Where Should I Put My Worm Bin?

Here at Uncle Jim’s Worm Farm, we often hear the question “Where should I put my worm bin?” Your bin’s location in or outside your home can make a huge difference to your worms’ health and happiness. By adjusting the placement of your bin based on your climate, season, and other home conditions, you can ensure that your worms will love where they live! Outdoor Bins Many people prefer to keep their red wiggler worm bins outdoors in the yard or in the vicinity of the house. This usually provides more space and moves any unwanted odor or mess away from your living space. But outdoor temperatures and conditions can be highly variable and unpredictable. Just follow these few guidelines when choosing where to place your bin outdoors. Convenience. It’s common sense, but you’ll want your worm bin to be placed somewhere that’s convenient for you to check on regularly! This should be a part of your yard, shed, or patio that has plenty of accessible space for feeding, care, and cleanup. Your regular checkup is the most important consideration. However, your worm bin should be a distance from the home to avoid attracting pests indoors. Access to Water & Air. Remember that worms need dechlorinated water and that the bin may become dry faster when it’s placed outdoors in warmer months. For this reason, it’s important to place the bin close to your safe water, with adequate drainage and air holes. If you’ve got your bin in a closed shed …

Read More

Why Worms Make Great Pets

Disclaimer: This article is meant all in good fun. There are many emotional, practical and entertainment advantages to furry and feathered pets. This article is meant to educate you about composting worms by comparing and contrasting them to furry/feathered pets. Enjoy! Composting worms make great pets because they are no trouble at all. Stocking a worm farm costs less than $50, but pays off in unlimited free compost for your garden. While worms are not fluffy or affectionate, they come with fewer problems than other pets. The average cost of owning a pet like a dog over its lifetime can range from $4000 to $38,000. But worms are relatively cheap to buy. And you generally get a thousand of them at a time. Worms don’t need to be neutered or spayed. And they don’t need any special immunization shots or microchips. Most pets need to be taken to the vet from time to time during their lifetime. And vets charge around $40 per visit. But worms never need a vet visit. And, if part of them gets cut off, sometimes they can even replace the severed part all by themselves. When you first bring a new pet to your home, sometimes they are not completely house-trained. They urinate (or worse) on your nice cream carpet. And they may bring very unpleasant smells to your home. Worms don’t have any of these kinds of problems. They are house-trained and if you give them the right mix of organic and paper wastes, …

Read More

How are Worm Tea and Worm Leachate Different?

One question we hear quite often at Uncle Jim’s Worm Farm is, “What should I do with the liquid that drains off my worm bin? Is that worm tea?” First off, properly speaking, the liquid that drains from the spigot is not worm tea, although some people do call it that. The liquid that drains from the bottom of a worm bin is more accurately called worm leachate or worm seepage. The spigot that lets the worm leachate drain is a valuable safety valve. If you leave it open, you’ll know pretty quickly if your worm bin is getting too wet because you’ll see brown liquid seeping out. It’s important to know if your worm bin gets too wet because the material in an overly wet worm bin tends to get compact and that means air can’t get in. When no air gets in, the material goes “anaerobic” (meaning “without oxygen”). There are three reasons you don’t want your worm bin to get too wet and go anaerobic: Anaerobic decomposition stinks — nobody likes a stinky worm bin. Worms need to breathe — anaerobic conditions can kill your worms, and Anaerobic bacteria are generally bad for your plants. Since worm seepage only happens when your worm bin is too wet, and overly wet conditions lead to the production of bad bacteria, there is a good chance that the draining liquid will not benefit your plants. What to Do With Extra Liquid So what do you do with the worm leachate …

Read More