Get Your Worms Ready For The Cold Now

Cooler weather is starting to head our way and now is the time to start thinking about winterizing your outdoor composting worms. Our red wigglers are a hearty breed. They are fairly tolerant of colder temperatures, but they have their limits. Super Reds (European Night Crawlers) are a bit more cold hardy. If you live in an area of the country that gets cool in the winter, read these tips for protecting your worm friends: Be ready before the temperature drops below 57 degrees Fahrenheit. At 57 degrees, worms start to feel the cold. Decide in advance what you are going to do because you may need some materials (read on). Use a composter thermometer. If the bin gets too hot or too cold, you can take action before things go awry. Don’t depend on natural heat. Worms will seek out warm spots in the composter. The process of decomposition generates some heat, but you can’t depend on this through a cold winter. So you should: Insulate. Lay hay bales around the composter. Bed down the composter with hay, straw or cow manure for insulation. Or you can put wet newspaper in the bedding, and add dry newspaper on top of that. Move the composter to shelter. If your composter is portable, we recommend you move it into a garage or basement. Feed pre-chewed food. The worms slow down in the cold. Make your worms’ job easier by providing smaller amounts of scraps at a time. Cut the food scraps …

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How To Compost The Right Way

In the amazing world of composting, there are numerous different methods that work for people. What method you decide on ultimately comes down to time, space, resources and personal preference. Let’s take a minute and break down a few of the more popular composting methods used today. Hopefully this will help you decide on a method that will work well for you, your place of living and your environment. Bear in mind that each method is different and has its own unique qualities. Uncle Jim’s Worm Farm is all about vermicomposting so we’ll go ahead and save that one for last! Leaf Mold Composting Year after year, leaves fall from the trees and settle on the ground to become a natural fertilizer. It’s free compost for whoever wants it, which is probably the greatest benefit of this system. However, leaf composting requires more time and space than the other methods.  You have to pile up a big old pile of fallen leaves and leave them to rot. Now, it requires very little care and attention after this point – which is good. However, the end result (leaf mold) is inferior to regular compost so if you’re after high quality compost, this one may not be for you. Humanure Composting Huma-what? Yes there is such a thing as composting human waste. While this method only requires minimal space, time and effort, it’s might gross you out a little. It begins with adding urine to regular compost and working your way to …

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Worm Castings – How Black Gold Helps Plants Grow

Worm castings is just a fancy way of saying worm poop. Uncle Jim’s Worm Farm likes to refer to it as “black gold”, because it really is priceless stuff. Organic black gold produced by red wigglers outperforms chemical fertilization every time. Not only is it priceless, but it is also profitable! It is so valuable and nutritional for gardening and crop growing that you can find people to buy from you fairly easily. Why It Works So Well First, black gold, when done right, does not stink. So don’t be afraid to get your hands right in it. The reason it doesn’t stink is because it has been reprocessed by the worms multiple times, being broken down into stable or neutral states. The reason our “black gold” works so well because it greatly enhances soil fertility. In turn, it enables plants to absorb more nutrients in the soil, growing faster and healthier than they would with normal top soil. If you want to grow that monster pumpkin or those sizable cucumbers, using organic fertilizer will help you more than anything else. Throughout the life of a plant, it goes through many phases. One of these phases is chemical synthesis. Plants, just like humans, need nutrients in order to summon the energy to complete cycles. Worm castings operate like a pit crew during a NASCAR race. Red wigglers are some of the best known vermicomposters. They do all the hard work of eating and digesting your discarded food scraps and other appropriate waste. …

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Red Worms For Composting

Not to be silly, but have you ever thought of poop as priceless? Welcome to the wonderful world of vermicomposting. Meet Mr. Red Wiggler – the best natural composter we know. He works tirelessly scouring for organic matter to eat and digest, which results in nutrient-rich castings that are very beneficial to plants. These castings are referred to as “black gold” by Uncle Jim. It’s the very best form of fertilizer or compost known to plants! Getting Started Uncle Jim’s Worm Farm offers everything you need to start a home vermiculture system, including our famous Red Wigglers who are guaranteed to arrive healthy and ready to gobble up your food waste. Here’s a basic list of what you’ll need to start composting with red worms: Shallow box or container – your box system doesn’t need to be deep because worms like to feed in the uppermost layers of bedding. You can build your own container/box with wood pallets or you can order one specifically designed for red worm composting. Bedding – the material used for bedding is important because it has to be able to retain moisture. Worms require moisture so that they can breathe. Suitable materials include cardboard, shredded newspaper, fallen leaves, manure, or peat moss. Soaking new bedding overnight in water brings good results. Just remember the saying, “if it’s dry, they will die.” Worms also need a little bit of soil in their bedding so that they can use it to break down food in their gizzard. Red …

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