How to Store Your Mealworms

Mealworms are an excellent feed for all reptiles, birds, and exotic birds. Their nutritional value and taste make them an ideal feed, as they are routinely desired immediately after the first consumption. But, because mealworms are an holometabolic insect, meaning they have a metamorphosis phase, it may be cumbersome to contain the mealworms in their larva stage. If temperatures are too warm, then the worms can transition into the pupa stage, which then transforms into the darkling beetle phase. And if they transform into the darkling beetle phase, they loose their appeal to the reptiles and birds. If the worms the don’t have enough to eat or enough water, then they can easily die in their habitat. So there are a few more obstacles presented with maintaining mealworms in their larva stage. Keep them refrigerated The simplest solution is keep them in a refrigerator. The mealworms prefer temperatures around 70 degrees, but you don’t. At 70 degrees, this encourages the mealworms to consume rapidly, which then causes them to transition into the darkling beetle. But, if you can refrigerate them, then that will cause them and their hormones to go dormant, ceasing their metamorphosis. It is the equivalent of cryogenic freezing, without the nitrogen. Basically, keeping mealworms in the refrigerator can increase their larva stage by a couple of months. However… There are somethings that the keeper needs to be made aware of regarding the mealworms. Because the mealworms will go dormant, it means that they will go months without …

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Mealworms: The Circle of Life!

You’re probably considering mealworms if you are reading through this article, which isn’t too surprising, considering their nutritional value. They provide a high portion of necessary protein for growing reptiles and birds. They also offer fat and potassium to the scaley consumers, which helps create an internally content pet. And not only beneficial for the pet, but they are typically less messy to handle than red wrigglers or european nightcrawlers. The Egg Stage Mealworms are a result of a holometabolic insect, which means that they must go through a metamorphosis (egg, larva, pupa, adult) throughout their life. And they all begin this process from an egg. The eggs are all but invisible to the naked eye. They are white in color, and can be joined with hundreds of others, as the females release their fertilezed eggs in one location, buried beneath soft bedding. The Larva Stage (mealworms!) After the eggs are laid, they will gestate for about 2 weeks, until the mealworms hatch from the eggs. The mealworms are the results of the larva stage during the metamorphosis, which is simultaneously heralded by many bird and reptile caretakers as ideal animal feed. Because of their high protein content, they are ideal for young reptiles and birds that need calories and fat to meet the demands of a growing body. Mealworms can spend 2 weeks to a full year in the larva stage. The longer a mealworm remains in the larva stage, the larger it will become. Mealworms have an exoskeleton, …

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Can Worms See?

No, red worms do not have eyes. They are very sensitive to bright light. They will try to hide as soon as exposed. Where is the mouth? The worms mouth is in the first anterior segment. There is a small protruding lip just over the mouth, called prostomium. When the worm is foraging, this lip is stretching out. The prostomium is for sensing food. Do they have teeth? Red Worms have no teeth for chewing food. They grind food in their gizzard by muscle action. How do they grind food? Red Worms can only take small particles in their small mouths. Microorganisms soften the food before worms will eat it. Compost Worms have a muscular gizzard. Small parts of food mixed with some grinding material such as sand, topsoil or limestone is ingested. The contractions from the muscles in the gizzard compress those particles against each other, mix it with fluid, and grind it to smaller pieces. If a worm is cut in two, will it grow back? It depends on where the cut took place. If a worm is cut at the posterior end, sometimes a new tail will grow back on. Sometimes a second tail will appear next to a damaged tail. However, the posterior half of the worm can not grow a new anterior (head.) What Are The Other Critters In My Composting Worm Bin? What Are The Other Critters In My Worm Bin? Once your composting worm bin has been going for a while, you may …

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