Wake Up Your Vermicomposting Bin in the Spring

Mother Nature is waking up and warming up. The spring sun is bestowing new life and vigor. It’s time to check inside your composter to see how your worms are doing. They get slow and sleepy in the cold, but now, they are hard at work eating food scraps and churning out worm castings, a super-nutritious component of finished compost that helps your plants grow like crazy. During the winter, in the cold, sluggish months when the worms were sleeping, your composter may have gotten filled up with scraps. These scraps will begin to disappear into compost as everything warms up. Adding a bag or two of extra red wiggler worms can help move those scraps along so you have plenty of rich compost to add to your garden. The best worms for composting are red wigglers. They don’t need a lot of depth to be happy. They tolerate a wider temperature range than other worms, and they stay put in the composter, unlike some worm types that have the tendency to spontaneously migrate.

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Springtime at the Worm Bin

With temperatures rising and spring in the air, you may be looking forward to harvesting some of the contents of your worm bin. Worm castings are perfect for giving new plants a great start, but how do you separate those hard-working worms from their castings? Well, if you have a multi-level worm bin and have been adding new food scraps to the top bin, then you’ll find the most castings–and the fewest worms–in the bottom bin. But what if your worm bin doesn’t have more than one level? Well, there are several ways you can sort your red wigglers from their castings. Sorting Worms With Food Sorting with food is one of the slowest methods, but also one of the easiest. To sort with food, you simply feed your red wigglers in one corner of the bin for a few weeks. Over time, the worms will congregate around their food source and then you can harvest castings from elsewhere in the bin. Place new bedding in the empty part of the bin or spread out the remaining castings and worms, and you’re ready to go. If you don’t want to wait for the worms to gravitate to their food, then you can use light to sort your worms. Sorting Worms With Light Sorting with light is faster than sorting with food, but it does take some consistent attention. Worms will naturally move away from light, but too much light can cause your worms to dry out. To use the volcano …

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Composting Worms Species Disclaimer

We cannot guarantee a 100% pure species of any type composting worms. Our worms are harvested from worm beds that are decades old and may depending of time of year contain several different compost worm species. Not to worry!  Bed run worms are superior because they work all layers of the compost not just the top few inches. Giving you a better compost faster. This also gives an advantage in that as conditions change certain species will multiply as conditions become unfavorable for another keeping you with a constantly healthy composter.  Because they are bed run some orders may have more than one species than another but rest assured their populations will naturally adjust to the needs of your waste. Because of the adaptive nature of worms some varieties reproductive rates change with warmer weather, colder weather, moisture levels, soil content etc. Different species of Worms perform distinct jobs. Some will burrow horizontally, while others will burrow vertically, some to a depth of twelve feet. Aporrectodea caliginosa – the common pasture earthworm Dendrobaena veneta – the European night crawler Amynrthus Gracilus – Alabama Jumper Eisenia fetida – the manure worm. Perionyx excavatus – The blue worm. Eisenia Andrei – the Red Tiger worm Lumbricus terrestris – the common night crawler or dew worm. Lumbricus rubellus* – the red marsh worm. Commonly found in places rich in organic matter and moisture such as gardens and pastures. The reproductive habits of different species of earthworms will vary. For example, the Aporrectodea caliginos …

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