Tips on Storing Worm Tea

There are a lot of things that you can do with worm castings; and one of them would be to make tea out of worm poop from red wrigglers, and nightcrawlers. To find out more, you should read a few facts in this article about tips on storing worm tea, and more. Worm compost tea is basically made through a brewing process. It’s created by immersing the castings of worms into the water (the castings are usually enclosed in a cloth bag, and is tied so nothing seeps out from the bag as soon as it is submerged in the water). The nutrients and the other good bacteria that’s contained in the castings are then released into the water. It’s when the water is aerated that the microorganisms grow and multiply in number (an oxygen-rich environment is produced). This worm tea dilution then becomes your liquid organic fertilizer. So, how do you exactly make worm compost tea? Well, you’re going to have to prepare a bucket that can hold a gallon, and then some dechlorinated water.

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How to make Worm Tea out of worm castings

After worm composting, what then becomes of its deposits? Now this is where the organic fertilizers come into the picture. Worm by-product can simply be used in three ways: as an organic fertilizer (still in its earthy soil state) for your plants, as a soil conditioner, and as a liquid fertilizer. The liquid fertilizer that has leached out from you worm bin is what we call worm tea. There are simple how to steps in producing your very own tea from worms. So, how do you make worm tea exactly? How to create tea from worm manure Worm manure in liquid form can be a great organic soil amendment, and is definitely odorless. You can create tea from worm poop by simply preparing the needed materials for this: a worm bin, a small rake (the hand-held type), a muslin bag, a large bucket, some water, and a squirt bottle. You can start with this simple brewing process by following these easy steps: From the bottom part of your worm bin, you will see some castings on top of it. Rake these off from the bin, which you will then place directly into the muslin bag. As soon as you’ve filled the bag with worm castings, tie it right away so that you can secure the contents of it (especially when you completely submerge it into the water). You’re going to have to submerge the muslin bag (containing the castings from red wigglers or nightcrawlers, whichever worm source it was from) …

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Tips on Harvesting Worm Castings

For some worm composters, harvesting worm castings can be a very tasking thing to do. You’re going to have to try your hand at separating the castings from the worms, at a thorough manner. But then again, a lot of worm bins make harvesting easier to do, but there are also some that aren’t as conducive. You’ll know that your worm bin has been filled-up with castings as soon as you see rich, earthy soil stuff in it. It’s also easier to harvest these worm castings if you have those stackable units at home. You’ll only have to take out the bottom tray, and empty it afterwards (you can store the castings inside another container). But if you want to try other common approaches to harvesting worm poop, then you can try the following tips: Tip 1: Since red wiggler worms are sensitive to light, you can separate them from their castings by simply shunning some light on them (you can probably use a lamp or flashlight for this); and they will instantly burrow back into the bottom part of the soil. So, as soon as the worms disappear, you can then scan through some worm manure that has been casted aside. Scoop from the top pile all the way to the bottom, using either a shovel or your hands. And if you happen to scoop in some worms, you can just put them back right in their bin. Plus, you won’t have to worry about the smell or the …

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What to feed Red Wigglers

When you’re breeding earthworms, it’s not enough that you provide them a nice and comfortable bin to thrive in. You should also be able to provide the right food supply to them. So, what to feed red wigglers then, you might ask? Read on further below to know more. What to feed Red Wiggler worms When you’re raising red worms, it’s best that you feed them only what is good for their diet. There are certain organic wastes that they can eat, and also can’t eat. So, you really have to be very knowledgeable about what to feed them with. So feeding them, comes with a little bit of care and maintenance as well. Feeding red wigglers is actually simple. You’ll just have to feed them decomposing organic wastes, that have been cut or chopped into smaller pieces already; and are then buried under the ground (to sway away from unwanted visits from pests and to also avoid odor build-ups). Moving forward, the best thing that you can feed your red wigglers is animal manure. Only feed them something that has been days old already; and have been produced by vegetable eating animals, like rabbits for example (manure from pets are not as healthy especially for worm consumption). Aside from animal manure, you can also feed them the following organic wastes: Crushed Egg Shells – adds that much needed grit for the worm’s digestion. It also provides calcium, helps in the worms reproduction, and also helps in increasing the pH …

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Red Wiggler worms’ Life Cycle and stages

You know those slimy red worms that you use when your composting organic scraps in your yard? Well, they’re scientifically referred to as Eisenia Foetida. Red worms go by this name, and others more like Tiger worms, Manure worms, and Red Wriggler worms. Red Wiggler worms life cycle and stages can differ for each, as factors like a moist environment and overfeeding can either prolong their lifespan or not. To learn more about this worm species, you can read further below. Red Wiggler worms start out as cocoons (contains about 4 to 6 baby worms only), and begin with the Egg stage. When adult worms give birth or deliver worm eggs, their eggs will typically be in a grape seed-like size. So you can imagine how tiny it can be. But aside from that, these eggs will usually go through an incubation process of 23 days (more or less); and will then change its egg case color from golden yellow to maroon-like. These will then start to probably hatch after 3 to 4 weeks. Now after the egg stage, comes the Juvenile (young) stage. Baby worms at this point (after hatching out of their eggs) will start out with no reproductive organs but will be able to develop it after some time. They will also be just about half an inch in length size, and can be no thicker than four human hairs combined. Although they can start eating heavy already, they can be immediately used for vermicomposting. To learn …

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Composting 101: Worm Bin Composting

