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How to Break Compost Down Quickly

Many people explore composting as a great way to naturally dispose of food scraps. As a bonus, they get prime quality organic fertilizer in return. There are two main types of composting: hot composting and vermicomposting with worms. What are the differences? How are they similar? Which type is fastest? Composting Overview Hot composting is done outdoors, mostly in a rural environment. It is usually done in pits or bins away from any structures. On the other hand, you can have your vermicomposting bins both inside and outside whether you live in an apartment or in house. Bins can be placed in kitchens, closets, garages or on porches or anywhere outside where there are awnings. Vermicomposting bins come in an array of sizes, but 3′ by 3′ is highly recommended. This is the optimal size where the bin center heats to the right temperature for microbes to flourish while allowing maximum airflow.

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Great Gift Ideas From Uncle Jim’s Worm Farm

Are you looking for a unique gift that keeps giving the whole year ’round? Vermicomposting gifts from Uncle Jim’s Worm Farm are perfect for almost anyone! Vermicomposting means composting with worms. This speedy, low-odor method of composting turns trash into valuable compost. The compost helps plants grow strong. Composting is great for kids, families of any size, and singles. It reduces waste, which helps the environment. And vermicomposting only needs a small space, indoors or outdoors. Let’s see how Uncle Jim’s Worm Farm can answer some of your gift-giving needs. Who Can Compost with Worms The ideal gift recipient cooks food at home. Take-out food can be composted, but not if it is greasy. Also, vermicomposting is not suitable for a home that is mostly unoccupied. The worms can be left during a vacation, but not for a household that is often out-of-town.

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Adding a Worm Blanket to Your Vermicomposting Bin

Whether your vermicomposting bin is situated indoors or outdoors, you should consider adding a worm blanket. Even though most bins are already equipped with a lid, a worm blanket comes in handy. It helps maintain moisture, protects your worms from the elements, and keeps the bin dark. This article will help clarify any questions you may have about coverings. What is the Purpose of the Lid on a Vermicomposting Bin? Whether your vermicomposting bin is indoors or outdoors, you usually need a lid. Lids for indoor bins serve many functions: Isolate odors from within Deter insects such as fruit flies Discourages dogs from foraging in the bin Retains moisture Helps regulate the internal bin and bedding temperature Keeps the worm bin dark, which is the way worms like it

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Worm Composting Odors: How to Keep Your Vermicomposting Bin Smelling Sweet

Seasoned vermicomposter enthusiasts know that when they smell a bad odor coming from their composting bins, something is out of balance. A healthy composting bin and the worms inside should have an earthy smell. The avid vermicomposter enthusiast also knows that whatever produces that horrible smell can be easily remedied. Before taking action, we need to identify the common causes underlying this stinky situation as described below: What Are You Feeding Your Worms? Did someone in your family accidentally slip oil, sauces, meat, bones, gristle, or dairy into the kitchen scraps? Foods of that nature can easily become rancid. Please avoid placing these scraps into the composting bin. Broccoli, cabbage, and even banana peels are also famous for causing a stench, especially if you compost indoors. If the smell from cruciferous vegetables bothers you, cut them into small pieces, and place sparingly into the bin. Avoid acidic foods, e.g., tomatoes, citrus, and pineapples, because they throw off the pH balance and can get your worms ill.

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What is Hot Composting Versus Vermicomposting

Many vermicomposting enthusiasts know about a technique to break down organic waste to produce fertilizer without using worms: hot composting. Although both produce organic fertilizer, there are many differences. The type of bin, location of the bin, setup, and day-to-day feedings are not the same. Also, the resulting organic fertilizer from worms is different than from hot composting. First, let’s explore hot composting, especially for those individuals unfamiliar with this method.

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Top Five Best Foods for Composting Worms

Vermicomposting enthusiasts agree overall on what to feed their worms. In this article, we add our subjective twist as to the top five best foods to make your worms thrive. You want to keep your worms happy and healthy so they can produce lots of natural, organic fertilizer. People who cultivate lawns, shrubs, and flowers love the “black gold” fertilizer from vermicomposting. Before we list the top five best foods, we need to list the WORST foods.

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How to Prepare Your Outdoor Vermicomposting Bin for the Colder Weather

Now that the summer season is coming to a close, it’s time to prepare your outdoor vermicomposting bin for fall and winter. Despite the cold weather, you can continue composting and accumulating free natural organic fertilizer. Do you live in a warmer environment? If the temperature rarely drops below 57°F, your composting worms will slow down in wintertime, but they are not likely to die. For those who live in a colder climate, your worms will probably die should you not take the following preventive actions: The Easiest Solution – Bring a Vermicomposting Bin Indoors The best way to protect your worms from the ravages of freezing winter temperatures is to move them indoors. We offer several tray-based composters for both indoor and outdoor composting. Place the bin in a heated garage or basement so your worms can survive the cold. You can also put it in the kitchen or in a closet. In this way, the bin is close enough to add your food scraps rather than going outside in inclement weather. Don’t worry about flies, pests, odor, and mold. This only occurs should you not take care of your worms. Click to read articles about indoor vermicomposting bins.

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Grow Your Own Live Worms for Fishing Bait

Are you a live worm fishing enthusiast and want to raise your own bait? You can easily grow fishing worms at home. In fact, you can solve another problem at the same time: household trash odor. Fishing worms can eat your kitchen scraps. No more holding your nose on trash day! Composting worms are easy to set up and maintain. A worm bin offers a ready supply of juicy, fresh worms. They renew themselves, so you don’t have to run to the bait shop anymore. Save money, save time, and save trash hassles!

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Is My Vermicomposting Bin Too Wet? What to Do?

When the smell coming from your vermicomposting bin is horrible, you know that something is wrong. With dread, your worst fears are realized when you look inside: the bin is wet. That does not bode well. Moisture levels are critical for your composting worms’ health. If it’s too wet inside, your worms can get sick. They can even drown. What should you do? Assess the Situation As a vermicomposting enthusiast, you are responsible for your worms’ well-being and their environment. You need to check their bedding’s moisture content regularly.

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How to Keep Your Composting Worms Cool in the Hot Summer

In the hot summer weather, your composting worms are at risk of getting overheated and dried out. They may even die. That’s because worms are unable to sweat. Outdoors in nature, worms beat the heat by burrowing deep into the soil. But your composting worms don’t have that option. They live in an artificial environment, the composting bin. As a master of their universe, you must ensure they stay healthy. This article is a guide as to how to prevent your worms from suffering in the summer heat.

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