Worm Composting Odors: How to Keep Your Vermicomposting Bin Smelling Sweet

Seasoned vermicomposter enthusiasts know that when they smell a bad odor coming from their composting bins, something is out of balance. A healthy composting bin and the worms inside should have an earthy smell. The avid vermicomposter enthusiast also knows that whatever produces that horrible smell can be easily remedied. Before taking action, we need to identify the common causes underlying this stinky situation as described below: What Are You Feeding Your Worms? Did someone in your family accidentally slip oil, sauces, meat, bones, gristle, or dairy into the kitchen scraps? Foods of that nature can easily become rancid. Please avoid placing these scraps into the composting bin. Broccoli, cabbage, and even banana peels are also famous for causing a stench, especially if you compost indoors. If the smell from cruciferous vegetables bothers you, cut them into small pieces, and place sparingly into the bin. Avoid acidic foods, e.g., tomatoes, citrus, and pineapples, because they throw off the pH balance and can get your worms ill.

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What is Hot Composting Versus Vermicomposting

Many vermicomposting enthusiasts know about a technique to break down organic waste to produce fertilizer without using worms: hot composting. Although both produce organic fertilizer, there are many differences. The type of bin, location of the bin, setup, and day-to-day feedings are not the same. Also, the resulting organic fertilizer from worms is different than from hot composting. First, let’s explore hot composting, especially for those individuals unfamiliar with this method.

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