Lawn Care: How often can you spray your lawn with worm tea?

Worm tea like most fertilizers, is a product that can be directly applied on your lawn without having to worry about burning it (unlike the usage of chemical fertilizers). It’s an organic solution that can instantly be absorbed by the grass, and is something that’s made readily available for the sod’s consumption. Now worm compost tea is actually worm castings that have been previously oxygenated and submerged in chlorine-free water. You can learn more about the right use and application for worm compost tea by reading further of this article. Worm Tea Supplies Vermicomposting tea can be done by gathering the following supplies: your supply of worm castings, an old sock (should be hole-less so that the compost doesn’t seep out), some dechlorinated water (you can also use tap water that’s been left to settle for about 24 hours), some molasses or corn syrup, a 5-gallon bucket, and a bubbler. How to create worm tea The water that you’ll be using for the tea should be chlorine-free. It’s best to keep it that way so that you don’t destroy the live microbes that will be present in the system. Now, have your old sock filled with some castings. Have the sock tied securely before submerging it in the water. As soon as the sock is soaked, add in some molasses or corn syrup (either organic substances will be used as food for the live organisms contained in the tea). The last step is to set-up the bubbler (aerating the tea …

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Uncle Jim’s Worm Farm

Generally, when it comes to vermicomposting, red wigglers have been able to surpass all the other worm species when their ability as composters are put to work. Composting with these worms using organic wastes keeps them alive and thriving. They can live with and eat off of decomposing food wastes for as long as they can. And the best part about them is that they’re also able to produce a valuable source of fertilizer and soil amendment (great for gardens or farms). These fascinating attributes and more will be tackled further in this article. Red wiggler worms and their different yet effective skills Not only are red worms the best composting earthworms, they’re also noted for several other interesting things. Apart from having the ability to eat half of their own weight on a daily basis, they’re also able to produce a rich source of fertilizer (out of their organic meals). It’s also through their constant production of compost (also known as worm poop or castings) that they’re also able to nourish all kinds of plant species (application of worm castings on the soil that has plants rooted in it). Red wiggler worms have also been recognized as the most quickest and most effective when it comes to decomposing and producing compost. Apart from that, they’ve also been identified as the most prolific when it comes to breeding. They can multiply quite fast (worms are able to lay eggs every 10 days), and can populate their bins (or any other …

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Organic Gardening: How to Choose the Most Suitable Worm Bin for Your Composting Worms

There are four basic types of worm composters: the bins, flow throughs, stackables, and beds. Each of these worm bin types can be the best one for your vermicomposting project. To know which of these composters will suit your preferences will, read furthermore of this article. Bins for worm use A bin can be in the form of any container that is most often than not, box-like in shape (can be used as indoor or outdoor worm bins). Mostly these are also shaped using materials that are in the form of plastic and wood (can be of lumber or plywood material). Old items in the house such as a recycled trash bin, a busted refrigerator, a broken  toilet, or an old wooden drawer can be turned into a make-shift worm composter. A Flow through for worm use A flow through is much like a bin (a box-type bin that can either be used as outdoor or indoor worm bins), as the food scraps flow-through the bin downwards. But in this set-up, the worm castings are harvested from the bottom of the container (unlike bin’s where castings are typically harvested on top of the bedding). It works by feeding the worm from the topmost part of the composter. And as the worms progress to producing these organic scraps into rich compost, their castings also gradually fall down to the base of the composter (there is a hole and a grid attached on the bottom part of the bin that helps separate …

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Eisenia Foetida: Red worms composting guide for organic gardening

