Welcome Summer by Revitalizing Your Worms!

Can you feel the warm sun on your face? Are you watching the big, fluffy white clouds track lazily across a deep blue sky? Spring is here and that means the red wiggler worms living in your compost bin may need a little TLC to revitalize them. Clean Up the Mess To make your compost bin a little more livable for your wiggly pals, try to remove any stray sticks or rocks that may have ended up in the bin. These barricades make it difficult for your wigglers to effectively do their job of aerating the compost and can slow down the process. Keep it Humid, but Not Too Humid Good humidity levels in your compost are crucial to keep your worms happy and munching away. The summer can bring dry heat that can make the top layer of your pile dry out and increase the temperatures of the bin beyond the composting temperature of 120 to 150 degrees F. To battle the dry-out and prevent a possible burn-out, move the bin to a shaded area in your yard during the hotter months. If necessary, trickle the hose over the contents to add a bit more hydration. Also, turn the materials a little more frequently to maintain proper moisture levels all through the bin. Bring Friends to the Party As living organisms, there is always a certainty that one day you’ll head to you bin and find a few of your wriggly little buddies has move on to that great …

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Three Uses for Compost in your Yard

So, you have all that nutrient-rich compost that your red wiggler worms made out of your food and yard scraps. You understand that compost offers a better option to your yard than chemical-based feeds and products, but exactly how can you use that compost around your yard? Cover it Up: Have you used mulch in the past to cover your flower beds and under shrubs to protect against drought and weeds? Your dense compost can offer the same protection, at a fraction of the cost. Spread 2-3 inches of compost around your flowers, your trees, under your shrubs and your entire lawn will benefit from the nutrients that naturally break down into the soil. Rich Soil Feed: No more store-bought yard or flower. Dig down into your garden as you plant and toss some compost down into the hole. Spread a little around in the top soil and water it down. Your plants and flowers will thrive. Refreshing Cool Drink: Compost tea is the natural equivalent of that container of garden feed you attached to the end of your hose or mix up for your sprinkler, without the harmful chemicals.

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3 of the Most Common Misconceptions about Composting

There has been a solid wave towards adoption of composting as a practice both on the commercial and residential end in the last few years, but there are still some of you that may be wary of starting your own compost bin. Yes, my composting friends, some of your neighbors, some of your friends, even some of your family members may avoid taking the composting plunge due to the following misconceptions. Read on and then take it upon yourself to educate them: The smell. The number one fear of the compost-challenged, this issue is usually the first derailer of any potential composter and is not even a reality. No well maintained compost bin that is monitored regularly for pH and moisture levels will have any smell. Period. I won’t have a use for it. Compost is not dirt, it is organic feed for your garden and yard. You can use it for your grass, your trees, your flower beds and your shrubs. Have a little left over – give it to your neighbor. No time to manage it. Composting takes only a few minutes every couple of days to manage. Turning your compost, checking the pH levels and adding organic materials to your bin can all be done in a short time. While the setup may be a little intensive, once it’s ready, time involvement is very manageable. Better yet, composting with red wiggler worms takes even more stress off you in that they really do all the work, munching through …

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Spend this Weekend with your Compost Heap

Weekends are a time to relax and enjoy your family and friends and this even means the red wiggler worms in your compost bin. Your worms have spent a few months in the colder climates, so they need a little TLC about now. The question is, how do you show your worms you need them and want them around, especially come spring, when they never really ask for anything? Stop In and Say Hi Plan a visit to your wriggly neighbors this weekend to let them know you haven’t forgotten about them. Take time while you’re there to check out the condition of your worm compost bin, to see if there are any holes or cracks that could mean leaks. If you see them, patch them up with duct tape or wrap that part of the bin in plastic to keep the contents, and your worms, inside for the rest of the cold season.

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Using Coffee grounds for Vermicomposting

When you’re sipping your favorite cup of coffee (whether you had some brewed at home or had ordered a cup from your favorite coffee shop), did you ever wonder where these things go afterwards? Well coffee grounds can still be quite useful. Besides having to use it as part of your skin and hair regimen, or as a soil and garden supplement, you can also use these as food for your compost worms. You can read through this article to find out more about the benefits of this essential ingredient. Grounds from your coffee are of organic matter. So instead of having to throw these away after use, you may just put in some to your composting worms bin (whether you’re into raising and breeding nightcrawler worms or red worms). Not only are you providing nourishment to your composting worms, you’re also helping mother nature experience a garbage-less environment.

