Why Worms Make Great Pets

Disclaimer: This article is meant all in good fun. There are many emotional, practical and entertainment advantages to furry and feathered pets. This article is meant to educate you about composting worms by comparing and contrasting them to furry/feathered pets. Enjoy! Composting worms make great pets because they are no trouble at all. Stocking a worm farm costs less than $50, but pays off in unlimited free compost for your garden. While worms are not fluffy or affectionate, they come with fewer problems than other pets. The average cost of owning a pet like a dog over its lifetime can range from $4000 to $38,000. But worms are relatively cheap to buy. And you generally get a thousand of them at a time. Worms don’t need to be neutered or spayed. And they don’t need any special immunization shots or microchips. Most pets need to be taken to the vet from time to time during their lifetime. And vets charge around $40 per visit. But worms never need a vet visit. And, if part of them gets cut off, sometimes they can even replace the severed part all by themselves. When you first bring a new pet to your home, sometimes they are not completely house-trained. They urinate (or worse) on your nice cream carpet. And they may bring very unpleasant smells to your home. Worms don’t have any of these kinds of problems. They are house-trained and if you give them the right mix of organic and paper wastes, …

Read More

Fishing Worms and Rabbits: A Match Made in Heaven?

If you want to integrate worm farming with your rabbit operation, have a look at the classic, Raising Fishworms with Rabbits, by Howard “Lucky” Mays. First published in 1976, this little manual is two parts valuable instruction and one part personal anecdotes. Mays tells the story of how he got started with rabbits and worms and gives lots of valuable tips on everything from finding rabbit stock to recognizing problems in your worm bin. Mays started out with $5 borrowed from the grocery money, and in the end he has a barn with several hundred rabbits. You might think that many rabbits would stink, but thanks to the composting worms, his barn is odorless, even when closed up for the winter. Worms as a Waste Disposal Solution Gardeners think of rabbit manure as a “cool” manure, and some use it directly on their plants. But manure is not the only waste product your rabbits are generating. There’s also their used nesting material, their urine, and their spilled feed — not to mention the flies that will eventually find their way to this mess. Taken together, you’ve got a hot and stinky waste disposal problem! Proper composting turns that problem into an opportunity. The nitrogen from the urine and the feed combines with the carbon from the bedding and other organic matter, and over time a lovely fertilizer results. This fertilizer can be sold or used on your own plants. Mays takes it one step further and adds worms to the …

Read More

Pet Rabbits – A Worm’s Best Friend

Rabbit droppings are small, relatively dry and don’t contain too much nitrogen, which can spoil plant roots. Although new rabbit manure is considered great plant fertilizer, many rabbit growers choose to put earthworms under their rabbit cages. Why? Rabbit manure along with wasted rabbit feed has been proved to be some of the best food a worm can eat. Also, when properly cared for, earthworms eliminate manure piles, odor, and fly problems all together. For this reason alone, rabbits and worms make a great team. Rabbits are a worm’s best friend. Making Simple Compost with Earthworms To set up your earthworms for an optimal place to feed, you will want to have them underneath your rabbits cage. The best earthworm that I have found is redworms. Ideally, you should have 250-550 worms per square foot. Worms will do a terrific job eliminating the rabbit poop and wasted feed into dark, nutrient-rich, finely textured humus. In addition, keeping worms under the cages allows you to raise worms for fishing bait and worm castings for your garden. This ecosystem that you are creating with worms and rabbits creates a fantastic number of uses for catching fish and feeding gardens – all part of eating organically grown food. Creating a Rabbit and Earthworm Ecosystem Underneath the rabbit hutch you can build a wood frame around the worm bed.  This should be about 12 inches deep. The rabbit hutch should be 3 feet above the ground. A half inch wire mesh floor should be …

