’ll only have to take out the bottom tray, and empty it afterwards (you can store the castings inside another container). But if you want to try other common approaches to harvesting worm poop, then you can try the following tips: Tip 1: Since red wiggler worms are sensitive to light, you can separate them from their castings by simply shunning some light on them (you can probably use a lamp or flashlight for this); and they will instantly burrow back into the bottom part of the soil. So, as soon as the worms disappear, you can then scan through some worm manure that has been casted aside. Scoop from the top pile all the way to the bottom, using either a shovel or your hands. And if you happen to scoop in some worms, you can just put them back right in their bin. Plus, you won’t have to worry about the smell or the …

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What to feed Red Wigglers

When you’re breeding earthworms, it’s not enough that you provide them a nice and comfortable bin to thrive in. You should also be able to provide the right food supply to them. So, what to feed red wigglers then, you might ask? Read on further below to know more. What to feed Red Wiggler worms When you’re raising red worms, it’s best that you feed them only what is good for their diet. There are certain organic wastes that they can eat, and also can’t eat. So, you really have to be very knowledgeable about what to feed them with. So feeding them, comes with a little bit of care and maintenance as well. Feeding red wigglers is actually simple. You’ll just have to feed them decomposing organic wastes, that have been cut or chopped into smaller pieces already; and are then buried under the ground (to sway away from unwanted visits from pests and to also avoid odor build-ups). Moving forward, the best thing that you can feed your red wigglers is animal manure. Only feed them something that has been days old already; and have been produced by vegetable eating animals, like rabbits for example (manure from pets are not as healthy especially for worm consumption). Aside from animal manure, you can also feed them the following organic wastes: Crushed Egg Shells – adds that much needed grit for the worm’s digestion. It also provides calcium, helps in the worms reproduction, and also helps in increasing the pH …

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Types of Composting Bins

There are many types of composting bins; and it all has different uses for it. But other than that, the perfect interior setting for a composter should be something that can house both moist surroundings and a warm temperature. In this way, the contents in the bin will be able to decompose right away; and then produce finished composted after some time. Compost Bin Materials There are a variety of raw materials used for making compost bins. And some of these are created in materials that are either plastic, stainless-steel, mesh wires, wood, block, brick or stones. Kitchen scraps and garden wastes on the other hand, can be composted using compost bins that vary in all shapes and sizes. You can readily purchase a bin that’s already made, or choose to make one on your own. Compost Bin Types There are composting bins that are used as holding units, or as tumbling composters. Tumblers such as a homemade compost tumbler, or tumblers in general, are said to produce finished compost faster than bins (given that the compost contents are well maintained on a regular basis). But in any case, both tools have proven themselves well when it comes to recycling decomposing organic materials. Now to get on to more interesting things, let’s discuss briefly the different kinds of composting bins. Bin Type 1: Plastic Stationary– You can use this to do some regular composting. It also has air vents or holes on selected parts of the bin (typically seen on …

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Building a Compost Bin of your own

If composting interests you, then it’s a good idea to invest on Building a Compost Bin of your own. You can even keep one (or more) for your home composting needs. But aside from that, compost bins can come in variations. And since there are also different kinds of composting, you should take note of the kind of bin that you’re going to use; as there are units that you can look into when it comes to a specific project. There are also different kinds of units for your compost. But they’re all the same when it comes to keeping all the bin’s contents (contains kitchen scraps, garden wastes, and worms for some) until the compost is finally ready for harvest. There are also indoor composters and outdoor composters that you can choose to use. You’ll just have to know what to use it specifically for. Compost bins are easier to build and won’t usually require on too much work. Bins such as this are usually smaller compared to a large homemade compost tumbler. Also, a compost bin is typically good for use if you only have a few organic materials to compost. Anyway, let’s go right ahead into making your own compost bin. Take note that there are a few things in your home that you can probably improvise, and turn into a homemade composter. But one option that you can consider is to use a plastic pail (it should at least be 2 feet high, or more). Your …

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Basic Facts and Advantages of Composting

There are many facts and advantages of composting that can be made very useful. But other than that, you should know that there are also different kinds of composting. There’s anaerobic, aerobic, and vermicomposting. You can use any of these processes when composting. You can even put into practice some home composting if you want; and all you’ll need is some organic wastes, composting bins, or just a compost pile, neatly placed in your garden or lawn. Composting makes good use of organic scraps that are usually just thrown into the trash bins. You should know that organic materials that are in the form of kitchen scraps and garden wastes can still be converted into other useful produce. It not only also helps minimize landfill accumulation, it also provides a home for earthworms (helps in aerating and loosening the soil) and other beneficial organisms. Other than that, making compost is easy and inexpensive. You’ll only need resources for compost that you can easily find at home (as previously mentioned, kitchen and garden wastes). Also, you’ll need air and moisture (for both aerobic and worm composting) to be present in the composting bin or compost heap, as well as some red worms for composting. But if you want to put in days old animal manure, then you can find these from local farms for free; much like the coffee grounds that are also being given by local shops, for no extra charge. By-products that have been created from your compost, can …

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Types of Composting

Composting has always been a good method of recycling. It not only helps breakdown decomposing organic materials (like food scraps from the kitchen, days old animal manure, grass clippings, dried leaves, and more), it also helps enhance the life of the ecosystem by making good use of its by-products. There are also three main types of composting. You’ll just have to pick which one will work better for your garden or lawn. But whether you choose one from the other, it’ll still be a good choice, as composting is eco-friendly and very cost-effective. The first kind of composting is aerobic composting. In this process, air is used to compost organic materials. You can use organic scraps that are high in nitrogen, which are usually your ‘greens’. Anyway, bacteria that is produced from wastes that have a high nitrogen content, will be the ones to generate high temperatures; and these temperatures can go as high as 160 degrees. Take note that this composting method requires much needed attention. You’ll have to turn the compost every few days or so, so that the air and temperature in your compost will rise. It should also be kept moist at all times. The decomposing process for this type is fast and usually doesn’t cause any odors. The second kind of composting is anaerobic composting. Now this is the opposite of aerobic, as it composts without having to use air. It also doesn’t require much attention, as you’ll only have to leave your organic wastes …

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