Red worms composting has been one of several composting methods that are being widely used by earth enthusiasts today. Other than the profit ventures that one can also tap into when vermicomposting, this natural process can certainly help recycle daily household waste on a continual level. It can also be utilized by people who have space restrictions (can be favorable for people who own houses with a yard space and for those who have none like apartment dwellers), so it’s that flexible to maintain and have around. Setting-up a Red Worms Farm Before you can provide additional supplement to your organic garden (in this manner with the cultivation and use of worm castings fertilizer), you must first set-up a home for your red worms (make sure to place their bin where they’re away from direct sunlight – room temperature is ideal). You’ll need a worm bin (a container that can either be made out of wood or plastic), your supply of worms (you can start with about 2,000 red wigglers), some organic bedding materials (you can go with some presoaked newspaper strips with some dead leaves), and of course some worm food (cut pieces of kitchen and yard scraps). Drilled holes on the worm bin A conducive environment for your red worms would be a place where there’s enough moisture to go around and where oxygen is abundant. You can provide both for your red composting worms by drilling holes around the compost bin. You’ll need to drill evenly spaced …

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Composting and Yard care Alternatives that can be Practiced at Home

There are plenty of ways to make the world a better place to live in. And becoming more aware of the environments needs by doing your simple composting and recycling acts at home can go along way. So instead of using chemicals to supplement your garden or to spend money on unnecessary materials, here are a few composting and yard care alternatives that can be done at home to save you on costs, energy, time, and other resources. Alternatives for composting There are different ways to turn your organic scraps into nutrient-rich compost. You can always opt to choose the aerobic method (uses oxygen to breakdown organic wastes) or the anaerobic method (does not require oxygen to be able to start producing finished compost). But aside from that, worm composting using Red wigglers or European Nightcrawlers can also be used to help generate this natural product for your lawn. You can opt to use the latter option since vermicomposting has been recognized to be the fastest way to produce organic fertilizer and natural pest product (there’s a big difference to using chemical fertilizer vs organic fertilizer). Not only are these worms able to breakdown the food and garden scraps more finely, they’re also able to produce these faster than any other composting method (you can harvest worm castings in just a few months). And since the scraps that are being turned into a valuable resource are free, you will also get the chance to recycle these without having to spend …

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The Best Worm Species for Vermicomposting

The best worm species when it comes to worm composting would be your typical nightcrawlers and red wiggler worms. But if you’re looking for the best worm type to help you well with the decomposition of your organic debris, then turn to the king of all wormery worms – the Red Wigglers. But other than these earth miracle workers, there are other compost worms that work well in the composting scenario. Epigeic Worms Epigeic worms are typically used for vermicomposting (such as the Eisenia Fetida for example). They’re the type that likes to settle on top soil (does less burrowing), and likes to eat and live off of organic scraps.  They also adapt well when placed inside a worm composting bin or worm bed. The Blue Worm Blue worms can also be distinguished as the traveling worm or the the India blue worm. This worm specie is also native to the tropical parts of Asia. Also known as the Perionyx Excavatus, the blue worm can also grow for as long as 1 ¼ to 2 ¾ inches in length. These crawlers also prefer to be in warmer temperatures that range from 70 to 80 degrees Fahrenheit. You can expect for these worms to also reach the adult stage between a 3 to 5 week timeframe. The African Nightcrawler Also known as Eudrilus Eugeniae, the African Nightcrawler is a tropical worm. It can stand higher temperatures provided that they are given with enough moisture (this only means that African Nightcrawlers will …

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Growing Potted Plants with Red Wigglers

Growing potted plants using healthy soil will create nothing but good garden produce. Whether you’ll be growing fruits, vegetables, herbs, or even flowers, planting these in soil that is well-nourished, will develop well through time; more so when you pot them using red wigglers castings. Compost from worms are food waste that are broken down during a quick timeframe. These organic scraps, in their finer and richer form, will also return back to the earth with more nutrients in tow. Apart from its other beneficial uses, it also helps support all the other microbes that also depend on the soil for their survival. Red worms castings The physical look of worm castings actually resemble that of the soil from the ground. It’s crumbly to the touch, and is also dark-brown in shade (although it’s also been referred to as black topsoil). The benefits to using red wiggler worms castings Red wiggler worms are certainly important organisms that can truly help build beneficial soil. Besides turning organic wastes into rich soil, red worms also have the ability to aerate the soil that they’re in, (helps introduce oxygen into the soil), and also enhances the soil conditions for all the other beneficial organisms present in the soil (such as good bacteria, fungus, etc.). The Eisenia foetida (the scientific name for red wiggler worms) worm is actually a vegetarian. It only means that this earthworm only eats off of natural materials (except for a few wastes such as meat or poultry, as these …

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What is the best composting worm to use for organic gardening?