Read More

10 Fruits Worms Love To Eat

As a new season of harvest rolls around, fresh peaches, pears, apples and much more will be filling kitchen pantries. It’s a great time of year to make delicious morning smoothies, fresh fruit pies and give your worms a succulent treat! This year, instead of letting all of your fruit trimmings go to waste, start a compost pile with them or give them to your worm farm! Worms are huge fans of fruit, it’s one of their favorite snacks. Any vermicomposter will tell you how much worms just seem to thrive and produce more when fruit is a staple in their diet. Since fruit doesn’t have a very long shelf life and it tends to go bad every now and then, chances are pretty good that you’ll have some spoiled fruit to share with them on a semi-regular basis. So what kind of fruits do worms like in particular? Top 10 Fruits Worms Love To Eat Worms will eat just about anything, but one of their most favorite dishes is organic fruit trimmings. Yes, that’s right – the stuff that usually ends up in your kitchen garbage disposal or in your trash. They’ll gladly take that off your hands, work on it and turn it into valuable compost! The big rule to bear in mind when feeding worms fruit is to avoid fruit with citric acid. Fruits you definitely want to avoid include oranges, lemons, limes, grapefruit and pineapple. Feeding these types of fruits can cause them to try to crawl …

Read More

Where To Find Free Worm Food

Vermicomposting is the best way to get super high quality compost for your indoor plants and garden. It’s completely organic, the results are phenomenal and it saves you from having to buy compost from the store. But you have to feed the worms right? Doesn’t that cost money? You may be surprised to know that you can find a lot of food for your worms for free if you know where to look! Uncle Jim’s Worm Farm is here to help you make cost-effective decisions when it comes to organic gardening and we have some helpful tips on where you can go and what you can do to keep your worms healthy and happy. Where To Find Free Worm Food Depending on where you live, you shouldn’t have to wander far to stumble across loads of great fodder for your worm bin. If you play your cards just right, it’s possible to maintain a worm farm without spending a single dollar on food for your worms! Corrals & Grazing Areas For those living in rural areas, manure of herbivore species such as horses, cows or rabbits is one of the very best things you can feed your worms. There’s a big difference between manure of carnivore species and herbivore so stay away from dog, cat and human manure. Those types of manure will stink up your worm bins and likely cause you to gag every time you check in on your worms. You can find manure from plant-eating animals in …

Read More

How To Catch Or Gather Worms

If you’re a fisherman, then you are in constant need of worms. While running to the local grocery store or gas station is an option, it isn’t always the most convenient or the cheapest! We have some alternative suggestions for you to try. It doesn’t take much time at all and it requires just a few things that you most likely already have laying around the house! You don’t need any special traps, bait or even a permit! If you aren’t a fisherman, no worries, worms are still fun to gather and they serve other purposes too. Cardboard Boxes Method Probably the easiest way to gather earthworms is to simply leave a flattened, wet piece of cardboard out in the yard overnight. This will attract the worms to the surface (for several reasons) and when you remove the cardboard, there will be loads of worms! Rainstorm Method During a rainstorm (or after), go out at dark and use a flashlight to locate nightcrawlers that are out roaming around. Earthworms like to surface when it’s wet out to take advantage of the wet conditions for traveling! Since worms must stay moist to survive, and since they are able to travel easier and farther distances above ground, worms prefer to surface when the sun is down and after a good rain storm. If you aren’t able to find many, use a shovel to dig into the ground. Then use your hands to break apart the wet soil and so that you can …

Read More

Natural Baits For Trout Fishing

If you’ve ever caught a trout, you know why they are so highly sought after. They put up a great fight, they’re beautiful in all of their varieties and they’re great-tasting! Trout can be caught in all kinds of different ways ranging from fly-fishing and lures to bait fishing. What’s the best method to fish for trout? It depends. Sometimes flies are the way to go. Other times, when the weather turns and insects aren’t in season, it’s helpful to have a selection of natural baits on hand to catch the big one. In general, the more natural your fly/lure/bait appears, the more fish you’re likely to catch! Fishing purists tend to gravitate exclusively toward fly-fishing because of the challenge of properly presenting a fly, the thrill of catching fish with custom hand-tied flies and the virtue of catch and release without causing injury to the fish. Additionally, there are many streams and lakes throughout the U.S. that are off-limits for bait fishing. Whatever method you choose, be sure to check with your local fishing regulations to know whether or not bait fishing is allowed. Fishing For Trout With Natural Baits Worms, bait fish, crickets, hellgrammites, nymphs and a whole lot more have been used for ages with a great deal of success. Some of these natural baits can be found near the tributary you are fishing. A good strategy to catch more trout is to examine their environment to find out what they feed on naturally. Do crickets thrive …

