What To Not Feed Worms

If you’re looking for another reason to eat fresh and eat healthy, this may be it! Worms can eat pretty much any organic matter that was once living, which encompasses a lot of healthy food such as fruits, vegetables and grains! That’s a pretty good incentive to buy fruits and vegetables more often. Not only is it great for your health, it provides food for your small wiggly friends as well. One small problem some people run into is not having the appropriate food for their worms and trying to feed them food scraps on the non-approved list! If your eating habits include more processed food than organic food, then you may find some difficulty in coming up with enough organic matter to feed your red worms. We’d be talking about meats, dairy foods and processed foods of epic proportions here and an almost utter absence of fruits and veggies, so you probably don’t fall into this category! Perhaps the household in which a worm farm would thrive the most and find the greatest abundance of food is one that is vegetarian! This isn’t to say that people should avoid meats or dairy, or yummy desserts for that matter, but worms love organic food scraps so it’s always good to have a little on hand, and most people do. The more fresh fruits and veggies scraps you’re able to feed your worms, the better. Otherwise, your worms will have to settle for a steady diet of coffee grounds, dead flowers, …

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Composting Worm Reproduction: How Worms Reproduce

Healthy composting systems are home to some of the most prolific breeders around: the Red Wiggler. Knowing a little bit about how they mate and what the ideal mating environment is like will help you harvest more compost. Did you know that under favorable conditions, mature red worms can produce two to three cocoons per week? That’s a lot of baby worms, considering each cocoon will yield anywhere from 3-20 juvenile worms! If you want long-lasting sustainability, it’s important to keep your red wigglers comfortable and happy to encourage more reproduction. Let’s dive into how worms reproduce and what that can do for your vermicomposting system. How Red Wigglers Reproduce Most people already know that worms are hermaphrodites. This means that they have both male and female reproductive organs. However, they cannot reproduce alone. They must pair with another worm for successful reproduction to occur. When two worms mate, they join and begin secreting mucus to create a mucus ring around them. After a few hours the worms separate and lay eggs and fertilize the inside of the cocoon. The worms back out of the cocoon and it seals itself off, leaving an oval-shaped cocoon that hardens over time to protect the young hatchlings inside. After 11 weeks, the hatchlings emerge from the cocoon! Worms can’t reproduce just any time. Their bodies undergo changes as they grow older, and at around 90 days old they become old enough to mate. When a red worm reaches maturity, a bulbous gland appears about …

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How To Catch Or Gather Worms

If you’re a fisherman, then you are in constant need of worms. While running to the local grocery store or gas station is an option, it isn’t always the most convenient or the cheapest! We have some alternative suggestions for you to try. It doesn’t take much time at all and it requires just a few things that you most likely already have laying around the house! You don’t need any special traps, bait or even a permit! If you aren’t a fisherman, no worries, worms are still fun to gather and they serve other purposes too. Cardboard Boxes Method Probably the easiest way to gather earthworms is to simply leave a flattened, wet piece of cardboard out in the yard overnight. This will attract the worms to the surface (for several reasons) and when you remove the cardboard, there will be loads of worms! Rainstorm Method During a rainstorm (or after), go out at dark and use a flashlight to locate nightcrawlers that are out roaming around. Earthworms like to surface when it’s wet out to take advantage of the wet conditions for traveling! Since worms must stay moist to survive, and since they are able to travel easier and farther distances above ground, worms prefer to surface when the sun is down and after a good rain storm. If you aren’t able to find many, use a shovel to dig into the ground. Then use your hands to break apart the wet soil and so that you can …

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Natural Baits For Trout Fishing

If you’ve ever caught a trout, you know why they are so highly sought after. They put up a great fight, they’re beautiful in all of their varieties and they’re great-tasting! Trout can be caught in all kinds of different ways ranging from fly-fishing and lures to bait fishing. What’s the best method to fish for trout? It depends. Sometimes flies are the way to go. Other times, when the weather turns and insects aren’t in season, it’s helpful to have a selection of natural baits on hand to catch the big one. In general, the more natural your fly/lure/bait appears, the more fish you’re likely to catch! Fishing purists tend to gravitate exclusively toward fly-fishing because of the challenge of properly presenting a fly, the thrill of catching fish with custom hand-tied flies and the virtue of catch and release without causing injury to the fish. Additionally, there are many streams and lakes throughout the U.S. that are off-limits for bait fishing. Whatever method you choose, be sure to check with your local fishing regulations to know whether or not bait fishing is allowed. Fishing For Trout With Natural Baits Worms, bait fish, crickets, hellgrammites, nymphs and a whole lot more have been used for ages with a great deal of success. Some of these natural baits can be found near the tributary you are fishing. A good strategy to catch more trout is to examine their environment to find out what they feed on naturally. Do crickets thrive …

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