Using red wiggler worms for making fertilizer

If you’re looking for a quick return of investment, then you should try getting into vermicomposting. Composting with worms not only is good option for recycling decomposing natural wastes, it can also serve as a great opportunity to put up a business venture. Red wiggler worms can be sold as is, as well as make a profit out of selling their nutrient-rich castings. You can learn more about worm compost production by reading more from this article.   Raising and breeding red wigglers for compost production Before you can even harvest any of these valuable red worms castings, you must first keep them in a comfortable home (one that closely resembles their real habitat). A worm habitat can be in the form of a compost bin. One that’s already been drilled with ventilation and drainage holes around it (ample amounts of oxygen is needed for these worms and other beneficial microbes to survive). Aside from that, providing your compost worms a nice bedding to set themselves in is also an essential. Make sure that the bedding materials are organic and moist as worms also eat off of these. Of course, food is also a necessity for these worms (best if these were served in tiny cut pieces and buried into the bedding), as well as placing them in a good location (the ideal location to place them in would be in an area where there’s room temperature – extreme temperatures can kill them). Worm castings composition Typically, the Eisenia Foetida …

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Lawn Care: How often can you spray your lawn with worm tea?

Worm tea like most fertilizers, is a product that can be directly applied on your lawn without having to worry about burning it (unlike the usage of chemical fertilizers). It’s an organic solution that can instantly be absorbed by the grass, and is something that’s made readily available for the sod’s consumption. Now worm compost tea is actually worm castings that have been previously oxygenated and submerged in chlorine-free water. You can learn more about the right use and application for worm compost tea by reading further of this article. Worm Tea Supplies Vermicomposting tea can be done by gathering the following supplies: your supply of worm castings, an old sock (should be hole-less so that the compost doesn’t seep out), some dechlorinated water (you can also use tap water that’s been left to settle for about 24 hours), some molasses or corn syrup, a 5-gallon bucket, and a bubbler. How to create worm tea The water that you’ll be using for the tea should be chlorine-free. It’s best to keep it that way so that you don’t destroy the live microbes that will be present in the system. Now, have your old sock filled with some castings. Have the sock tied securely before submerging it in the water. As soon as the sock is soaked, add in some molasses or corn syrup (either organic substances will be used as food for the live organisms contained in the tea). The last step is to set-up the bubbler (aerating the tea …

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Uncle Jim’s Worm Farm

Generally, when it comes to vermicomposting, red wigglers have been able to surpass all the other worm species when their ability as composters are put to work. Composting with these worms using organic wastes keeps them alive and thriving. They can live with and eat off of decomposing food wastes for as long as they can. And the best part about them is that they’re also able to produce a valuable source of fertilizer and soil amendment (great for gardens or farms). These fascinating attributes and more will be tackled further in this article. Red wiggler worms and their different yet effective skills Not only are red worms the best composting earthworms, they’re also noted for several other interesting things. Apart from having the ability to eat half of their own weight on a daily basis, they’re also able to produce a rich source of fertilizer (out of their organic meals). It’s also through their constant production of compost (also known as worm poop or castings) that they’re also able to nourish all kinds of plant species (application of worm castings on the soil that has plants rooted in it). Red wiggler worms have also been recognized as the most quickest and most effective when it comes to decomposing and producing compost. Apart from that, they’ve also been identified as the most prolific when it comes to breeding. They can multiply quite fast (worms are able to lay eggs every 10 days), and can populate their bins (or any other …

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Organic Gardening: How to Choose the Most Suitable Worm Bin for Your Composting Worms

There are four basic types of worm composters: the bins, flow throughs, stackables, and beds. Each of these worm bin types can be the best one for your vermicomposting project. To know which of these composters will suit your preferences will, read furthermore of this article. Bins for worm use A bin can be in the form of any container that is most often than not, box-like in shape (can be used as indoor or outdoor worm bins). Mostly these are also shaped using materials that are in the form of plastic and wood (can be of lumber or plywood material). Old items in the house such as a recycled trash bin, a busted refrigerator, a broken  toilet, or an old wooden drawer can be turned into a make-shift worm composter. A Flow through for worm use A flow through is much like a bin (a box-type bin that can either be used as outdoor or indoor worm bins), as the food scraps flow-through the bin downwards. But in this set-up, the worm castings are harvested from the bottom of the container (unlike bin’s where castings are typically harvested on top of the bedding). It works by feeding the worm from the topmost part of the composter. And as the worms progress to producing these organic scraps into rich compost, their castings also gradually fall down to the base of the composter (there is a hole and a grid attached on the bottom part of the bin that helps separate …

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Eisenia Foetida: Red worms composting guide for organic gardening

Red worms composting has been one of several composting methods that are being widely used by earth enthusiasts today. Other than the profit ventures that one can also tap into when vermicomposting, this natural process can certainly help recycle daily household waste on a continual level. It can also be utilized by people who have space restrictions (can be favorable for people who own houses with a yard space and for those who have none like apartment dwellers), so it’s that flexible to maintain and have around. Setting-up a Red Worms Farm Before you can provide additional supplement to your organic garden (in this manner with the cultivation and use of worm castings fertilizer), you must first set-up a home for your red worms (make sure to place their bin where they’re away from direct sunlight – room temperature is ideal). You’ll need a worm bin (a container that can either be made out of wood or plastic), your supply of worms (you can start with about 2,000 red wigglers), some organic bedding materials (you can go with some presoaked newspaper strips with some dead leaves), and of course some worm food (cut pieces of kitchen and yard scraps). Drilled holes on the worm bin A conducive environment for your red worms would be a place where there’s enough moisture to go around and where oxygen is abundant. You can provide both for your red composting worms by drilling holes around the compost bin. You’ll need to drill evenly spaced …

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