Read More

The Role Of Worms In Our Ecosystem

Worms play a critical role in our ecosystem. In fact, it’s argued that worms play the single most important role in our ecosystem. That’s really saying something special about our underground allies. Worms are wonder creatures. They do so many things that help our soils remain clean and fertile. They’re nature’s natural recyclers! Here are a few of the ways that worms help enrich the earth’s soil. They Dig Pathways Worms like to move. If you’ve ever sat and watched one before, that’ll be the first conclusion you draw about them! When worms move through the earth’s soil, they create open pathways that allow air and water to get into the soil and this makes the soil healthy and fertile. Since plants need both oxygen and water, the subterranean pathways or “pores” that worms create allow plant roots to get more oxygen and water, helping them grow healthy and strong. It also helps plant roots to penetrate deeper! They Recycle Waste Worms can eat anywhere from half to their full body weight in food daily. This means they are eating all the time, in fields, in gardens, in pastures, in orchards, you name it. Worms like to eat plant litter like fallen leaves, decomposing fruit and other organic matter. They even like eating decomposing animal dung! They Excrete Compost After a worm eats, it poops. Yeah, so what? Well did you know that worm castings (poop) make the best fertilizer there is? Nothing compares. You can’t buy fertilizer at the store that …

Read More

Best Worms For Bait Fishing

Fishing is all about the details, especially if you have any hopes of landing the big ones. Freshwater worms are probably the most common bait used for fresh water species. Selecting the right worm for bait fishing is a very important component to your success. Fishing is fun, but catching is a lot more fun, which is why you need to be meticulous in your bait preparation. While there is no single worm that takes the cake for all fishing applications, there are a few that serve as staples in the bass, catfish, pan fish and trout fishing communities. Here is a breakdown of what worms are good for what kind of fish and how to use them for best results. Common Night Crawlers These are definitely a staple worm in the fishing community. If you secure a night crawler to a hook with excess worm dangling off the hook, you are certain to draw all sorts of attention to your bait. These things are big, appealing and they wiggle like crazy. Bass fishermen know that largemouth and smallmouth bass will rarely pass up a chance to pounce on a wiggling nightcrawler. Earthworms or night crawlers are also a favorite meal for Walleye. Catfish who roam around the water’s bottom looking for an easy meal are sure to chomp at your night crawler before long. Night crawlers also work well for trout, although many fishermen cut the night crawlers in half to make the meal a little more manageable for …

Read More

How to Order Worms from Uncle Jim’s Worm Farm

James Shaw, founder and owner of Uncle Jims Worm Farm, has been in the industry of worm farming for about four decades now. Uncle Jim’s specializes in breeding and raising Red Wiggler worms (also known as composting worms). But is also in the business of selling other worm species and supplies. A company that is USDA approved (also federally inspected), this reputable vermiculture farm was also featured in the Oprah Winfrey show. Ordering is easy at Uncle Jim’s Worm Farm! Uncle Jim’s worms are guaranteed to be the lowest-priced composting worms being sold on the Internet to date. Other than its affordability, the brand also keeps its old and new customers accustomed to their easy-to-use ordering system. When you order 5000 worms for example, a shopping cart can be accessed below the webpage. From here, you will find a few buttons that will provide you a few more options such as clicking your ‘preferred quantity’. And when you’re done, you can click the Add To Cart button. You will then be redirected to a page that will ask you to choose on ‘Continue Shopping’ or to ‘Proceed to Checkout’. Should you choose the latter, a Checkout form will appear right after. Fill-up the form and then pay your balance. What to expect from Uncle Jim’s packaging When you order from the worm farm, expect your earthworms to get to you in an 8-inch cube corrugated cardboard box. Uncle Jim’s earthworms are always carefully packed inside a breathable cotton bag. Now, …

Read More