Tips on Storing Worm Tea

There are a lot of things that you can do with worm castings; and one of them would be to make tea out of worm poop from red wrigglers, and nightcrawlers. To find out more, you should read a few facts in this article about tips on storing worm tea, and more. Worm compost tea is basically made through a brewing process. It’s created by immersing the castings of worms into the water (the castings are usually enclosed in a cloth bag, and is tied so nothing seeps out from the bag as soon as it is submerged in the water). The nutrients and the other good bacteria that’s contained in the castings are then released into the water. It’s when the water is aerated that the microorganisms grow and multiply in number (an oxygen-rich environment is produced). This worm tea dilution then becomes your liquid organic fertilizer. So, how do you exactly make worm compost tea? Well, you’re going to have to prepare a bucket that can hold a gallon, and then some dechlorinated water.

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How to make Worm Tea out of worm castings

After worm composting, what then becomes of its deposits? Now this is where the organic fertilizers come into the picture. Worm by-product can simply be used in three ways: as an organic fertilizer (still in its earthy soil state) for your plants, as a soil conditioner, and as a liquid fertilizer. The liquid fertilizer that has leached out from you worm bin is what we call worm tea. There are simple how to steps in producing your very own tea from worms. So, how do you make worm tea exactly? How to create tea from worm manure Worm manure in liquid form can be a great organic soil amendment, and is definitely odorless. You can create tea from worm poop by simply preparing the needed materials for this: a worm bin, a small rake (the hand-held type), a muslin bag, a large bucket, some water, and a squirt bottle. You can start with this simple brewing process by following these easy steps: From the bottom part of your worm bin, you will see some castings on top of it. Rake these off from the bin, which you will then place directly into the muslin bag. As soon as you’ve filled the bag with worm castings, tie it right away so that you can secure the contents of it (especially when you completely submerge it into the water). You’re going to have to submerge the muslin bag (containing the castings from red wigglers or nightcrawlers, whichever worm source it was from) …

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Tips on Harvesting Worm Castings

For some worm composters, harvesting worm castings can be a very tasking thing to do. You’re going to have to try your hand at separating the castings from the worms, at a thorough manner. But then again, a lot of worm bins make harvesting easier to do, but there are also some that aren’t as conducive. You’ll know that your worm bin has been filled-up with castings as soon as you see rich, earthy soil stuff in it. It’s also easier to harvest these worm castings if you have those stackable units at home. You’ll only have to take out the bottom tray, and empty it afterwards (you can store the castings inside another container). But if you want to try other common approaches to harvesting worm poop, then you can try the following tips: Tip 1: Since red wiggler worms are sensitive to light, you can separate them from their castings by simply shunning some light on them (you can probably use a lamp or flashlight for this); and they will instantly burrow back into the bottom part of the soil. So, as soon as the worms disappear, you can then scan through some worm manure that has been casted aside. Scoop from the top pile all the way to the bottom, using either a shovel or your hands. And if you happen to scoop in some worms, you can just put them back right in their bin. Plus, you won’t have to worry about the smell or the …

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What to feed Red Wigglers

When you’re breeding earthworms, it’s not enough that you provide them a nice and comfortable bin to thrive in. You should also be able to provide the right food supply to them. So, what to feed red wigglers then, you might ask? Read on further below to know more. What to feed Red Wiggler worms When you’re raising red worms, it’s best that you feed them only what is good for their diet. There are certain organic wastes that they can eat, and also can’t eat. So, you really have to be very knowledgeable about what to feed them with. So feeding them, comes with a little bit of care and maintenance as well. Feeding red wigglers is actually simple. You’ll just have to feed them decomposing organic wastes, that have been cut or chopped into smaller pieces already; and are then buried under the ground (to sway away from unwanted visits from pests and to also avoid odor build-ups). Moving forward, the best thing that you can feed your red wigglers is animal manure. Only feed them something that has been days old already; and have been produced by vegetable eating animals, like rabbits for example (manure from pets are not as healthy especially for worm consumption). Aside from animal manure, you can also feed them the following organic wastes: Crushed Egg Shells – adds that much needed grit for the worm’s digestion. It also provides calcium, helps in the worms reproduction, and also helps in increasing the pH …

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