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Spring Garden Prep

In these last few days of March, there are still alot of signs of winter left in the yard. Still hard soil, little grass and only buds on trees and plants. This is the time, however, to take stock of what your yard will need to brighten up for the warmer weather. Even if the ground is still too hard to fertilize yet, it’ll be necessary to clean up the mess left behind by winter’s visit before your garden can begin to grow again. Survey your garden and remove the sticks, rocks and fallen leaves that cover your plants and bulbs. These materials make it harder for the rains that will come soon reach down to the roots of your plants, shrubs and trees. This rain is crucial to waking up your plants and giving them the shot of H2O they need to begin to bloom. Cleaning up your landscape also makes it easier for bulbs to reach out through the soil and makes it easier for you to assess what your garden will need come spring. Once you can see what you’re working with, test the ph levels in your soil to see if you need to increase or decrease the acidity. If you haven’t had your soil professionally tested in three or four years, have it done. Add an inch-deep layer of your composted materials, especially if you used tea, seaweed or fish remains in your pile. These materials can be as beneficial as commercial fertilizers for your garden, …

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Get Back Outside with Your Red Wiggler Worms and Compost!

Finally. The birds are singing again, the air is warmer and fragrant with the smells of flowers and new grass. Spring is here. All your patience and diligence during the winter means that you can now get back outside with your worms and begin cultivating your compost! As the world wakes up again along with your compost worms, it’s time to take a look and see how they fared over the long, cold winter. Keeping up a ratio of about 500 worms, around ½ pound, for every cubic foot of worm bin will ensure the best composting. If you need some worms, remember to order our robust Super Reds (Uncle Jim Worm Farm’s renowned red wiggler worms). Remove the plastic or wrapping you used to insulate your worm compost bin the last few months and check the bin itself for any cracks, leaks or oversized holes. Keeping the moisture level in your bin is important for the lifespan of your worms. If there are excessive holes that will cause drainage to happen too quickly, it’s time to replace your bin. Once you verify the stability of your compost bin and your worms, layer in some materials to kick-start your worms into composting. Adding a little more brown material for a little extra heat can move things along nicely. A little TLC at this point will keep your worms happy and decomposing your material to the best of their ability. Throw on your galoshes and shuffle on out onto the (hopefully) …

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Spend this Weekend with your Compost Heap

Weekends are a time to relax and enjoy your family and friends and this even means the red wiggler worms in your compost bin. Your worms have spent a few months in the colder climates, so they need a little TLC about now. The question is, how do you show your worms you need them and want them around, especially come spring, when they never really ask for anything? Stop In and Say Hi Plan a visit to your wriggly neighbors this weekend to let them know you haven’t forgotten about them. Take time while you’re there to check out the condition of your worm compost bin, to see if there are any holes or cracks that could mean leaks. If you see them, patch them up with duct tape or wrap that part of the bin in plastic to keep the contents, and your worms, inside for the rest of the cold season.

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House and Lifestyle Maintenance for your Red Wiggler Worms: Compost 101

You’ve started composting with red wiggler worms, which, by the way, are the very best little natural farmers on the planet. They eat the residual organic materials and from it make the loamy, nutrient-enriched compost that can be used in yards, gardens and lawns to replenish and rebuild their natural strengths and beauty. Residing in a worm farm, your red wiggler worms need the normal TLC anyone living on your property would need. They need a place to live, they need that home maintained and they need food to eat to survive. Worm bins come in a slew of sizes and types, both for indoor and outdoor use. Depending on the size of your yard, house or apartment, you can choose the size and type of compost bin you want for your needs. The amount of food waste your household produces is a good indicator of how many worms and the size compost bin you’ll need.

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Facts on Organic Gardening

Interested in venturing into some Organic Farming? Why not try it. It’s actually a great way to produce crops organically; and at the same time, works in accordance with the environment. The use of chemicals on your farm produce is a thumbs down, as organic farming uses nothing but untreated raw materials for its crops. So if you want to generate and harvest crops that are high in nutritional value, and are safe (without having to post any harm to humans, animals, and nature) to use and consume, then grow organically. Just like organic gardening draws the need and usage for non-toxic materials, farming organically goes the same way. Crops that have been produced through this process are safe to eat just like any food that you might have in mind right now. And since natural raw materials are only used to improve its nutritional value and quality, you can be assured that it’s grown with considerably less pesticides to it (especially when you get to compare it with crops that have been grown using chemical fertilizers).

