Ready to Be a Worm Farmer? Two Worm Kits to Start you Off!

We’re happy to report the trend towards bulk and commercial composting continues to grow, which means that demand for composting equipment and products, like the red wiggler worms, are going to continue to expand. As the composting practice increases around the country, there is a good chance they there will be an increased need for red wiggler worms in your neck of the woods before too long. Get started on your worm farming now with any of these three pre-packaged worm kits.   Worm Farm Kit Looking for something bigger than a hobby?  Well then create your own worm farm!  The farm kit comes loaded with double the worms, double the bedding, and double the feed!  Well-beyond the capacity of the young, school-child.   This kit is intended for the aspiring tycoon, the striving mogul, and the motivated entrepreneur; plenty of worms to raise, plenty of learning to achieve, and plenty of space in the container for the worms to breed!  For those fearless individuals looking for more than a science project, round-up a farm kit and let your ambitions run wild!         Worm Ranch Kit The biggest bloat we have, our Ranch kit.  This doesn’t come in some dinky 6 inch tall container, but instead, an 11 inch deep, thunder tub!  Serious wormers only, because this tub is no joke; bloated with bedding and feed for 2,000 red wrigglers, enough room for maximum breeding, and plenty of space to stuff your table scraps to make a miniature …

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Composting 101: Organic Composting

Organic composting is one of the best ways in minimizing land fill accumulation. Not only that, composting food scraps from your kitchen or yard can also be a good way to recycle. This home composting process will also allow you to produce your own natural fertilizer, which can be used for your lawn or garden. It’s really easy to make and use, and is definitely packed with a load full of nutrients. You can do your own composting at home by simply preparing the following materials: compost pile/bin, some food scraps from your kitchen (make sure that these doesn’t contain meat, poultry, or dairy stuff as not to attract unwanted pests), some grass clippings, dried leaves, sawdust, paper towels or newspaper, a pitch fork or a garden hoe. Your first step is to put your outdoor composter in a place a bit away from the house, in the shade and under shelter such as a tree, bushes, shed or overhang. After this, add then your organic scraps from the kitchen and/or lawn into the compost bin. In addition to the previously mentioned organic scraps, you can also put in organic stuff like vegetable and fruit peels, bread, coffee grounds, tea bag filters, tea leaves, and some pulled weeds (just to name a few). Composting bins should be watered afterwards, but put in just the right amount. The contents of your bin should always be kept moist and not soggy wet. Make sure that you use water that is chlorine-free. But …

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