There are actually two common types of composting worms, and these are the Eisenia fetida (red wiggler worm), and the Eisenia hortensis (European Nightcrawler). But the most favorable composting worm would be the first one, the red wiggler worm. Red Wiggler Worms Although nightcrawler worms can also be used for vermicomposting purposes, red wigglers are typically the most preferred as they’re most effective when processing organic scraps. Also known as the brandling or manure worm, this type of earthworm can grow for as long as 1.5 to 2.5 inches; and can also eat as much as half of its weight on a daily basis. These worm composting worms are also able to produce at least 5 cocoons every week (these worms have been considered to be very prolific breeders); and will only start hatching under warmer conditions. Eggs that are incubated under cold temperatures will also take longer to hatch. Where to find red wiggler worms Red wiggler worms like to eat off of organic scraps. They thrive and enjoy the very sight of it. They’re also Epigeic worms (surface dwellers). They can be found buried just below the surface of the soil, and won’t be found deeper than 1 foot from the surface (considered as the best soil aerators). You may also be able to find some burrowing within compost heaps or piles of leaves, or even in days old animal manure. Otherwise, you’ll only be able to get a hold of some by buying through the internet or …

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Production of Worm Castings: How valuable is it?

Did you know that worms are capable of creating an organic fertilizer product? Yes, you’ve ready it right! Worms are not only good when it comes to breaking down decomposing organic scraps (scraps that are regularly accumulated from your yard or kitchen). They’re also great when it comes to turning these raw materials into a valuable source of compost. Application of worm castings on your garden or farm can offer your plants and soil with nutrients and more. Read more from this article to find out why castings from worms are priceless. Castings – Priceless but very inexpensive to obtain Worm castings compost is priceless but not in the monetary sense. So how to go about this? Well these are actually very cheap to obtain since you’ll only need a batch of worms, a composter, bedding materials, and some organic food for your start-up. You’ll just have to give the proper care and maintenance that these worms need, and you’re off to doubling the breed of your worms in no time. In this case, you’ll no longer have to worry about buying your new stock of worms as these soil creatures are also capable of reproducing quickly (you’ll be able to see newborn worms in more or less 6 weeks). Castings – Priceless and Profitable Just imagine a double in numbers. It will only mean more worms and more opportunities for harvesting worm castings. But did you know that you can also sell your worms as fish bait to fishermen, …

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Using Eggshells in Vermicomposting

Aside from selected organic kitchen scraps and garden wastes, crushed eggshells also play a vital role when it comes to worm composting. Not only can it be used as food for your compost pals, it can also be included as an added material for your worm bins bedding. You can learn a lot more from this versatile ingredient by reading more of this article. Eggshells as food for composting worms Composting worms can absolutely be fed with crushed shells from eggs. You should know that compost worms will eat just about anything that’s organic (all except meat, seafood, poultry, dairy, oily, or spicy stuff). Aside from egg shells, you can also feed them scraps from your kitchen (fruit or vegetable peels, coffee grounds, old and stripped carton boxes, used tea bags) or garden (dried leaves, grass clippings, presoaked peat moss, coconut coir, twigs, barks).   How to apply eggshells inside the worm composting bin Amongst other organic wastes, shells from eggs can be buried in the ground or sprinkled (you can pulverize the shells to make it more finer for sprinkling) on top of the bedding. Make sure that when you crush the shells, egg residue isn’t left over. You can also ensure this by drying it out first before mashing the shells into pieces. Now, if you happen to put in too much fruit scraps inside the bin (which may likely cause the bin to become from acidic later on), you may neutralize the bedding by sprinkling some of …

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