Best Worms For Bait Fishing

Fishing is all about the details, especially if you have any hopes of landing the big ones. Freshwater worms are probably the most common bait used for fresh water species. Selecting the right worm for bait fishing is a very important component to your success. Fishing is fun, but catching is a lot more fun, which is why you need to be meticulous in your bait preparation. While there is no single worm that takes the cake for all fishing applications, there are a few that serve as staples in the bass, catfish, pan fish and trout fishing communities. Here is a breakdown of what worms are good for what kind of fish and how to use them for best results. Common Night Crawlers These are definitely a staple worm in the fishing community. If you secure a night crawler to a hook with excess worm dangling off the hook, you are certain to draw all sorts of attention to your bait. These things are big, appealing and they wiggle like crazy. Bass fishermen know that largemouth and smallmouth bass will rarely pass up a chance to pounce on a wiggling nightcrawler. Earthworms or night crawlers are also a favorite meal for Walleye. Catfish who roam around the water’s bottom looking for an easy meal are sure to chomp at your night crawler before long. Night crawlers also work well for trout, although many fishermen cut the night crawlers in half to make the meal a little more manageable for …

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Benefits of mealworm feeding

The benefits of mealworms are undeniable. They are high in protein, making an excellent feed for your favorite, neighborly blue birds, or serving the appetites of those exotic reptiles that lounge by the heat rock in their terrarium. Mealworms are easy to find, as most pet stores will offer them, or you can order mealworms directly from Uncle Jim’s Worm Farm, where they are they come with a live delivery guarantee. Although bearing such great benefits and easy discovery, mealworms can often present a puzzling dilemma upon receival, as most people are unaware of how exactly to feed their mealworms. Well the solution is simple. To begin, we recommend following the instructions from our previous post to set up your mealworms’ habitat. But to briefly reiterate, simply obtain a plastic container about the size of a shoe box. You’ll want to use some type of high protein grain (we believe you and your mealworms will get the best results from wheat bran). Fill the container about half way full. You’ll want to leave room at the top, making it more difficult for the mealworms to escape. And there you go, as simple as inseminating a box with wheat bran! But that will only serve as a start. And like anything that relies on your attention and nursing to keep it alive, the mealworms will require some additional care throughout this exciting mealworm journey. A routine questions that congregates with mealworms is “how to feed them?” Well, basically, the mealworms are …

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How to Store Your Mealworms

Mealworms are an excellent feed for all reptiles, birds, and exotic birds. Their nutritional value and taste make them an ideal feed, as they are routinely desired immediately after the first consumption. But, because mealworms are an holometabolic insect, meaning they have a metamorphosis phase, it may be cumbersome to contain the mealworms in their larva stage. If temperatures are too warm, then the worms can transition into the pupa stage, which then transforms into the darkling beetle phase. And if they transform into the darkling beetle phase, they loose their appeal to the reptiles and birds. If the worms the don’t have enough to eat or enough water, then they can easily die in their habitat. So there are a few more obstacles presented with maintaining mealworms in their larva stage. Keep them refrigerated The simplest solution is keep them in a refrigerator. The mealworms prefer temperatures around 70 degrees, but you don’t. At 70 degrees, this encourages the mealworms to consume rapidly, which then causes them to transition into the darkling beetle. But, if you can refrigerate them, then that will cause them and their hormones to go dormant, ceasing their metamorphosis. It is the equivalent of cryogenic freezing, without the nitrogen. Basically, keeping mealworms in the refrigerator can increase their larva stage by a couple of months. However… There are somethings that the keeper needs to be made aware of regarding the mealworms. Because the mealworms will go dormant, it means that they will go months without …

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Mealworms: The Circle of Life!

You’re probably considering mealworms if you are reading through this article, which isn’t too surprising, considering their nutritional value. They provide a high portion of necessary protein for growing reptiles and birds. They also offer fat and potassium to the scaley consumers, which helps create an internally content pet. And not only beneficial for the pet, but they are typically less messy to handle than red wrigglers or european nightcrawlers. The Egg Stage Mealworms are a result of a holometabolic insect, which means that they must go through a metamorphosis (egg, larva, pupa, adult) throughout their life. And they all begin this process from an egg. The eggs are all but invisible to the naked eye. They are white in color, and can be joined with hundreds of others, as the females release their fertilezed eggs in one location, buried beneath soft bedding. The Larva Stage (mealworms!) After the eggs are laid, they will gestate for about 2 weeks, until the mealworms hatch from the eggs. The mealworms are the results of the larva stage during the metamorphosis, which is simultaneously heralded by many bird and reptile caretakers as ideal animal feed. Because of their high protein content, they are ideal for young reptiles and birds that need calories and fat to meet the demands of a growing body. Mealworms can spend 2 weeks to a full year in the larva stage. The longer a mealworm remains in the larva stage, the larger it will become. Mealworms have an exoskeleton, …

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