Things to know before buying red wigglers online

It will be advantageous for any composter newbie to be informed of the know-how’s of buying red wigglers online. Red wiggler worms aren’t usually seen crawling from underneath the garden, as these are reared in specialized areas such as farms (thus the terms worm farm or worm ranch). And now that many people are already into vermicomposting, it’s also expected that many people will also be into selling worms for a profit. Now most reliable merchants will be found selling on actual sites (local worm farms), as some prefer to sell their goods on the web. So to avoid being swindled with the wrong kind of worms, it’ll be best to practice with caution as well. You can get more valuable tips on buying red wiggler worms online by reading further of this article. Tip 1: It pays to read up on the online stores testimonials There will be countless of stores catering to the sale of compost worms; and you will be free to choose which of these to buy from. But before you go right ahead into purchasing your supply of red wiggler worms, start by reading up on the company’s testimonials. Feedbacks from previous customers can come in handy. So check whether there are more positive responses from the negative reactions (if there are any). The reliability of a company can also be seen in this point of view (it’s important to know how the company works with its customers). You can also get referrals from trusted …

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Production of Worm Castings: How valuable is it?

Did you know that worms are capable of creating an organic fertilizer product? Yes, you’ve ready it right! Worms are not only good when it comes to breaking down decomposing organic scraps (scraps that are regularly accumulated from your yard or kitchen). They’re also great when it comes to turning these raw materials into a valuable source of compost. Application of worm castings on your garden or farm can offer your plants and soil with nutrients and more. Read more from this article to find out why castings from worms are priceless. Castings – Priceless but very inexpensive to obtain Worm castings compost is priceless but not in the monetary sense. So how to go about this? Well these are actually very cheap to obtain since you’ll only need a batch of worms, a composter, bedding materials, and some organic food for your start-up. You’ll just have to give the proper care and maintenance that these worms need, and you’re off to doubling the breed of your worms in no time. In this case, you’ll no longer have to worry about buying your new stock of worms as these soil creatures are also capable of reproducing quickly (you’ll be able to see newborn worms in more or less 6 weeks). Castings – Priceless and Profitable Just imagine a double in numbers. It will only mean more worms and more opportunities for harvesting worm castings. But did you know that you can also sell your worms as fish bait to fishermen, …

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Using Eggshells in Vermicomposting

Aside from selected organic kitchen scraps and garden wastes, crushed eggshells also play a vital role when it comes to worm composting. Not only can it be used as food for your compost pals, it can also be included as an added material for your worm bins bedding. You can learn a lot more from this versatile ingredient by reading more of this article. Eggshells as food for composting worms Composting worms can absolutely be fed with crushed shells from eggs. You should know that compost worms will eat just about anything that’s organic (all except meat, seafood, poultry, dairy, oily, or spicy stuff). Aside from egg shells, you can also feed them scraps from your kitchen (fruit or vegetable peels, coffee grounds, old and stripped carton boxes, used tea bags) or garden (dried leaves, grass clippings, presoaked peat moss, coconut coir, twigs, barks).   How to apply eggshells inside the worm composting bin Amongst other organic wastes, shells from eggs can be buried in the ground or sprinkled (you can pulverize the shells to make it more finer for sprinkling) on top of the bedding. Make sure that when you crush the shells, egg residue isn’t left over. You can also ensure this by drying it out first before mashing the shells into pieces. Now, if you happen to put in too much fruit scraps inside the bin (which may likely cause the bin to become from acidic later on), you may neutralize the bedding by sprinkling some of …

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Welcome Summer by Revitalizing Your Worms!

Can you feel the warm sun on your face? Are you watching the big, fluffy white clouds track lazily across a deep blue sky? Spring is here and that means the red wiggler worms living in your compost bin may need a little TLC to revitalize them. Clean Up the Mess To make your compost bin a little more livable for your wiggly pals, try to remove any stray sticks or rocks that may have ended up in the bin. These barricades make it difficult for your wigglers to effectively do their job of aerating the compost and can slow down the process. Keep it Humid, but Not Too Humid Good humidity levels in your compost are crucial to keep your worms happy and munching away. The summer can bring dry heat that can make the top layer of your pile dry out and increase the temperatures of the bin beyond the composting temperature of 120 to 150 degrees F. To battle the dry-out and prevent a possible burn-out, move the bin to a shaded area in your yard during the hotter months. If necessary, trickle the hose over the contents to add a bit more hydration. Also, turn the materials a little more frequently to maintain proper moisture levels all through the bin. Bring Friends to the Party As living organisms, there is always a certainty that one day you’ll head to you bin and find a few of your wriggly little buddies has move on to that great …

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How to Vermicompost with Nightcrawler worms

A lot of worm enthusiasts might ask how to vermicompost with nightcrawler worms? Well, there are actually two common types of nightcrawler worms, the European nightcrawlers and the African nightcrawlers. To know more about these two, let’s read on further below. What is Vermicomposting? Well, vermicomposting is actually a natural form of recycling organic wastes. You simply use worms to make this process run its course. These worms then turn these organic scraps into a rich black soil material, which you can later on use to supplement your plants and soil (amongst other benefits). The European Nightcrawler As previously mentioned, there are types of nightcrawler worms, and the

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Types of Nightcrawler Worms

There are many types of nightcrawler worms (also referred to as grunt worms, garden worms, and leaf worms). There’s the European kind, as well as the African and Canadian nightcrawlers. They are the perfect worms for live fish bait; and are a good food source for different kinds of reptiles, amphibians, and birds. But which nightcrawlers are more preferred when it comes to live fish bait, and for vermicomposting? Let’s find out more below. Nightcrawlers and its kinds Raising nightcrawlers is simple. You’ll just have to provide them a worm bin with some earthy soil (and of course some organic food supply), that you can store indoors (in your basement or garage) or outdoors afterwards (on your lawn or garden). Also take note that nightcrawlers have no eyes or ears. They only sense the motion of things through vibrations. They typically burrow down the soil (can burrow as deeps as 6 ½ feet) as soon as they feel minor shudders in their surroundings. But their burrowing has its advantages too since it helps with the aerating of the soil. They’re also sensitive to light that’s why they burrow back under the soil when it’s daylight. Aside from that, they’re usually seen feeding at night, and after a good rain (usually when there’s dew on the grass). They’re also thicker and larger in size (grows as long as 14 inches!) compared to red worms. And as previously mentioned, there are three known kinds of nightcrawlers; and these are the European nightcrawlers …

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Handy Tips for raising worms

Raising worms is easy, and you can even make a hobby out of it. Other than that, several worm breeders also get to make a profit out of selling these as well. There is a big demand for this in organic farming, as earthworm composts have been continuously used as a natural fertilizer for plants and soil. Either used for personal use or for business means, here are a few handy tips when raising these slimy but wonderful creatures. To get you started on your worm breeding project, you must first prepare the following things: a vermicomposting bin, some organic materials (as food supply to your worms), as well as some soil, or sand. Now after you’ve prepared all these, you may now get on with your project. So the first step to this project is deciding what earthworm type to raise. There are a lot of earthworms to choose from, and some of the most well-liked earthworms are the Red Wiggler worms, and the African Night Crawlers. The red wrigglers are usually the worms that are small in size, and is typically the easiest type to breed. The African Night Crawlers on the other hand, are the largest in size; and are usually the ones that are used for catching fish on bait. Moving forward, you can either find these worms on your own or purchase them at a local store near you (you’ll also be able to find some online). You’ll be able to find these being sold …

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