What is the Reproductive Cycle of a Composting Red Worm?

One key to red worms’ reputation as superb composting worms is their ability to reproduce. A composting bin stocked with a couple of pounds of red worms can go a very long time without needing more worms added. If the worms are properly fed and cared for, they will make baby worms. What is the red worm’s reproductive cycle? Under what conditions will red worms reproduce? Red Worm Reproduction Red worms are hermaphrodites. They have reproductive organs that are both male and female. However, red worms cannot reproduce on their own. Jellyfish, flatworms, sea anemones, certain types of sharks, boa constrictors, certain insects, some rare reptiles, and chickens and turkeys are capable of reproduction without a mate. Worms need

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Composting Kitchen Surpluses: Eggshells, Coffee Grounds, and Orange Peels

At Uncle Jim’s Worm Farm, we get questions about how to compost three common kitchen scraps: eggshells, coffee grounds, and orange peels. These are all popular foods and beverages. On average, we consume approximately 1 egg and 2 cups of coffee per day. That’s a lot of scraps! Fortunately, composting worms can take the burden off landfills and incinerators. These and many other kitchen scraps can be turned into free fertilizer by composting them with worms. Composting can be successful at any scale. Single apartment dwellers, large families, restaurants, coffee shops and even institutions can compost unwanted organic materials. If you don’t already have a composting program

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What do to with Kitchen Scraps: Reduce, Compost, and Re-Grow

Your kitchen trash has a significant amount of organic material. Much of this is compostable. Hauling organic matter off for landfill internment or incineration is a huge waste of energy and potential. Can kitchen scraps be re-grown into new food plants easily? What can you do to reduce the production of kitchen scraps and wasted food? Can composting help? Re-Grow Plants You can save money and perpetuate the chain of life by re-growing plants. Cutting vegetables in a certain way and cultivating the clippings results in new baby plants. These can be eaten and they are free. Chop the bottom off celery and place in a bowl with a small amount of warm water. Place in direct sunlight. When the leaves start to thicken and grow on the base, transplant to the soil in your garden, greenhouse or container. Left-over whole lettuce, cabbage and Bok Choy leaves can be placed in a bowl with a very small amount of water in the bottom. Place in sunlight. Mist the leaves with water every other day. In three to four days, roots will appear. Plant in the soil.

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