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Uncle Jims Worm Blog

Red Worms, Worms, Worm Composting, Composters & VermiCulture

 Farming is no longer the situation where a child takes over the family farm that’s been in the family for years. In fact, the Bureau of Labor Statistics has reported that between 2012 to 2022 there will be a 19% decline in the employment of farmers, ranchers, and other agricultural managers.


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Gardeners and lawn enthusiasts know that late summer and early fall are a great time to give their plants an extra boost before winter begins. Your worms have been busy all summer breaking down kitchen and garden scraps. Now is a great time to dig in and harvest some "black gold."

The bottom level of your worm bin has seen the most compost is dark and nutrient-richworm action, so that's the place to begin. If the material at that level looks like topsoil and has very few worms, then it's ready to be used. (If you still see some eggshells or other hard materials, that's ok, you can pick them out.) Depending on how busy your worms have been, what you are seeing may be vermicompost or it may be straight worm castings:


coconut coir and shredded newspaper worm beddingBedding is an essential part of your worm bin and often the key to your worms’ health and happiness. You will need to add bedding when you start a new vermicomposting bin, pile or trench. Fresh bedding can help if something has gone awry in your worm bin (see “Sick Worms”). If you need to harvest a lot of worm castings, you have the option of adding bedding to your worm bin. Bedding allows the worms a fresh environment, proper moisture, and room to breathe and move. Worms also eat bedding, so it has to be safe material. Here we’ll discuss some materials for worm bedding and how you should use them.




 Just how fascinating are earthworms? Well, Charles Darwin studied earthworms for 40 years. Even more interesting is the fact that when he published his findings in the book The Formation of Vegetable Mould through the Action of Worms, with Observations of their Habits, it actually sold more copies than when On the Origin of Species was first released.


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Do you know everything about your wiggly friends in the bin or garden? With their simple life underground, worms can remain mysterious creatures! Let's open a can of worms and answer some popular questions about the life of a worm.


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Worms don’t need much to stay healthy and happy, but occasionally bad things happen. Just like humans, worms respond to changes in their environment. Sometimes the conditions in your worm bin may have become unintentionally harmful to your worms. What do you do if your worms appear to be sick or dying? Fortunately, there are some simple measures to take.


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When it comes to growing healthy, vital plants, soil building is essential. Most people who want to garden without synthetic chemicals turn to compost. Compost is a rich, dark, crumbly substance colloquially known as “black gold.” It is made from organic materials including leaves, wood chips and appropriate food scraps that have been broken down into a natural fertilizer.


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 Most of us are familiar with the reddish-grey colored earthworms that we find in gardens or on the ground following a rainstorm. Lumbricus terrestris, or more commonly known as nightcrawlers, also happen to be one of the largest worms in North America. While you’ve probably seen lots of earthworms in your life that vary in size, they can only get so big.


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Did you know that within one acre land there can be more than a million earthworms? While some people view the presence of worms like an unwelcome guest, many people have realized the benefits of having these invertebrates around. 


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