How to Avoid Over-Feeding Composting Worms

If you are composting with worms, you need to feed them the right quantity of food scraps. How much food is too much? Over-feeding your composting worms can cause problems in the bin, including odors, acidity, excess moisture, pests and sick worms. What should you do to prevent and address these issues? Here are Uncle Jim’s guidelines for feeding the right amount of scraps to composting worms. Quick Check: How Much Food is In There? Dig around in the bin. How much undigested organic material is in there? The worms should start working on a feeding within a few days…

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A Guide to Successful Indoor Composting with Worms

Vermicomposting can be done almost anywhere, indoors and out. Using worms to break down your food scraps is great for the environment. Composting results in a dark, rich fertilizer that is perfect for gardening. Composting indoors is a bit trickier, but it can be done successfully. Uncle Jim’s Worm Farm offers this easy-to-use guide to indoor composting with worms. Reasons why people compost indoors include: want convenient indoor access to the composting bin concern that composting worms outdoors won’t survive the winter (although they might lay eggs or could be replaced with a fresh bag of worms in the spring)…

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Why are My Composting Worms Trying to Escape?

Worms in a vermicomposting bin sometimes try to escape. If it’s just one or two adventurous worms, you don’t have much to worry about. However, if you see worms clumping near the top of the bin, at the air ducts, or climbing out, something may be amiss. Let’s find out why composting worms try to escape, and what you can do about it. Note: Worms are sensitive to the weather. If a low pressure system or thunderstorm is moving in, the worms might start clumping and climbing. Watch for a while and see if this is the pattern. If so,…

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How to Screen Compost – Separate Fertilizer from Worms, Sticks, and Debris

In this article and video, Uncle Jim’s Worm Farm gives you step-by-step instructions for screening compost. Screening compost is a common way of improving the quality of finished compost. After kitchen scraps and gardening waste has been broken down over several months, it’s almost ready to be applied to the garden. Running it through a screen has many benefits: removes sticks, debris, produce stickers and uncomposted food scraps adds air breaks down clumps into fine pieces removes composting worms, so they can be returned to the composting bin The finer the compost, the better. Good growing soil is loose and…

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Community Garden Composting: Why and How

Community gardening projects are popping up all over. Setting up a garden helps bring the neighborhood together, makes use of wasted space, improves air quality, provides food for insects and birds, and produces fresh food. If you are involved in setting up a community garden, you need to include a system for composting leftover vegetation. Uncle Jim’s Worm Farm offers these ideas and instructions for establishing functional and safe composting systems. Why Your Community Garden Needs a Composting System If this is the first time you are gardening on this scale,

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Small-Scale Composting with Worms: Vermiculture in the City

Turning kitchen scraps into valuable fertilizer might sound unrealistic to a household in the city. Aren’t composters usually on a large piece of land? No! Vermiculture means using worms to break down food scraps. Their stealth and speed mean you can compost right in your kitchen, balcony or rooftop! Small-scale vermiculture is one way that an urban dweller can help save the environment. It also creates excellent fertilizer for plants, and it’s a fun project. The problem with tossing kitchen scraps in the trash is that mixed garbage stinks! It attracts pests and takes energy to get moved out of…

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What Can I feed my Worms?

A frequently asked question if not the most asked question I get is, “What can I feed my worms?!” So I have decided to come up with a basic list of what you can feed your worms. I will also include a list of things to keep out of the worm bin. Things to feed your worms include: Fruits Vegetables Paper Squash and Pumpkin Eggshells Coffee Bread Pasta Tea Bags Grains Hair Lawn Clippings (aged, fresh clippings may heat up and kill the worms) Animal Manure (not dog or cat) Here is a very basic list of what to not…

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How Does Composting Reduce Trash Problems?

Separating recyclables from the trash helps the environment, but you could help even more by composting. Kitchen scraps, yard waste and even scrap paper can be composted right in your home or yard. Reducing household trash can have a big impact on the environment. You can compost in a pile or bin, and you can add Red Worms to speed up the process. When the process is complete, you can harvest fertilizer for your garden and house plants. When organic matter is separated and composted, you have less trash in the landfill, less incineration, and fewer pests rummaging through the…

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What Are the Different Kinds of Composting?

compost

Composting means breaking down organic material. There are three kinds: aerobic, anaerobic, and vermicomposting. Each has its pros and cons. Households, farms, restaurants, schools, offices and places of business produce compostable materials. For example, food scraps, grass clippings, leaves, animal manure, and coffee grounds are all compostable. Composting is useful for making inexpensive fertilizer for lawns, gardens and farms. Here is a run-down of each type. Aerobic Composting With aerobic composting, air is introduced to help break down materials quickly. The compost needs to be turned every few days. This is where a “tumble” style of composter can save a…

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The Benefits of Worm Castings on Garden Soil & Plants

Updated: June 27 2022 What Are Worm Castings? If you are looking for a safer and better fertilizer than the chemical-based products made today, you might want to use worm castings. Also known as vermicompost, it is perfect for supplementing your garden soil and plants.  Castings from composting worms have been recognized as a natural fertilizer that is packed with a lot of nutrients and minerals. Worm castings contain minerals such as concentrated nitrates, potassium, magnesium, calcium, and phosphorus.  Because it is purely organic fertilizer, worm castings can increase a plant’s yield, protect both soil and plants from diseases, and…

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