Worm Bin composting come in different shapes and sizes. You can either build this on your own or purchase a commercial bin. So whichever of these choices suit your taste, these still need to pass a certain standard. Your preferred vermicomposting bin should be chemical-free, should have a good aeration system, and should be handy for use all year round. Of course, your type of earthworm to use should be factored in when maintaining compost bins such as this. You might be able to see a lot of worms in your garden, and you might think that these will do. Well, you’re wrong. Simply put, these garden worms will die if you were to put them inside a worm bin. So, you’ll need the right type of worm specie that can very well live in this type of setup, like Red Wrigglers for example. These red worms are able to adapt and thrive in an environment that is filled with decomposing organic materials. You can get a hold of these red worms from local bait shops near you, or have these shipped to you instead (there are several worm farms listed in the directory and online). So when you’ve found the right specie of earthworm to raise (red wrigglers that is), then you may very well proceed to setting up your red worm bin. So to start off, your worm composting bin should have a cool, and always moist bedding. You can put in your kitchen or lawn wastes by …

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Composting 101: Organic Composting

Organic composting is one of the best ways in minimizing land fill accumulation. Not only that, composting food scraps from your kitchen or yard can also be a good way to recycle. This home composting process will also allow you to produce your own natural fertilizer, which can be used for your lawn or garden. It’s really easy to make and use, and is definitely packed with a load full of nutrients. You can do your own composting at home by simply preparing the following materials: compost pile/bin, some food scraps from your kitchen (make sure that these doesn’t contain meat, poultry, or dairy stuff as not to attract unwanted pests), some grass clippings, dried leaves, sawdust, paper towels or newspaper, a pitch fork or a garden hoe. Your first step is to put your outdoor composter in a place a bit away from the house, in the shade and under shelter such as a tree, bushes, shed or overhang. After this, add then your organic scraps from the kitchen and/or lawn into the compost bin. In addition to the previously mentioned organic scraps, you can also put in organic stuff like vegetable and fruit peels, bread, coffee grounds, tea bag filters, tea leaves, and some pulled weeds (just to name a few). Composting bins should be watered afterwards, but put in just the right amount. The contents of your bin should always be kept moist and not soggy wet. Make sure that you use water that is chlorine-free. But …

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Handy Tips for raising worms

Raising worms is easy, and you can even make a hobby out of it. Other than that, several worm breeders also get to make a profit out of selling these as well. There is a big demand for this in organic farming, as earthworm composts have been continuously used as a natural fertilizer for plants and soil. Either used for personal use or for business means, here are a few handy tips when raising these slimy but wonderful creatures. To get you started on your worm breeding project, you must first prepare the following things: a vermicomposting bin, some organic materials (as food supply to your worms), as well as some soil, or sand. Now after you’ve prepared all these, you may now get on with your project. So the first step to this project is deciding what earthworm type to raise. There are a lot of earthworms to choose from, and some of the most well-liked earthworms are the Red Wiggler worms, and the African Night Crawlers. The red wrigglers are usually the worms that are small in size, and is typically the easiest type to breed. The African Night Crawlers on the other hand, are the largest in size; and are usually the ones that are used for catching fish on bait. Moving forward, you can either find these worms on your own or purchase them at a local store near you (you’ll also be able to find some online). You’ll be able to find these being sold …

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Interesting Facts about Vermicomposting

Have you always been interested with vermicomposting but have never tried it before? Well, why not start now. Not only will you help mother nature in recycling your daily organic wastes, you also get to work on some very interesting organisms. To learn more, here are some remarkable facts about Vermicomposting. Vermicomposting, also known as worm composting, is a process that saves you money, recycles your organic wastes, and is also eco-friendly. This natural way of composting organic wastes is a process that involves the use of worms, and of other beneficial microbes. These worms then turn your organic scraps into a quality-made, and nutrient-filled compost (this by-product is also known as worm castings or worm manure). Worm castings help your plants and soil be at their best conditions, as these worm castings can be made into an organic fertilizer for your garden (it has an earthy smell to it); and as a soil conditioner for improving soil structure (water retention will improve). Now when it comes to what kind of worms to use, don’t use the ordinary garden worms for composting. These regular soil and garden worms will surely die if you were to use and place them inside an indoor worm bin. You should choose to use Red Wigglers for worm composting (also known as Eisenia Fetida, tiger worm, manure worm, red worm, red wiggler, brandling worm, or manure worm), since they are the best composting worms for the job; and not only that, they are the most …

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Worm Composting with Red Wiggler worms

The best earthworm species for worm composting (also known as vermicomposting) are red wiggler worms. When compared to ordinary organic composting, worm composting is better because the worms used in this type of process gets to produce more. Its by-products are nutrient-filled; and is basically a hassle-free and an eco-friendly way for recycling organic wastes. Either way, you can compost with these fascinating red worms indoors or outdoors (paves the way for a year round of composting). And just like any living thing that seeks a comfortable place to live in, Red Wiggler worms are also in need of the same thing. So before placing your compost pals in your composting bin, you should be able to prepare their bedding first. A worm bedding is usually a pile of organic materials that the worms stay and thrive in. So start by gathering materials, and then mixing all these together. These organic materials can be in the form of dried leaves, some pre-soaked and shredded newspaper or cardboard, some shredded straw, some dried clippings of grass, and some days old animal manure (don’t use pet manure for this). Your worms will also eat the materials inside the bin. So what you can further do is to put in a few more organic wastes like fruit and vegetable peels, some broken egg shells, and coffee grounds. Also, put in two handfuls of soil or sand. These materials will help provide that much needed grit for the worms to be able to digest …

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