Tips on Harvesting Worm Castings

For some worm composters, harvesting worm castings can be a very tasking thing to do. You’re going to have to try your hand at separating the castings from the worms, at a thorough manner. But then again, a lot of worm bins make harvesting easier to do, but there are also some that aren’t as conducive. You’ll know that your worm bin has been filled-up with castings as soon as you see rich, earthy soil stuff in it. It’s also easier to harvest these worm castings if you have those stackable units at home. You’ll only have to take out the bottom tray, and empty it afterwards (you can store the castings inside another container). But if you want to try other common approaches to harvesting worm poop, then you can try the following tips: Tip 1: Since red wiggler worms are sensitive to light, you can separate them from their castings by simply shunning some light on them (you can probably use a lamp or flashlight for this); and they will instantly burrow back into the bottom part of the soil. So, as soon as the worms disappear, you can then scan through some worm manure that has been casted aside. Scoop from the top pile all the way to the bottom, using either a shovel or your hands. And if you happen to scoop in some worms, you can just put them back right in their bin. Plus, you won’t have to worry about the smell or the …

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Basic Facts and Advantages of Composting

There are many facts and advantages of composting that can be made very useful. But other than that, you should know that there are also different kinds of composting. There’s anaerobic, aerobic, and vermicomposting. You can use any of these processes when composting. You can even put into practice some home composting if you want; and all you’ll need is some organic wastes, composting bins, or just a compost pile, neatly placed in your garden or lawn. Composting makes good use of organic scraps that are usually just thrown into the trash bins. You should know that organic materials that are in the form of kitchen scraps and garden wastes can still be converted into other useful produce. It not only also helps minimize landfill accumulation, it also provides a home for earthworms (helps in aerating and loosening the soil) and other beneficial organisms. Other than that, making compost is easy and inexpensive. You’ll only need resources for compost that you can easily find at home (as previously mentioned, kitchen and garden wastes). Also, you’ll need air and moisture (for both aerobic and worm composting) to be present in the composting bin or compost heap, as well as some red worms for composting. But if you want to put in days old animal manure, then you can find these from local farms for free; much like the coffee grounds that are also being given by local shops, for no extra charge. By-products that have been created from your compost, can …

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Types of Composting

Composting has always been a good method of recycling. It not only helps breakdown decomposing organic materials (like food scraps from the kitchen, days old animal manure, grass clippings, dried leaves, and more), it also helps enhance the life of the ecosystem by making good use of its by-products. There are also three main types of composting. You’ll just have to pick which one will work better for your garden or lawn. But whether you choose one from the other, it’ll still be a good choice, as composting is eco-friendly and very cost-effective. The first kind of composting is aerobic composting. In this process, air is used to compost organic materials. You can use organic scraps that are high in nitrogen, which are usually your ‘greens’. Anyway, bacteria that is produced from wastes that have a high nitrogen content, will be the ones to generate high temperatures; and these temperatures can go as high as 160 degrees. Take note that this composting method requires much needed attention. You’ll have to turn the compost every few days or so, so that the air and temperature in your compost will rise. It should also be kept moist at all times. The decomposing process for this type is fast and usually doesn’t cause any odors. The second kind of composting is anaerobic composting. Now this is the opposite of aerobic, as it composts without having to use air. It also doesn’t require much attention, as you’ll only have to leave your organic wastes …

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Worm Composting with Red Wiggler worms

The best earthworm species for worm composting (also known as vermicomposting) are red wiggler worms. When compared to ordinary organic composting, worm composting is better because the worms used in this type of process gets to produce more. Its by-products are nutrient-filled; and is basically a hassle-free and an eco-friendly way for recycling organic wastes. Either way, you can compost with these fascinating red worms indoors or outdoors (paves the way for a year round of composting). And just like any living thing that seeks a comfortable place to live in, Red Wiggler worms are also in need of the same thing. So before placing your compost pals in your composting bin, you should be able to prepare their bedding first. A worm bedding is usually a pile of organic materials that the worms stay and thrive in. So start by gathering materials, and then mixing all these together. These organic materials can be in the form of dried leaves, some pre-soaked and shredded newspaper or cardboard, some shredded straw, some dried clippings of grass, and some days old animal manure (don’t use pet manure for this). Your worms will also eat the materials inside the bin. So what you can further do is to put in a few more organic wastes like fruit and vegetable peels, some broken egg shells, and coffee grounds. Also, put in two handfuls of soil or sand. These materials will help provide that much needed grit for the worms to be able to digest …

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