Make Your Own Seed-Starting Mix with Compost

The anticipation of the spring’s plantings gives hope to gardeners throughout the winter. Get a taste of spring four to 12 weeks before the final frost by starting seeds indoors! Making your own seed-starting mix is economical. And if you compost with worms, your wiggly friends will produce a perfect seed-starting ingredient: organic fertilizer. Certain plants, such as tomatoes and peppers, grow best when cultivated indoors before spring planting. The little plants have time to develop roots and grow strong before being subject to outdoor conditions. Growing starts extends the growing season. In the case of nightshades, most gardens cultivate a relatively small number of them, so each one counts. Garden centers and nurseries cultivate food plants and put them out for sale as the spring approaches. This seems like an easy shortcut. Buyer, beware! Did you know these plants: have a limited selection of variety. If you want heirloom plants or special varieties, you will need to start from seed. have been treated with chemicals, except if they are organic. may be worse for wear after transportation and handling. How far did they travel? are more expensive than DIY Choose Your Seeds Look at your gardening plan. Choose which types of plants you would like to start in advance. If you are unfamiliar with this, do some research. When you purchase seeds, read the seed packet for more information. You can find seeds at grocery stores, gardening centers, hardware stores, natural food stores, and online. Uncle Jim’s Worm Farm …

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Worm Blankets and Lids: Best Coverings for Your Worm Bin

Composting with worms usually involves covering the bin to control moisture. Worms respond to their environment. If their world is too wet or too dry, they will be less productive and possibly even die. Composting with worms is a great way to turn kitchen and gardening scraps to into valuable fertilizer. One key to success is finding the best covering for your worm bin. Worm bins can be indoors or outdoors. Indoor composting systems are typically small, tray-based plastic composters, such as the Worm Factory 360 (which can also go outside). The Worm Farm Kit and bins made from plastic totes can be used indoors or outdoors. Outdoors composters can be tray-based, or large bins. These can be made from plastic, wooden pallets, lumber, or chicken wire. Coverings for Indoor Composters Indoor composters are not subject to the same temperature and

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How to Grow Your Own Garden “Starts” with Compost

starts with compost

As spring approaches, many gardeners are thinking about growing their own seeds into small plants – called “starts.” Using compost is a great way to give the little plants a healthy start before planting them outside. Uncle Jim’s Worm Farm has several tools and tips for getting your starts up-and-running in time for spring planting. Yes, you can buy starts at the garden center if you want. Be aware, though, that you will be limited on the variety. Garden centers only have a limited selection of the best-known and most popular varieties of plants. Did you know that plenty of exotic

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What Is Worm Composting And How Do I Do It?

  Worm composting also known as vermicomposting  is the use of earthworms to convert organic waste into fertilizer. If you are already an avid composter then transitioning over to worm composting should be a relatively easy task. But even if you have never heard the term vermicomposting and barely understand composting, you can still vermicompost! Just follow along to see how easy it really can be!   In order to get started composting with worms you will need a few things: bin/container/composter/enclosed space bedding moisture/proper PH temperature control compostable matter worms   The first thing you will want to figure out when it comes to worm composting is where you are going to do all of this. Many people will start off with a simple plastic bin which you can pretty much get at any retail or hardware store. You will want to drill holes in the bin for proper ventilation and drainage. The bin can range in size based off  your composting needs but should be a depth of at least 6 inches for the worms. People have also used containers such as old bathtubs or freezers. However, if you have the money and would like a simple composter for your worms to do their thing you can invest in a composter specifically designed for vermicomposting. Popular composters include the Worm Factory 360 and the Can-O-Worms. Both of which are available through our site. These composters are great because they come with everything you need to set up your …

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Worm Composting Equipment

One thing that makes worm composting so enjoyable is how easy it is to get started. A lot of DIY organic gardeners out there are drawn to the idea of worm composting because it doesn’t cost much, it doesn’t require a lot of your time, and it’s a great way to reuse food waste that would otherwise be thrown away in the trash. Sound interesting? I haven’t even begun to talk about the benefits of the compost yet! Compost is the keystone of organic gardening. If you want your plants to grow bigger, produce more and look lush and healthy, then worm composting is the answer. Anyone can begin worm composting, and it might surprise you to know that you might have almost everything you need to build a worm composting system that works like a charm! For everything else that you don’t have, Uncle Jim’s Worm Farm has it all. We have everything ranging from kitchen compost carriers and pails to complete worm composting kits! To help you sort through the myriad of supplies out there and get what you need, I want to break down some of the vermicomposting equipment for you. The Equipment You Need This can be narrowed down to the following question; what do the worms need? The answer is super simple. Food – worms need to eat just like any other living organism, except worms can eat up to half of their own weight! Don’t worry though, they’re slow eaters and if you’re anything …

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Lawn Care: How often can you spray your lawn with worm tea?

Worm tea like most fertilizers, is a product that can be directly applied on your lawn without having to worry about burning it (unlike the usage of chemical fertilizers). It’s an organic solution that can instantly be absorbed by the grass, and is something that’s made readily available for the sod’s consumption. Now worm compost tea is actually worm castings that have been previously oxygenated and submerged in chlorine-free water. You can learn more about the right use and application for worm compost tea by reading further of this article. Worm Tea Supplies Vermicomposting tea can be done by gathering the following supplies: your supply of worm castings, an old sock (should be hole-less so that the compost doesn’t seep out), some dechlorinated water (you can also use tap water that’s been left to settle for about 24 hours), some molasses or corn syrup, a 5-gallon bucket, and a bubbler. How to create worm tea The water that you’ll be using for the tea should be chlorine-free. It’s best to keep it that way so that you don’t destroy the live microbes that will be present in the system. Now, have your old sock filled with some castings. Have the sock tied securely before submerging it in the water. As soon as the sock is soaked, add in some molasses or corn syrup (either organic substances will be used as food for the live organisms contained in the tea). The last step is to set-up the bubbler (aerating the tea …

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Using Eggshells in Vermicomposting

Aside from selected organic kitchen scraps and garden wastes, crushed eggshells also play a vital role when it comes to worm composting. Not only can it be used as food for your compost pals, it can also be included as an added material for your worm bins bedding. You can learn a lot more from this versatile ingredient by reading more of this article. Eggshells as food for composting worms Composting worms can absolutely be fed with crushed shells from eggs. You should know that compost worms will eat just about anything that’s organic (all except meat, seafood, poultry, dairy, oily, or spicy stuff). Aside from egg shells, you can also feed them scraps from your kitchen (fruit or vegetable peels, coffee grounds, old and stripped carton boxes, used tea bags) or garden (dried leaves, grass clippings, presoaked peat moss, coconut coir, twigs, barks).   How to apply eggshells inside the worm composting bin Amongst other organic wastes, shells from eggs can be buried in the ground or sprinkled (you can pulverize the shells to make it more finer for sprinkling) on top of the bedding. Make sure that when you crush the shells, egg residue isn’t left over. You can also ensure this by drying it out first before mashing the shells into pieces. Now, if you happen to put in too much fruit scraps inside the bin (which may likely cause the bin to become from acidic later on), you may neutralize the bedding by sprinkling some of …

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