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Using Coffee grounds for Vermicomposting

When you’re sipping your favorite cup of coffee (whether you had some brewed at home or had ordered a cup from your favorite coffee shop), did you ever wonder where these things go afterwards? Well coffee grounds can still be quite useful. Besides having to use it as part of your skin and hair regimen, or as a soil and garden supplement, you can also use these as food for your compost worms. You can read through this article to find out more about the benefits of this essential ingredient. Grounds from your coffee are of organic matter. So instead of having to throw these away after use, you may just put in some to your composting worms bin (whether you’re into raising and breeding nightcrawler worms or red worms). Not only are you providing nourishment to your composting worms, you’re also helping mother nature experience a garbage-less environment.

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Things you need to know about Organic Gardening

There might come a time wherein you will need to ward off pests from your garden’s soil and plants; or a time wherein you’ll need to look for efficient ways to further develop your plants growth. Now this is where organic gardening can help. Organic gardening encourages the use of non toxic materials that can be directly applied on your yard. In other words, fertilizers and pest control products that are used for this approach are all naturally made. Other than that, the organic scraps from your yard and kitchen can then be turned into a valuable source of compost (can also be used as mulch or as a top dressing), for which you can use for gardening needs later on. And just like what organic farming can also benefit from, organic compost is made out of scraps that are regularly generated from household consumption. These can be in the form of vegetable and fruit peels, coffee grounds, crushed egg shells, dried leaves, plants and flowers, grass clippings, animal manure (from plant eating animals only), and newspaper or cardboard shreds.

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A Few Handy Ways of Making Compost

There are a lot of organic and raw materials from your yard (if you happen to have one) and from your home (from regular household wastes) that can still be reused by means of composting. Making compost might look complicated for some but the only thing that you’ll need to get this process going smoothly is to provide the right elements for it. Nature itself will help continue the process for you. So read more to know how to efficiently produce compost. You should also know that there are three common types of composting, and these are vermicomposting, aerobic and anaerobic . All three have their differences when it comes to content and timeframe; but all of these produce have the same results, and that’s to create a rich, crumbly, and earth-smelling finished product (made out of recycled kitchen scraps and garden wastes) that can help supplement your plants and soil.

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Building a Compost Bin

Have you ever recycled, but not just by doing the segregation process (biodegradables from non-biodegradables)? Well, there is another way to recycle your everyday household wastes, and that’s through composting. You can easily make an organic-based fertilizer by just composting the scraps from your kitchen and yard. And what better way to do this than to buy or make your very own compost bin. Here’s a guide to building a compost bin of your own, right at the comforts of your own home. There are five methods to making compost (amongst these five methods, composting bins can be used for the last three mentioned), and the following are: soil incorporation – organic scraps are mixed and buried under ground (at least 8 inches below the surface) compost heaps – has no definite construction worm composting system – red wigglers or nightcrawlers are placed inside the bin to help in the breaking down of decomposing organic materials holding units – can hold organic scraps until the composting process finishes turning units – bins that can be turned (rotating bin types) on a regular basis

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Maintaining a Can-O-Worms Worm Bin

When it comes to a Can-O-Worms, how do you maintain such a Worm Bin for vermicomposting purposes? Just like any worm composter, it will always need some care and upkeep. Not only will bacteria, fungi, insects and other microorganisms be present in the system, there will be worms to your care as well. These worms will also be the ones to help recycle your organic scraps at home, so it’s just suitable to look out for them, as if they were like your pets. Heed their needs, and they’ll be able to produce for you some nutrient-rich and valuable source of compost. When it comes to composting, the best earthworm for the job are the Red wiggler worms. Red wigglers eat a lot (they can actually consume organic materials more than their weight for each day), can multiply in number real fast, and can live-off of spaces that are confined and congested. Unlike nightcrawlers that like to burrow and dislike being in congested places, red wigglers are the total opposite.

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