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The Worm Factory: The Benefits to using a Red Worm Bin

The Worm Factory is a very handy composting system that you can definitely keep for home use. Aside from that, it also comes with a lot of great benefits. Read on below to know more of its advantages. The red worm bin is compact, so you won’t have to worry about it being loosely packed together. It basically comes in a square design, and is something that goes well with areas that have limited spaces, since it comes in a stackable tray system. Worm bins in this type are also odorless. It is typically made with lids to help allow the air to move freely in and out of the container, so that odor build-up may be avoided. With this feature, you no longer have to worry on where to keep your worm bin, as it can be placed anywhere in the house. When you also buy worm bin types such as the this, you should be able to save more time just by using it. It will help do the composting for you, so that you wouldn’t have to do the constant and tedious work of having to turn the compost, and by taking out worms manually. This worm bin will simply do the segregating for you by means of its stack of trays (the multi-tray system helps in separating the worms from the compost). Apart from all these great benefits, your red wiggler worms stackable container is something that you can easily

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Tips on Storing Worm Tea

There are a lot of things that you can do with worm castings; and one of them would be to make tea out of worm poop from red wrigglers, and nightcrawlers. To find out more, you should read a few facts in this article about tips on storing worm tea, and more. Worm compost tea is basically made through a brewing process. It’s created by immersing the castings of worms into the water (the castings are usually enclosed in a cloth bag, and is tied so nothing seeps out from the bag as soon as it is submerged in the water). The nutrients and the other good bacteria that’s contained in the castings are then released into the water. It’s when the water is aerated that the microorganisms grow and multiply in number (an oxygen-rich environment is produced). This worm tea dilution then becomes your liquid organic fertilizer. So, how do you exactly make worm compost tea? Well, you’re going to have to prepare a bucket that can hold a gallon, and then some dechlorinated water.

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How to make Worm Tea out of worm castings

After worm composting, what then becomes of its deposits? Now this is where the organic fertilizers come into the picture. Worm by-product can simply be used in three ways: as an organic fertilizer (still in its earthy soil state) for your plants, as a soil conditioner, and as a liquid fertilizer. The liquid fertilizer that has leached out from you worm bin is what we call worm tea. There are simple how to steps in producing your very own tea from worms. So, how do you make worm tea exactly? How to create tea from worm manure Worm manure in liquid form can be a great organic soil amendment, and is definitely odorless. You can create tea from worm poop by simply preparing the needed materials for this: a worm bin, a small rake (the hand-held type), a muslin bag, a large bucket, some water, and a squirt bottle. You can start with this simple brewing process by following these easy steps: From the bottom part of your worm bin, you will see some castings on top of it. Rake these off from the bin, which you will then place directly into the muslin bag. As soon as you’ve filled the bag with worm castings, tie it right away so that you can secure the contents of it (especially when you completely submerge it into the water). You’re going to have to submerge the muslin bag (containing the castings from red wigglers or nightcrawlers, whichever worm source it was from) …

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Tips on Harvesting Worm Castings

For some worm composters, harvesting worm castings can be a very tasking thing to do. You’re going to have to try your hand at separating the castings from the worms, at a thorough manner. But then again, a lot of worm bins make harvesting easier to do, but there are also some that aren’t as conducive. You’ll know that your worm bin has been filled-up with castings as soon as you see rich, earthy soil stuff in it. It’s also easier to harvest these worm castings if you have those stackable units at home. You’ll only have to take out the bottom tray, and empty it afterwards (you can store the castings inside another container). But if you want to try other common approaches to harvesting worm poop, then you can try the following tips: Tip 1: Since red wiggler worms are sensitive to light, you can separate them from their castings by simply shunning some light on them (you can probably use a lamp or flashlight for this); and they will instantly burrow back into the bottom part of the soil. So, as soon as the worms disappear, you can then scan through some worm manure that has been casted aside. Scoop from the top pile all the way to the bottom, using either a shovel or your hands. And if you happen to scoop in some worms, you can just put them back right in their bin. Plus, you won’t have to worry about the smell or the …

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What to feed Red Wigglers

When you’re breeding earthworms, it’s not enough that you provide them a nice and comfortable bin to thrive in. You should also be able to provide the right food supply to them. So, what to feed red wigglers then, you might ask? Read on further below to know more. What to feed Red Wiggler worms When you’re raising red worms, it’s best that you feed them only what is good for their diet. There are certain organic wastes that they can eat, and also can’t eat. So, you really have to be very knowledgeable about what to feed them with. So feeding them, comes with a little bit of care and maintenance as well. Feeding red wigglers is actually simple. You’ll just have to feed them decomposing organic wastes, that have been cut or chopped into smaller pieces already; and are then buried under the ground (to sway away from unwanted visits from pests and to also avoid odor build-ups). Moving forward, the best thing that you can feed your red wigglers is animal manure. Only feed them something that has been days old already; and have been produced by vegetable eating animals, like rabbits for example (manure from pets are not as healthy especially for worm consumption). Aside from animal manure, you can also feed them the following organic wastes: Crushed Egg Shells – adds that much needed grit for the worm’s digestion. It also provides calcium, helps in the worms reproduction, and also helps in increasing the pH …

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